Fridge: Contagion

Fridge Brilliance
  • The revelation that Krumwiede falsified the Forsythia cure puts a scene where he refused to give an infected friend Forsythia into a whole new light.
  • The main film page mentions a Flower Motif of yellow flowers whenever there's a personal loss or tragedy. Krumwiede claims to have been cured by Forsythia, which is a yellow flower itself.

Fridge Horror
  • Since Sun Feng's village used the placebo, they will assume that they are vaccinated. If they return to their daily lives, they will contract the disease and everyone, including the children, will die. Moreover, Dr. Orates will have no idea where the village is since she was blindfolded and rode a car with the windows covered, so it's highly unlikely she'll be able to get there before it's too late.
  • When Doctor Mears gets sick in her hotel room, she immediately asks for the names of everyone who has ever cleaned her room or brought her food. Even if she gave it to just one of them (and not the other way around) it's likely that, due to the high communicability rate of the disease, and the fact that hotel staff serve multiple rooms, nearly everyone in the hotel has now been infected.
  • Krumwiede says that the real cure could have bad effects and cause death farther down the line. He's supposed to be grasping for some justification to explain why he would lie about the cure. However, since the researcher injected herself to make a cure without clinical trials, he could possibly be completely right.
  • The entire movie is a singular case of Fridge Horror. It represents a BEST CASE SCENARIO for a major emergent viral pandemic. The pandemic would play out MOSTLY how it was shown, but the actual time frame would be much, much longer. Society would suffer a complete breakdown (with the possibility of Weapon of Mass Destruction events, loss of all utilities, a much higher level of destruction, etc.) and a vaccine, if any were to be had, would take years to test and distribute, not months. The death toll? In the hundreds of millions, possibly over a billion people. For once, Hollywood's understating the severity of the event and its aftereffects on civilization.
    • All of this is dependent on the details of the virus. Despite its high communicability, several medical experts have pointed out that the speed at which it kills would actually make a major epidemic much less likely. You can't say it's the "best case scenario" for a "major emergent pandemic" when both "best case" and "major" are completely arbitrary standards entirely dependent on the disease itself.
  • The For Want of a Nail chain of events that lead to the pandemic could easily have been broken. So how many incipient viral outbreaks have we been spared from without knowing about it?
    • The virus is based on the Nipah virus and its suspected origins. It's hypothesised that cross-contamination of bat and pig living spaces has been happening for years before the lethal virus emerged. These chains of events are inevitable, but the chances of them turning into a mass outbreak are still very low.