A series of books by Creator/NoraRoberts (writing as J.D. Robb), featuring police detective Eve Dallas in [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2058 New York City]]. The series has been described as ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' [-[[InSpace IN THE FUTURE]]!-] She meets, and later marries, the multi-billionaire [[OnlyOneName Roarke]]. The series concerns Eve and Roarke, and their efforts to catch various killers, psychos, and the occasional case of science gone bad.
----
[[folder:Books in this series]]
* ''Naked in Death'' (1995).
* ''Glory in Death'' (1995).
* ''Immortal in Death'' (1996).
* ''Rapture in Death'' (1996).
* ''Ceremony in Death'' (1997).
* ''Vengeance in Death'' (1997).
* ''Holiday in Death'' (1998).
* ''Midnight in Death'' (1998). A novella.
* ''Conspiracy in Death'' (1999).
* ''Loyalty in Death'' (1999).
* ''Witness in Death'' (2000).
* ''Judgment in Death'' (2000).
* ''Betrayal in Death'' (2001).
* ''Interlude in Death'' (2001). A novella.
* ''Seduction in Death'' (2001).
* ''Reunion in Death'' (2002).
* ''Purity in Death'' (2002).
* ''Portrait in Death'' (2003).
* ''Remember When'' (2003). Two-part novel. The first part covers a diamond robbery taking place in the 2000s and a number of murders connected to it. The second part takes place in the 2050s and has Eve Dallas investigating the decades-old case. Since a new series of murders has started.
* ''Divided in Death'' (2004).
* ''Visions in Death'' (2004).
* ''Survivor in Death'' (2005).
* ''Origin in Death'' (2005).
* ''Memory in Death'' (2006).
* ''Haunted in Death '' (2006). A novella.
* ''Born in Death'' (2006).
* ''Innocent in Death'' (2007).
* ''Eternity in Death'' (2007). A novella.
* ''Creation in Death'' (2007).
* ''Strangers in Death'' (2008).
* ''Ritual in Death'' (2008). A novella.
* ''Salvation in Death'' (2008).
* ''Promises in Death'' (2009).
* ''Kindred in Death'' (2009).
* ''Missing in Death'' (2009). A novella.
* ''Fantasy in Death'' (2010).
* ''Indulgence in Death'' (2010).
* ''Possession in Death'' (2010). A novella.
* ''Treachery in Death'' (2011).
* ''New York to Dallas'' (2011).
* ''Chaos in Death'' (2011). A novella.
* ''Celebrity in Death'' (2012).
* ''Delusion in Death'' (2012).
* ''Calculated in Death'' (2013).
* ''Thankless in Death'' (2013).
* ''Taken in Death'' (2013). A novella.
* ''Concealed in Death'' (2014).
* ''Festive in Death'' (2014).
* ''Obsession in Death'' (2015).
* ''Wonderment in Death'' (2015). A novella.
* ''Devoted in Death'' (2015)
* ''Brotherhood in Death'' (2016)
* ''Apprentice in Death'' (2016)
[[/folder]]

----
!!These books contain examples of:

* TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture: The first book is set in 2058, with subsequent books proceeding into the early 2060s. Technology has made numerous advancements (including the ever-popular flying cars) and humans have established colonies and commercial facilities in space; prostitution has been legalized and regulated, while guns and unrecycled paper products have been banned and vegetable/soy substitutes for environmentally touchy products like meat and coffee are widespread. References are made to an Urban Revolt that occurred in the early 21st century and ended in 2016.
* AbsentAliens: There is space travel in Robb's 21st century, but it's mostly background, and there's no mention of non-human life. (Aside from the villains Eve chases)
* AbsentMindedProfessor: Dennis Mira, the sweet-natured and slightly spacy husband of Eve's longtime colleague Dr. Mira, teaches at Columbia University. He's forgetful about details - "vague" and "dreamy" are recurring descriptors - but his wife notes that he is "skilled at fining down a point to its most elemental level," and she often discusses aspects of cases with him.
* AbusiveParents: In the backstory of both main characters, with the sole exception of [[spoiler: Roarke's real mother, who died soon after he was born.]]
* AccidentalMisnaming: That's ''Lieutenant Eve Dallas'' to you, '''not''' "Mrs. Roarke".
* ActuallyPrettyFunny: Even droids are amused when the Lieutenant uses her methods to put assholes in their place.
* AddledAddict: People addicted to the drug Funk, most often referred to as "funky junkies," are uniformly depicted this way. The drug leaves them in a perpetually vague, befuddled state of mind with limited capacity for retaining detailed information. Combined with the tendency of the drug to also wreak havoc on one's eyesight, this makes them supremely frustrating witnesses.
* AffectionateNickname: Charles Monroe calls Eve "Lieutenant Sugar," and keeps it up long after any pretense of flirtation has passed. Roarke prefers "darling Eve," and at one point programs the house computer to call her that as well, to Eve's exasperation. [=McNabb=] has "She-Body" for Peabody, and Mavis doles out excessively cute nicknames like candy.
* AgentScully: Eve flatly does not or refuses to believe in ghosts and the supernatural, even when it's [[FlatEarthAtheist staring her straight in the face.]] This vexes everyone around her.
* TheAllegedCar: Eve drives a string of them which she is secretly attached to, before Roarke insists on buying her a DamageProofVehicle.
* AlphaBitch: Sometimes [[AssholeVictim victims]], sometimes murderers.
** BitchInSheepsClothing: They have this facade before revealing their true colors.
* AndThisIsFor: Eve has one after the fact, with the knockout being for the victim.
* TheAntiChrist: David Baines Conroy in ''Ceremony in Death'' is a mass murderer who presented himself as the anti-Christ. He was caught prior to the start of the series; his case comes onto Eve's radar when it turns out that his son is involved in her current case. [[spoiler:The son, Charles "Chas" Forte, is being set up as a suspect by the real killers.]]
* ArtisticLicenseBiology: ''Naked in Death'' perpetuates the myth made popular by ''Film/{{Goldfinger}}'' in a crime anecdote that Feeney relates to Eve, involving a sex offender and murderer who coated his victims head to foot with red paint which suffocated them to death. "Skin's gotta breathe," Feeney explains. In reality, while it certainly wouldn't be ''healthy'' for someone to have their skin coated with paint, it wouldn't kill them - certainly not by suffocation, and the police report that Feeney was reading should have provided reasonably accurate information about cause of death.
* AssholeVictim: There are a lot of these. Eve starts out essentially forcing herself to sympathize with them and feel for them, an attitude which lessens as the series goes on thanks to several cases in which the victims turned out to ''really'' have it coming.
** ''Witness in Death'' has her openly admit that she couldn't feel sorry for the victim, nor truly condemn his murderer. Richard Draco is characterized right out of the gate as a petty and thoroughly unlikable prima donna who is roundly detested by everyone who knew him; scratching the surface reveals that he was also a sexual predator who routinely drugged women and filmed himself having sex with them without their knowledge or consent. [[spoiler:Including his own daughter, who was unaware of their familial connection when she started sleeping with him. Draco, on the other hand, was fully aware.]]
** ''Thankless in Death'' has Joe Klein, aka Asshole Joe, a smarmy, snarky real estate agent who hits on Peabody, ignores Eve's advice, and adamantly refuses to believe that one of his old buddies is an over-the-edge insane killer out to get him even when all evidence proves that he is. By the end of the book, he is kidnapped by said killer friend and tortured to the point of pissing himself. When Eve finally rescues him, he's sobbing and apologizing for not listening.
** The initial victim in ''Brotherhood in Death'' is portrayed right off the bat as a smug, wholly self-centered politician who cares more about money than about keeping a promise made to his late grandfather and is trying to pressure his NiceGuy cousin into selling their grandparents' house against the grandfather's final wishes. The investigation eventually reveals even worse: [[spoiler:all three of the murder victims, along with three other men, had formed a "Brotherhood" with a yearly tradition of abducting, drugging, and gang-raping young women. They'd been doing this once a year for ''forty-nine years'', even taking video recordings, and one of the men kept a lock of each woman's hair as souvenirs]]. It's hard not to side with the killer once all this comes to light, and Eve herself mostly feels disgusted that [[spoiler:only two of the six are still alive to face prosecution for their crimes, while three of their victims will have to go to jail for killing them]].
* AuthorAvatar: Eve to Nora Roberts, made blatant in some book covers where Nora Roberts cosplays as her own character.
* BackToBackBadasses: Eve and Roarke on at least two occasions.
* BadassGrandpa: Pretty much everyone who actually participated on some level in the Urban Wars TookALevelInBadass. Some of them took more than one level and retained it better. Chief Tibble, Commander Whitney, Summerset and Feeney are notable examples, while the killer in [[spoiler: Creation In Death is a subversion,]] being said to avoid all the fighting and shown to be a coward in his old age.
* BadDreams / CatapultNightmare: Eve, often dragged out of them by Roarke. Earlier in the series, certain things will make her lapse into flashback when awake. In later books, as she's begun to resolve some of her DarkAndTroubledPast, the flashbacks are less common and the dreams have gradually evolved from panic-inducing nightmares into calmer, if no less unsettling, dream conversations with the victim(s) of the investigation du jour.
* BattleButler: Summerset is normally quite prim, but he lived through the Urban Wars and has been shown fully capable of kicking ass when he has to.
* BigApplesauce: Both the text and some of the characters treat New York City with a reverence bordering on religion. In one book Roarke feels the need to point out to Eve that New York isn't the center of the universe, to which Eve replies that it should be. The fact that New York state exists beyond New York City is generally ignored.
* BigBrotherInstinct: Roarke tends to harbor protective instincts toward Eve's female colleagues, though they're not particularly weak. This is probably due to his DeadLittleSister, below.
* BigDamnHeroes: Eve frequently has such moments at the climax of a novel's storyline. Roarke has also done it a few times.
* BigEater: Peabody is always nagging Eve to stop for food. It's subtly hinted she may also be doing this to make sure [[ForgetsToEat Dallas]] eats.
* BerserkButton:
** Harm a child? [[NeverHurtAnInnocent Not on Eve's watch]]! See AbusiveParents above.
** Harm Eve and after the NYPSD makes your life a living hell, Roarke will show you new types of pain. The same applies for harming Roarke where Eve is concerned.
** It goes either and both ways, with Eve's men taking it [[ItsPersonal personally]] when someone threatens their Lieutenant. We see this in ''Treachery in Death'' after someone has just attacked Eve from the back, in front of other detectives.
-->'''Detective Jacobson''': [[ClusterFBomb Drop the fucking weapon, you fucking motherfucker or I'll fucking scramble your brains. Hands up! Hands up where I can fucking see them, you fucking cocksucker. You fucking breathe wrong, you fucking blink wrong, and I will fuck you up.]]
-->'''Eve''': That was some very creative and varied use of the word ''fuck'', Detective.
-->'''Jacobson''': Fucker. On your fucking face, you fucking shit coward. Stream my Lieutenant in the fucking back? Fuck you!
*** He then proceeds break one of the man's fingers.
** Like most examples of this trope, if you hurt, injure or kill another cop, no matter who you are, the NYPSD will drop everything to hunt you down.
** [[CorruptCop Police corruption]] for Eve.
** No matter how injured she is, even when a case is over Eve will still fight to avoid going to a hospital.
** Do ''not'' insult the NYPSD to Eve's face.
** '''''DO NOT HARM, INSULT, OR THREATEN EVE IN FRONT OF ROARKE.''''' Made even scarier by the fact that many don't even know they've mashed said button until it's too late. See TranquilFury below.
* BestServedCold: Prior to the series, Roarke meticulously planned and executed 7 murders across the globe, over the course of a decade. [[ItsPersonal The victims]] [[MoralEventHorizon earned]] [[RapeAsDrama it]].
* BewareTheNiceOnes: [[GirlyGirl Peabody]], who is good at appearing to sympathize with people, and Trueheart, who Eve says has an 'officer friendly way about him', and takes advantage of this to fool people into lowering their guard. Both contrast their senior partners who both show the tough cop image.
** Roarke in spades. While he is a former Dublin street rat and current {{Fiction 500}} billionaire, he is one of the most polite, friendly, and cheerful people in the series. But for the love of Christ do not piss him off if you value your life and livelihood.
* {{Bishounen}}: Roarke has a talent for inspiring PerverseSexualLust in Eve's female associates, to her annoyance. There's also Charles Monroe, for whom it is an asset to his (former) line of work as a Licensed Companion. Chief Medical Examiner Li Morris, described by Peabody as "seriously sexy," is a LongHairedPrettyBoy with black hair, "exotic" dark eyes, and a sense of style that Eve describes as "like an uptown rock star."
* BlackMarketProduce: Real meat and coffee are expensive luxuries that only the rich can afford. In the first novel of the series billionaire Roarke woos Dallas by giving her a present of genuine coffee from the Brazilian plantation he maintains at great expense for his own personal supply. It's so immeasurably superior to the vile sludge that usually passes for coffee (see BadToTheLastDrop) that Dallas's coffee becomes the envy of the entire Homicide division.
* BlandNameProduct:
** For various things, and averted on so few occasions that you might start wondering about ProductPlacement (or at least AuthorAppeal), since Pepsi seems to be one of the only, if not ''the'' only, major brand to survive the Urban Wars.
** There's also the various drugs like Zoner, Zeus, and Exotica, which in function and approach they're basically just Marijuana, Cocaine, and Ecstasy. Would probably be just FutureSlang if the series didn't try to point out that they're actually supposed to be distinct substances. (And yet, the originals have apparently disappeared from use. No one ever tokes some weed or snorts some coke, it's always Zoner or Zeus.)
* {{Blackmail}}: A number of individuals use this in the series. Some of them even tried this on a murderer, in a blatant WhatAnIdiot manuever. Every single one of these individuals ended up as an AssholeVictim.
** Case in point, the victim in ''Memory In Death''. No only is she dumb enough to try and blackmail New York's top homicide detective, who happens to be married to the richest man in the known universe and is '''very''' capable of slowly tearing her limb from limb with a cheerful smile on his face, but she was setting up for a ''second'' attempt when she was offed. It is sometimes hard to feel sorry for these people.
* BodyHorror: At the end of ''Chaos in Death'', it is revealed that killer was not only suffering from a split personality, but had somehow developed a method of drastically transforming his body.
* BrotherSisterIncest: [[spoiler: ''Holiday in Death'', Piper and Rudy Hoffman.]]
* BunnyEarsLawyer: The Electronic Detectives Division (EDD) and the crime lab have significantly more relaxed standards of dress and behavior as compared to most of the rest of the NYPSD, and the cops who work in these departments tend to be fairly colorful characters. In ''Apprentice in Death'' Eve meets an EDD detective who speaks in FutureSlang so impenetrable she has to have [=McNabb=] translate for her.
* BusmansHoliday: Eve and Roarke spend the first chapter of ''Indulgence in Death'' on vacation in Ireland, visiting Roarke's maternal relatives. Naturally, a body turns up. Eve resists the trope as best she can, aware that she has no actual authority to investigate, but it's a small town that hasn't had a murder of any kind in over a decade and the investigating officer is rather out of his depth. Eve ends up doing as much of the initial crime scene work as she can legally get away with and not step on toes, and provides the local cop with point by point advice on how to proceed from there.
* ByTheBookCop[=/=]CowboyCop:
** Eve somehow manages to be '''both'''! Peabody is a straighter example of ByTheBookCop but not entirely.
** Eve tries to be a ByTheBookCop so as to not give her suspects any legal loopholes to exploit and will resort to the less legal means (often by drawing on Roarke's talents for that sort of thing) only when she has no other option. Eve respects if not outright worships the Law while recognizing that her opponents work outside it.
* ClingyJealousGirl: An interesting and sympathetic example with Eve. Roarke can be very affectionate and flirty with female friends, but Eve's very good at distinguishing when she has a reason to be jealous (Maggie, the OldFlame, shows up clearly angling to rekindle the relationship in ''Innocent in Death'') and when she doesn't (Roarke gives Nadine a good luck kiss or strokes Peabody's hair after a bad scare).
* CloningBlues: ''Origin in Death''; and you thought SpiderMan had it bad...
* ClosetGeek: Borderline case with Roarke, who reads '[[InsistentTerminology graphic novels]]' and knows about IronMan, Franchise/{{Batman}} and other fandoms, but still acts like a sophisticated businessman, in contrast to every other tech-savvy character who is a full out geek or nerd.
* CloudCuckooLander: Dennis Mira, Dr. Mira's husband. Incredibly sweet and empathetic but rather spacey. Eve finds him oddly charming.
* CoolAndUnusualPunishment: In ''Innocent in Death,'' Roarke finally confronts Magdelana about her machinations... and informs her that she's going to be completely banned from every single property, business, and transportation system that he owns. Roarke owns a ''lot''.
* CoolBigSis: Peabody thinks of Dallas this way, while Dallas is impressed by Mira's grace, style and poise, to the point of her mental descriptions reaching near girl-crush levels.
* CoolCar: In ''Promises in Death'', Roarke gives Dallas an incredibly cool car custom-designed for her, packed to the gills with awesome features... and [[WhatAPieceofJunk painted like a junker]], so it won't draw attention on the street or resentment from fellow cops. Eve is grateful, since she'd had to use NYPSD-issued [[TheAllegedCar clunkers]] until "Promises".
* CoolOldLady: There are a few examples, but Edie Farnsworth in ''Thankless in Death'' takes the crown. A retired high school computer science teacher with no remarkable physical ability to speak of, she manages to keep her head together while being held prisoner by volatile impulse-driven murderer. She not only manages to sneak a hidden code into the false identity he forces her to code for him, one that will flag the ID with a fraud alert directed straight to Eve the moment it's used, she even manages to break his foot as a final middle finger. [[spoiler:She doesn't make it, unfortunately, but she dies with a satisfied smile in her heart, and her incredible toughness and savvy thinking under pressure help Eve to catch the killer in time to save his next victim.]]
* CopKiller: This has happened several times, and when it does, you can bet that this a considered a MoralEventHorizon for the cops at least.
* TheCoroner: NYPSD Chief Medical Examiner Morris primarily fills the role from ''Rapture in Death'' onwards. He's characterized as classy and stylish, very thorough in his work, and very respectful and sympathetic towards the dead.
* CreepyChild: [[spoiler: Rayleen Straffo, in ''Innocent in Death.'']]
* DaChief: Chief Tibble. Commander Whitney, as her direct superior, also serves as DaChief to Eve in many respects; both of them have good working relationships with her.
* DarkAndTroubledPast: Dallas, Roarke, Dr. Mira. How they each dealt with it is a large part of their characterization, and set them on their respective paths.
* DeadpanSnarker: Eve is very very cynical, and doesn't attempt to hide it.
* DeathGlare:
** Most of the older characters have one, but the prize has to go to Roarke, as seeing it was described as "[looking] into the face of murder.". He's willing and capable of the act, but usually doesn't because there is either no point, or more common, it would upset Eve.
* DecliningPromotion: Lt. Dallas has, in the in-story span of two and a half years, solved so many spectacular cases that she's now a public celebrity, especially following the incredibly high-profile resolution of the Icove case in ''Origin in Death''. She's been offered a captaincy but declined on the grounds that while she could be a good captain, she's more useful in the field.
* DemonicPossession: In ''Possession in Death'' Eve gets possessed by a dead gypsy who wants Eve to find her lost granddaughter.
* DepravedBisexual: Selina Cross in ''Ceremony in Death'' comes to mind. [[spoiler: She [[WouldHurtAChild sacrifices little children to the devil]], raped countless curious onlookers in her Satanist Club, drove a girl to suicide by stalking her with robotic pets and need we mention she's a Satanic drug dealer?]]
* DespairGambit: Used in Conspiracy in Death on Eve to get her off a case. [[spoiler: It almost works. Almost.]]
* {{Determinator}}: Plenty of them, but especially Eve. She will run herself until forced to stop and rest, generally by fellow determinator Roarke.
* DisproportionateRetribution: There is a general attitude in the series that murder is rarely a proportionate response to a situation, but even so, there are cases that stand out in how incredibly petty the murderer's reasons for ending the life of another human being turn out to be. Once again, ''Innocent in Death'' is a particularly notable example: Craig Foster was murdered painfully via ricin poisoning because [[spoiler:he gave Rayleen Straffo an A-minus on her project instead of an A-plus]].
* TheDitz: Mavis.
* TheDreaded: The departmental grapevine is apparently "more scared of [Eve] than [[CorruptCop Oberman]]". Eve's response:
---> I like fear. It's versatile.
* {{Dystopia}}:
** Sure, the characters think it's okay, and there's all sorts of space travel and VR and autochefs yay. But then you actually start gathering stuff together. Like the fact that someone's taken white-out to the Bill of Rights (for example, the 2nd Amendment has been mostly repealed). That real meat, coffee, tobacco, and other such things are so rare and expensive that some people go years without ever tasting them. That the environmental movement has grown so powerful that there are Green Cops who come around to hassle you if you're not being environmentally conscious enough. '''All''' your activities online are monitored at all times by the forces of [=CompuGuard=]. If Eve didn't rattle on about warrants and the "revised" Miranda (and get around the first half the time), you'd immediately start wondering if her world wasn't a low-level fascist state.
** Then, what's not a Dystopia borders on being a Mary Sue Topia. Women are paid to be mothers if they choose to stay home with their children, and people can retire quite young (the book is vague... late fifties, sixty at the latest?) and live quite comfortable lives on their default retirement package... keep in mind people live well past 100 in the setting, so it's not all that unreasonable to think someone could live on their social security anywhere from two to ''four'' times as long as they worked. Where all the money for this comes from without taxes being so high that everyone just gets a living allowance from the government is never explained.
* TheEmpath: Peabody's father and brother are this, and the former theorizes that Eve might be too.
* EnfantTerrible:
** [[spoiler: Rayleen Straffo]] in ''Innocent In Death'', who started her murderous career at ''seven''.
** By comparison, [[spoiler:Willow Mackie]] in ''Apprentice in Death'' got a slightly later start, killing twenty-five people with a long-range tactical laser at the age of fifteen. [[spoiler:She eventually reveals that the killing spree was her idea, masterminded over the course of a year, with the intent of continuing into a hundred-victim mass shooting starting at her school. Even before that, she'd threatened her stepfather, seven-year-old half-brother, and several other people on numerous occasions, not to mention killing her half-brother's puppy by breaking its neck and throwing it out a third-story window to land at the boy's feet as he came home.]]
* EngineeredPublicConfession: Eve pulls this off at the end of ''Purity in Death'' and ''Innocent in Death'', though the latter was designed for one person.
* EnmityWithAnObject: Eve has an irrational fear and hatred of all vending machines. If at all possible she refuses to use them directly, preferring to hand her money to someone else and have them buy the candy bar or whatever for her.
* EvilCounterpart: Renee Oberman in ''Treachery in Death'' is basically the opposite of Eve in every way but gender. Also Bix to Peabody. He's an attack dog subordinate with no independent thought, she's a true partner who complements Eve as part of a team.
* {{Expy}}: Eve and Roarke bear a very strong resemblance to Mel Sutherland and Sebastian Donovan from Roberts's 1992 novella ''Entranced''. Sutherland is a tough and prickly detective with short brown hair, like Eve, and Donovan is a wealthy and mysterious Irishman with black hair and blue eyes who Mel finds herself forced to work with on a case, like Roarke.
* FaceOfAnAngelMindOfADemon: Several perps across the series hide their twisted natures behind charming, attractive and innocent-looking exteriors. The most textbook example is [[spoiler:Rayleen Straffo]] in ''Innocent in Death'': [[spoiler:a pretty ten-year-old girl with curly blonde hair and violet eyes, "dewy" skin, a slightly tipped-up nose and a "rosy" mouth. She's already killed three people at the time the narration makes this description of her, starting with her own baby brother when he was two years old and she was seven]].
* FairCop: Trueheart is a rare male example. Even Eve mentally describes him as "hunky".
* AFatherToHisMen: Dallas is a [[GenderFlip Gender Flipped]] example; although she's a JerkAss and rarely emotional, or maternal, she does feel protective about them and takes pride in their successes. It's reciprocated in kind.
-->'''Peabody''': You've got one of the crappiest offices in Central. It makes us proud.
-->'''Dallas''': Seriously?
-->'''Peabody''': You don't care about the fancy, you care about the job. And your men. Everybody knows it.
** Punctuated in ''Thankless''; one of the reasons why Eve passes up the opportunity to be promoted to Captain is because she did not want her men to feel like they had to climb the chain of command simply to talk to her.
* {{Fiction 500}}: Roarke is one of the wealthiest individuals in the world, possibly ''the'' wealthiest. Eve frequently snarks about him buying whole countries; the reader may be forgiven for getting the impression that this is only ''kind'' of an exaggeration, given that any business or building Eve's investigations lead her to runs approximately a fifty-fifty chance or better of being owned by Roarke Industries or a branch thereof. And if it's not, chances are he considered buying it at one point or other. Eve eventually more or less gets used to it after a couple years of marriage, although she complains (in ''Innocent in Death'') that his corporate policy directing all of his businesses to give her whatever information she asks for without question takes the fun out of verbally sparring with uncooperative employees.
* ForgetsToEat: Eve, unless it's junk food. Roarke goes to great pains to make sure she stays fed. More subtly, so do Summerset and Peabody.
** It apparently gets so bad that Roarke had an mini Auto-Chef installed ''in her car.''
* FunPersonified[=/=]GenkiGirl: Mavis.
* FutureSlang: Drugs are chems, sedatives are soothers, painkillers are blockers and sneakers are skids, just to name a few. The most common expressions of approval are "mag" (possibly from "magnificent") and "iced" or variations upon it (as in "cool").
* GentleGiant: Leonardo, Crack when [[BewareTheNiceOnes he's not angry]] and Detective Strong's flatmate from Treachery In Death
* GentlemanThief: Roarke and Summerset are both former ones, but their skill is undiminished. Roarke, at least, keeps in practice.
* GiveMeBackMyWallet: Every now and then, Eve will catch ''other people'' getting their pockets picked, and apprehend the thief. But Roarke has been shown to pick Eve's pocket without her noticing, for fun.
* GoodCannotComprehendEvil: Dr. Mira in ''Midnight in Death'' is unable to understand David Palmer's villainy. Eve Dallas is similarly unable to understand her own mother in ''New York to Dallas''.
* GrandRomanticGesture: Roarke has a lot of resources at his disposal and he's more than willing to use all of them to show Eve how he feels about her. Among a multitude of other examples, he has the cheap apartment that she was living in at the start of the series fully and accurately recreated within his own mansion, in order to give Eve a space in the house that she can feel comfortable in.
* GranolaGirl: Peabody was raised this way, but has mostly rejected the lifestyle. Occasionally some of her old Free Ager habits pop up, invariably to commentary from Eve.
* HairColors: Mavis and Trina, self-induced. Mavis in particular has a different hair color and style every time she appears, even within the same novel; there has yet to be any indication as to what her natural color might be.
* HairTriggerTemper:
** Eve is pretty much an irritable dick to everyone around her. All the time. Even when she's in a ''good'' mood.
* HappilyMarried:
** Eve and Roarke, after a whirlwind courtship. Also, the Miras, the Feeneys, Mavis and Leonardo, and the Whitneys. Despite the books' subject matter, it's actually rather common among the first- and second-tier characters. More than, say, any of the ''Franchise/LawAndOrder'' series.
** Roberts/Robb [[SignatureStyle likes this trope]]. A lot. Especially paired with whirlwind romances. To the point that it counts as a subversion with Peabody and [=McNab=] when their relationship takes a while to build up and isn't smooth sailing in the least.
** There is Morris and Coltraine, who were developing a relationship across several books ...[[spoiler: until Coltraine was murdered in ''Promises in Death'']].
* HeroOfAnotherStory: The other Homicide detectives, particularly [[ThoseTwoGuys Baxter and Trueheart]], close their own cases and report to Eve throughout the series. This is even lampshaded in the narration, which describes them as "the leads in a buddy movie."
* HugeGuyTinyGirl: Leonardo ("built like a redwood") and Mavis ("pixielike").
* HypocriticalHeartwarming: Inverted. Eve will be a jerk to you but be a jerk to her loved ones and she will make you pay.
* IdiosyncraticEpisodeNaming: All the titles follow the style ''<Word> in Death'', with two exceptions: ''Remember When'' (a two-part novel set half in the present day and half in Eve and company's near-future), and ''New York To Dallas''.
* IfYouKillHimYouWillBeJustLikeHim:
** Played with. [[spoiler: The killer in one novel murdered a foster mother who abused both her and Eve, and told Eve that they were similar enough to have done the same. Eve says no, she wouldn't.]]
** Most of the time, Eve has to speak to Roarke about this to stop him doing something he'll regret.
*** Actually it's more often her stopping him from doing something ''she'll'' regret. Roarke, to judge by past example, seems like he'd be perfectly fine with it, but he respects that there are lines it would make Eve unhappy for him to cross.
* InternalAffairs:
** Generally portrayed more positively than is usual for crime-and-punishment fiction, but Eve (and everyone else) still has the usual prejudice against them.
** Eve seems to think that regular cops should catch dirty cops (how she considers this particularly different than the "rat squad" is unclear). Of course, in the process of catching dirty cops, Eve tends to break departmental regulations and full-blown laws like they were bubbles on bubble wrap.
* InterserviceRivalry: Oh, man, is this trope played straight to a T or what? The New York Police Department and the Internal Affairs Bureau tend to butt heads a lot in this series. The New York Police Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigation have some major hostilities between them. The FBI is mostly portrayed as stuck-up, arrogant, and above the dirty and grimy streets. The New York Police Department and the Homeland Security Organization develop some major hostilities between them. Oddly, the HSO is portrayed like the Central Intelligence Agency - dark, shadowy, powerful, has no conscience, and will break laws and regulations to the point of crossing one too many lines. The CIA is nowhere to be found in this series - whatever happened to it?
** The CIA is not allowed to operate domestically, so that setup [[FridgeBrilliance probably got overhauled in the Urban Wars]].
** One book has the Transit Police trying to grab glory in the attempt to capture a fleeing suspect. The supervisor tries to wrest command of the team from Eve, and then a trigger-happy transit cop shoots [[spoiler: Trueheart]] and causes him (and the suspect) to be badly injured. The transit cops (rightly) have some strips of hide taken off by their commander.
* InTheBlood: Eve and Roarke sure hope not. Whether or not this is true is a major theme in the books.
* ItsAllAboutMe: Common in cases where the killer in question isn't a SympatheticMurderer or lacks a FreudianExcuse. In particular, ''Celebrity in Death'' and ''Thankless in Death''.
* ItsPersonal: Quite a few of Eve's cases either start out or end up turning personal when one or more of her loved ones, or someone connected to them, ends up as either a suspect or a witness - ''Immortal,'' ''Vengeance,'' and ''Loyalty in Death'' feature attempts to frame someone close to Eve for one or more murders. (Despite the fact that personal involvement with a key figure in the case ''should'' cause Eve to be removed from the investigation due to conflict of interest, somehow this never happens.)
** In several books, the killer makes it personal by targeting Eve herself, Roarke, or both of them. ''Vengeance,'' ''Betrayal,'' and ''Imitation in Death'' provide some examples; similarly, in ''Midnight in Death'' and ''New York to Dallas,'' the killer is someone Eve previously caught who is now loose again. In ''Conspiracy in Death,'' Eve is framed for murder and for once actually ''is'' (temporarily) taken off the case.
** The entire police department takes it personally any time one of their own is killed, hurt, or threatened, such as in ''Ceremony,'' ''Judgement,'' ''Promises,'' and ''Apprentice in Death.'' In ''Purity in Death'' the villains inspire a special kind of rage in Eve by managing to, in quick succession, endanger and hurt [=McNabb=], Feeney, Peabody, and Trueheart, who is also forced to make his first kill. Likewise, the corrupt cops in ''Treachery in Death'' would already have personally offended Eve thanks to her near-reverential respect for the job and how much she defines herself by her work, but on top of that they scare Peabody half to death when she accidentally witnesses a conversation about their crimes. By the end of the book, Eve is basically trying to dig the deepest possible hole to toss their ringleader into.
* JekyllAndHyde: Played straight in ''Chaos in Death'', and good for a serious OhCrap moment.
* JerkWithAHeartOfGold:
** Eve is blunt, prickly, and confrontational toward most people. Her relationships with no few of her friends and colleagues are characterized by snark and bickering, and she takes opportunities to threaten or insult suspects and unhelpful witnesses with unabashed glee. At the same time, she feels a very personal responsibility to see justice done for the victims in her cases, and takes pains to be gentle (if awkward) with people who are suffering. Her belligerence is mostly dished out to people who can take and give it back or who have earned it by being jerks themselves, and she's a loyal and protective friend to the people who have come to matter to her.
** Aside from Eve, there's Chief Technician Dickie "Dickhead" Berenski in the NYPSD crime lab. He's whiny, sleazy, and routinely expects if not demands bribes from detectives to prioritize their cases, but he comes through when it matters and and he's supportive and protective of the crime lab techs who work for him.
* TheLadette: Guess.
* LastNameBasis:
** Feeney, Peabody, [=McNab=], Summerset. Common for cops and other law enforcement personnel in general, to the point that [[TheCoroner Morris]] - first introduced in ''Rapture in Death'' - doesn't have his given name (Li) mentioned until more than two dozen books later in ''Promises in Death''.
** Roarke takes it to the extreme; presumably he had a given name at one point, but [[OnlyOneName he refuses to claim it now]].
** This gets a LampshadeHanging when a cop called Carmichael ends up transferred to Eve's division despite there already being a Detective Carmichael. The two are thereafter referred to as "Carmichael" and "Uniform Carmichael"/"the other Carmichael" to differentiate them, with Eve complaining (during ''Indulgence in Death'') that both of them having the same name is confusing and one of them should change theirs.
* [[LikeASonToMe Like a Daughter to Me]]: In ''Conspiracy in Death'' Mira compares her feelings to Eve to the ones she has for her children.
* LineOfSightName: Dallas's surname comes from where she was found.
* LongRunningBookSeries
* LoonyFan: In ''Obsession in Death,'' Eve is obliged to start reviewing her considerable accumulation of fanmail for correspondence that may have come from the novel's UNSUB. She's disturbed to discover that she has quite a ''few'' loony fans who, despite having never met or interacted with her in person, have constructed elaborate delusions of personal relationships with her.
* TheMaidenNameDebate: Eve keeps her maiden name after marrying Roarke, and is quick to shut down the clueless who try to call her "Lt. Roarke" (or worse, "Mrs. Roarke").
* MamasBabyPapasMaybe: [[spoiler:Subverted and Inverted. Roarke's "mom" played along with Patrick Roarke in pretending to be his mother either by threat of physical violence or his golden gab since he killed Roarke's mom.]]
* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: It's made clear in ''Ceremony In Death'' that the Satanist cult's "magic" is a combination of drugs and tech, but whether Wiccan priestess Isis has real magical abilities is left more ambiguous. Eve, the AgentScully, steadfastly refuses to consider the possibility, while [[AgentMulder Roarke and Peabody]] are more willing to believe.
* MindControlDevice: [[spoiler: It turns out that a VR console Roarke was planning to distribute turned out to be this, the doctor who assisted in making the console began using it as a demented way of [[DrivenToSuicide driving people to suicide]] [[GoOutWithASmile with smiles on their faces.]] Roarke almost meets the same fate except he realizes who the murderer was.]]
* MinorCrimeRevealsMajorPlot: Several instances.
* MommasBoy: [[spoiler: The reveal of Roarke's real mother as a good person turns him into this, unfortunately, [[DeadAllAlong she's dead.]]]]
* MoralityChain:
** Eve to Roarke, stopping him killing quite a few people and the reason he gave up the criminal side of his enterprises. God only knows what would happen if she ever died.
** Think {{Roaring Rampage of Revenge}} [[XMeetsY meets]] {{Unstoppable Rage}}. May or may not include elements of {{Best Served Cold}}
* MotherhoodIsSuperior: Averted with Eve Dallas, because while her father Richard Troy was a child molester, her mother, who has many names, is fully revealed to be evil as well in ''New York To Dallas''. Initially subverted with Roarke, with Meg Roarke and Patrick Roarke being equally uncaring AbusiveParents, but in ''Portrait In Death'' he learns that his birth mother was actually a sweet young woman named Siobhan Brody, who loved him and didn't see what a monster Patrick Roarke was until it was too late.
* TheMourningAfter: Morris spends several books in mourning after [[spoiler:Coltraine]] is murdered in ''Promises in Death''. Four books and a novella later, ''Indulgence in Death'' shows him just starting to wear colors other than black again.
* MuggingTheMonster: Eve's abusive former foster mother discovers that Eve has married into the {{Fiction 500}} and tries to blackmail Roarke. Roarke is not having it, already has six killings under his belt, and is ''very'' protective of Eve. He terrifies the woman into retreat. [[spoiler: She dies, but he didn't do it.]]
* MustHaveCaffeine: Eve. It's no coincidence that Roarke's first successful courting gift to her is a bag of genuine, high-quality coffee.
* NatureVersusNurture: Eve and Roarke both struggle on and off with the question of how much of their monstrous parents and generally horrible childhoods they carry with them, as they have both genes ''and'' environment working against them. The series overall seems to take the stance that while genetics and upbringing can both shape a person, the real answer is often "neither" - for every perp who has it InTheBlood or was warped by the circumstances and events of their lives, there's one who had perfectly normal, caring parents who did their best to raise their child right, with no history of trauma, abuse, or hereditary mental instability. Some people, it seems, are simply born monsters... but by the same token, it's possible for a person to rise above horrific parents and childhood and make something better out of themselves.
* NeverForgottenSkill: Roarke was quite the accomplished pickpocket and thief in general in his youth. He still is, actually, and he'll never forget his skills at stealing as long as he lives.
* NiceCharacterMeanActor: In ''Celebrity in Death'', the actress who plays Peabody in the Icove movie turns out to be a vindictive, obsessively jealous bitch who tries to intimidate, blackmail, and/or stalk various coworkers and associates.
* NonIdleRich: Louise Dimatto, a high society trust fund baby who is dedicated to her career as a doctor and runs a low-income clinic for patients who can't afford much by way of medical care. Roarke is constantly working on various projects and business deals, despite being more than wealthy enough to be as idle as he'd like to be. Eve also counts after marrying Roarke, though she doesn't really think of his assets as being in any way related to her.
* NoSocialSkills: Eve.
* NotSoFakePropWeapon: In ''Witness in Death''. [[spoiler:Subverted; the person who switched the prop out for a real knife was the actress who used it to stab the victim during the play, and knew all along what she was doing.]]
* NotWithThemForTheMoney: Eve's relationship with Roarke occurs in spite of his obscene wealth rather than because of it. She is horrified when he presents her with an enormous diamond as a souvenir from a trip to Australia, and after their marriage she not only refuses to think of his assets as hers, she gets mad at him when she realizes he's been putting funds into an account in her name and demands that he take it back. (Her standard responses are that she actually married him for the [[MustHaveCaffeine coffee]] or sex.)
* OddNameOut:
** ''Remember When'' breaks the "_____ in Death" title pattern, probably because only half of the book involves Eve.
** ''New York to Dallas'' is fully an Eve Dallas novel. In this case the break in the pattern may be due to the fact that not only does most of the story take place in Dallas, Texas instead of New York City, the case ties significantly into Eve's past.
* OOCIsSeriousBusiness: Eve and Summerset's initial mutual antipathy gradually develops into a ritual of verbal sparring, carried out primarily when Eve comes home after a day's work and Summerset meets her in the foyer to exchange insults. Summerset being absent is not necessarily cause for Eve to be concerned, but any time they meet in the foyer and one of them ''fails'' to jab at the other, it's a clear and immediate sign that something serious is going on.
* OnlyOneName: Roarke. Creator/NoraRoberts has stated that she will not reveal his given name.
* ParentalSexualitySquick: Played subtly with Feeney. As Eve's ParentalSubstitute, sex is about the only topic that seriously squicks them out.
* ParentalSubstitute: Mira and Feeney for Eve. Summerset for Roarke, and later, [[spoiler: his long lost Irish relative.]]
* PercussiveMaintenance: Eve's standard method of dealing with any and all technology.
* PolitenessJudo: Roarke is an ''n''th degree black belt in it.
* PopCulturalOsmosisFailure: Eve has very little awareness of or interest in pop culture, to the point that her failure to recognize references is a minor RunningGag. Presumably this comes from her lack of a childhood, extreme focus on police work, and general isolation from most other people prior to getting involved with Roarke. Among many other things, she's shown to be ignorant of IronMan, Franchise/{{Batman}}, Film/JamesBond, StarTrek and other fandoms mentioned throughout the books (''Calculated In Death'' has a bunch of these), and rarely recognizes the contemporary celebrities of the setting. She also has no ear for music, a fact Lampshaded and lamented on by [[TheMentor Feeney]] who often reacts with disgust at her lack of knowledge in it. She ''is'' well-informed on famous murder cases (Like UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper) and will study up on a particular piece of pop culture if it's relevant to a case she's working.
* PosthumousCharacter: Eve's father Richard Troy was dead long before the series began, but he is nevertheless a major figure in the series. He appears in Eve's nightmares and flashbacks from the first book onward; as Eve gradually remembers more about her childhood, Roarke eventually manages to discover his name and other details about him, culminating in the discovery (in ''Divided in Death'') that [[spoiler:Homeland Security was using Troy as an informant and knew what he was doing to Eve but did not intervene, and also that Troy did business with Patrick Roarke and was probably planning to sell Eve to him as a child prostitute]]. To a lesser extent, Roarke's father Patrick carries a lingering influence despite also having been dead for more than twenty years at the beginning of the series,
* PowersViaPossession: [[spoiler: In ''Possession in Death'', Eve get possessed by an old gypsy's ghost and seems to gain a few powers, of sorts. She can read Russian and Romanian, and [[ISeeDeadPeople see dead people.]] When the spirit leaves, she offers to give Eve her gift of seeing the dead, but is turned down.]]
* PragmaticHero: Eve Dallas
* [[PrecisionFStrike Precision C Strike]]: The only time Eve uses the word in the entire series kicks off a particularly vicious stream of invective.
** Then again when describing a nightmare where her [[AbusiveParents mom]] tries to kill Bella.
* PrintLongRunners: 50 titles plus.
* ProtagonistCenteredMorality:
** Some of the later books seem to have begun wandering into this area. The idea that justice may be more important than the law isn't too bad itself... but Eve always seems to be the judge of what's justice. Past book thirty or so, she goes from bending the law when it's absolutely necessary to breaking it at will. If she weren't generally presented as unfailingly right, it would almost look like a case of JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope.
** Oh...let's be honest. This trope has been present since the very first book of this series. For Eve, Roarke is this trope. ''Vengeance in Death'' had Eve finding out about some very serious crimes, however justified, committed by her husband. She had to choose between the law or her husband. Take a wild guess on which one she picked. Then there was ''Creation in Death'', which had Eve finding out from the killer that he prepared documents a long time ago that will legally allow him to commit suicide. [[spoiler: She has Roarke erase the documents, and states quite clearly to him that she is crossing the line]]. Of course, the book demonstrated that the killer was a Complete Monster, so Eve's actions could be considered a Crowning Moment Of Awesome and not a Moral Event Horizon. If it is any consolation, Eve discusses her actions with Roarke in ''Salvation in Death''.
* PsychicPowers: Some have been proven scientifically by the time of the series, and possessors thereof are registered with the state. Peabody's brother Zeke has them, and they form a part of ''Visions in Death'''s plot.
* PsychoSupporter: The murderer in ''Obsession in Death'' styles themself as Eve's "true and loyal friend," murdering people who they perceive as having offended or injured Eve and escaped or otherwise flouted justice. Given the confrontational attitude that Eve takes with just about everyone, she quickly realizes with discomfort that the list of potential future victims is uncountably long.
* RealWomenDontWearDresses: In-Universe. Dallas, a firm tomboy with little use for or interest in fashion or makeup, is torn between disdain and admiration of more traditionally feminine women. She perpetually disapproves uncomfortably of Peabody's ventures into personalizing her style with "girlie" touches like fashionable clothes and bright colors, which Eve finds inappropriate for a cop, and she's alternately impressed and baffled by Dr. Mira's classical ProperLady style. The series itself doesn't really take Dallas' side, though.
* RememberWhenYouBlewUpASun: A number of Eve's more sensational cases get brought up throughout the series, but the Icove case is the most popular. In the novels that follow ''Origin in Death'', the story gets turned into a bestselling book in-universe, and then into a movie.
* RidiculouslyHumanRobot: There are "droids", both human and animal, but close observation can make them as not real.
* RippedFromTheHeadlines: The science gone bad stories often feature concepts that are theoretical now.
* RoaringRampageOfRevenge:
** Prior to the series, [[spoiler:Roarke]] murdered six men in revenge for their [[spoiler:rape and murder of Summerset's daughter Marlena]]. The deaths in ''Vengeance in Death'', the book in which this is revealed, turn out to be the CycleOfRevenge coming around again [[spoiler:at the hands of the wife and son of one of the original six victims]].
** The villain in ''Thankless in Death'' considers his murders as vengeance, but it's more that he's a sociopathic, narcissistic scumbag who is convinced that nothing is his fault and all his problems are the works of others trying to screw him over.
** The victims in ''Brotherhood in Death'' are tortured and their bodies left with the message 'Justice Is Served'. Eve's investigation eventually discovers that they [[spoiler:had drugged and gang-raped a woman a year for forty-nine years]], and were killed by [[spoiler:three of their victims after the suicide of a fourth]].
** In ''Apprentice in Death'', [[spoiler:Reginald Mackie and his daughter Willow]] are ticking off a hit-list of people who [[spoiler:Reginald]] blames for the death of his second wife and unborn son in a traffic accident, including the victim's OBGYN (her appointment ran late), the beat cop who handled the accident scene, and the attorney he hired to try to prove someone was at fault after the death was ruled accidental. [[spoiler:In a subversion, Mackie was encouraged into the revenge plan by Willow, who doesn't actually care about her stepmother's death and just wants the opportunity to kill people.]]
* RunningGag:
** The candy thief, who is probably just waiting to become a ChekhovsGunman.
** Eve's ongoing feud with all sorts of mechanical and/or electronic systems. For example, the drink machine at Eve's precinct which seems to hate her as much she hates it. It's practically [[OnceAnEpisode Once a Novel]] that she orders someone else to get her a tube of Pepsi from the thing.
** Eve forgetting or losing her gloves, and everyone's recognition of the same. In ''Midnight in Death'' she's appalled when Summerset tells her that the gloves Roarke has given her are handmade mink-lined Italian leather: "Mink lining, for Christ's sake. I'll have lost them by next week, then some stupid mink will have died for nothing."
** Before getting her special car from Roarke, Eve had a minor running gag about her problems with requisitions because of her cars always getting blown up or wrecked, and them giving her terrible replacements.
* SailorsPonytail: Roarke has longish hair which he normally wears loose, but when sitting down to do some intensive technical work he pulls it back in a stubby ponytail which the narration, via Eve's point of view, describes as making him look vaguely piratical
* ScaryBlackMan: Chief Tibble and Crack, in very different fashions: as DaChief, Tibble is a stern, intimidating authority figure. Crack, meanwhile, is the heavily-tattooed bouncer of a dive bar in a bad part of town.
* SelfMadeOrphan: [[spoiler: Eve. Both parents, with 20 years in between.]] Justified like you wouldn't believe, though.
* SerialKiller: Several, but particularly The Groom.
* {{Sidekick}}: Delia Peabody to Eve; Troy [[MeaningfulName Trueheart]] to Baxter.
* SinsOfTheFather: Subverted. Roarke's father was a notorious and cruel criminal, a reputation Roarke has had to go to some effort to shake off (Roarke doesn't hit women for example, unless when sparring) to the extent it makes him TheDreaded, although his own history adds to it too. When he finds out he has family on his real mother's side he expects them to blame him for her death and want some of his money in recompense. Instead they welcome him with open arms.
* SlapSlapKiss:
** Peabody and [=McNab=].
** The essence of Eve and Roarke's whole relationship even after they get married.
* TheSociopath: A large part of murderers in Eve's roster are sociopaths.
* SoleSurvivor: Poor little Nixie Swisher witnesses the slaughter of her whole family at the tender age of nine. (''Survivor in Death'')
* SoapOperaRapidAgingSyndrome: A minor example, as Mavis's daughter Bella is born in January of 2060 in ''Born in Death'' but by the summer (''Treachery in Death'') she is up walking and (kind of) talking.
* StrangeMindsThinkAlike: In ''Witness in Death'', Eve answers the assertion that Roarke would jump in front of a maxibus for her by saying, "They don't go very fast." Later in the book she asks Roarke, who was not present for the original conversation, if he would jump in front of a maxibus for her. His reply is, "Absolutely. They don't go very fast."
* StrawmanPolitical: In the first book at the very least, the parties have discarded their former names and are now just the Conservatives, Moderates, and so on. The Conservatives are evil and corrupt to a man, depicted as snarling tyrants obsessed with destroying contraception because they hate women being able to control their reproductive faculties. [[spoiler: And of course, the Conservative Senator who wants to make prostitution illegal and gun ownership legal is a slobbering, incestuous child-raper.]]
* SympatheticMurderBackstory: Both Eve and Roarke turn out to have murder in their backstories. As a child, Eve [[spoiler:stabbed her father to death in self-defense when he raped and beat her]]. Roarke, meanwhile, turns out in ''Vengeance in Death'' to have [[spoiler:gone on a RoaringRampageOfRevenge and killed several men involved in the rape, torture, and death of Summerset's daughter Marlena]].
* [[{{TakingTheBullet}} Taking the Nerve Disruptor]]:
** Eve does this for Summerset, her continuing low-level antagonist.
** Roarke gets saved from a stab wound in the same manner by [[spoiler: Mick Connelly]], leading to one of the tearjerkers in the series.
* TherapyIsForTheWeak: Eve isn't very receptive to Mira at first, but she comes around, and even sees psychology as a valuable tool.
* ThereAreNoPsychologists: Averted. Charlotte Mira serves both as Eve's confidante and case consultant/TheProfiler. Eve has also been known to recommend Dr. Mira to others who've gone through especially traumatic experiences, and Nadine is revealed to have some sessions with her as well.
* TheyFightCrime: A multi-millionare ex-criminal and a cop team up together to solve crimes.
* ToThePain: Roarke explains to a shadow of Eve's past that he'd like nothing more than to peel the skin from her bones. One thin layer at a time.
* {{Tomboy and Girly Girl}}:
** Dallas and Peabody. One's the hard-charging badass cop, the other ''tries'' to be. But their reactions to Trina the stylist (Dallas: ''Dear God no!'', Peabody: ''Let me at it!'') really bring it home.
** Also Dallas and Mavis. And Dallas and Dr. Mira. Really, any other female character in the series is girly compared to Eve.
** Most of the ''men'' are girly compared to Eve, sometimes Roarke will know more about feminine matters than Eve herself. Which isn't hard, to tell the truth.
* TooDumbToLive: You sometimes wonder why some victims still know how to breathe. A shining example would be the one in Eternity in Death.
* TranquilFury: Roarke is the champion of this trope within the series; Eve is actually more scared when he gets like this than when his anger shows in his actions.
* TraumaInducedAmnesia: Eve, who had forgotten most of her DarkAndTroubledPast at the start of the series.
* TriangRelations:
** Type Four. Webster is in love with Eve who is married to Roarke. Roarke is aware of Webster's infatuations, resulting in the two men fighting each other briefly. Afterwards, they come to an understanding: Webster is in love with Eve, and Roarke doesn't mind as long as Webster doesn't try anything on her, and remembers she is his wife.
** [[spoiler: In ''Treachery in Death'', Webster recently started a relationship with Darcia Angelo and it seems pretty serious. So he's moving on and things are finally resolving.]]
* TroublingUnchildlikeBehavior: Eve and Roarke's childhoods were not good. Also, [[spoiler: Rayleen Straffo in ''Innocent in Death.'']]
* TurnInYourBadge: [[spoiler:In ''Conspiracy in Death,'' leading to a major HeroicBSOD for Eve and royally pissing off Roarke]].
* UndyingLoyalty: Eve and Roarke to each other. Eve to Feeney. Eve's squad to Eve, ''especially'' Peabody.
* UnscrupulousHero: Roarke.
* VengefulVendingMachine: Eve Dallas hates vending machines, and the feeling seems to be mutual. They tend to malfunction whenever she attempts to use one. It's so bad that she habitually has someone else put her money in for her and press the button whenever she wants to buy something from one.
* VillainousBreakdown: Some murderers are subjected to this when Even foils them.
* VillainByDefault: There's plenty of those, with drug dealers, pedophiles, defense attorneys, and others.
* WalkingTechbane: Machines tend to misbehave around Eve, maybe because she beats them half to death when they aren't cooperating.
* WesternTerrorists: Doomsday (a cyber-terrorist group) and Cassandra, the latter in turn being an offshoot of the pre-series WesternTerrorists [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic Apollo]].
* WhatAPieceOfJunk: Eve's latest car is a gift from Roarke, and is fast, reliable, and filled with all sorts of gadgets, including [[FlyingCar Vertical Mode]] and a built-in Auto-Chef....however, from the outside, it looks like a junker. This is both for protection, since Eve often has to park her vehicle in seedy areas where an obviously expensive car would be a magnet for theft and vandalism, and so as not to draw resentment from other cops who would see driving a flashy vehicle as an indication that Eve was more interested in personal appearances than her job.
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: When Crack returns from his WalkingTheEarth stint, Eve asks him to help her with some undercover work. His attempts and the results of such have yet to be mentioned.
* WhatMeasureIsANonHuman: Droids are a bit of a muddy area, here. While no one outright says they're sentient, and it's mostly implied that they're just well-programmed to emulate some emotional responses, they do display traits like fear and self-preservation... usually when Eve threatens to have them taken apart or destroyed for not being as cooperative as she'd like.
** ''Obsession In Death'' takes this a step further by introducing droid ''police officers.'' Called "D-Officers," they appear to be utilized as first-response officers in places where it would be difficult or dangerous for human officers to arrive in a timely fashion. Along with being made to look distinctively like human beings, they act mostly like humans as well, going by given names and even managing to [[ActuallyPrettyFunny look somewhat amused]] when Eve makes a lewd and unfriendly bystander talk by utilizing a [[GroinAttack very unfriendly grip]] on him.
* WhatTheHellHero: "Isn't it funny how no one likes a dirty cop, but nobody wants to hang out with the guys that catch them?" Eve [[IgnoredEpiphany promptly ignores]] this utterly apt and pointed observation from her former friend and continues to refer to Internal Affairs as the "rat squad".
* WhoMurderedTheAsshole: Several cases have a wealth of suspects thanks to the victim being a terrible, or at least thoroughly unlikable, person (see AssholeVictim). One textbook example is Richard Draco in ''Witness in Death,'' who proves to have been such scum while he was alive that Eve for the first time in the series admits that she can't feel any sympathy for him nor condemn his murderer, [[spoiler:considering that she killed him for starting an exploitative sexual relationship with their unwitting daughter]]. Agatha Christie references abound.
* WhyDidItHaveToBeSnakes:
** Eve has a severe fear of heights. Only her iron discipline keeps her from externalizing her strong internal reaction. She also has a fear of [[spoiler:cows,]] but it's not as violent. Both of these are symptomatic of a general case of semi-agoraphobia, derived from living in large cities all her (remembered) life.
** Both shrink as to nothing compared to her fear and loathing of anything even vaguely resembling a hospital. In fact, no matter how injured or fatigued she is the only way to get her to submit to treatment is if she's unconscious and/or physically restrained. It verges on the masochistic.
* WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds: ''Holiday In Death'' and ''Portrait In Death'' have killers who could be considered this. Those killers suffered losses that was the end of the world for them. They turned to murder because for them, it's the only way to unleash the pain. Those killers are also implied to have been born with untreated mental disorders. Perhaps they are unsympathetic, but it can be agreed that they are pathetic.
* {{World War III}}: The Urban Wars, a period of very violent worldwide civil unrest. Roarke mentions that it ran longer in Ireland than most places.
----

<<|{{Literature}}|>>