Created By: FlyingDuckManGenesis on August 22, 2013 Last Edited By: HeroGal2347 on March 13, 2016
Troped

Prefer Jail To The Protagonist

When villains seek protection from the law against the protagonist or their companions.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
A villain has plotted an Evil Plan, an evil plan so terrific he has no doubt in its completion. Nothing can stand in his way, not even that do-gooder coming down the street!

But wait — suddenly he's stuck in the area with this guy for some time. Now the evil plan doesn't seem so important — all that's important is getting away from this nut, no matter how! Maybe the person is so loony he makes your head spin. Maybe he's so bratty he makes you pull your hair out (what hair he didn't pull out himself). In the worst cases, he may be so fearsome he makes your blood curdle and your hair stand up. Whatever the cause, nothing could be worse than being alone with him another minute. But where can you go? Back to jail!

Note that this strategy does not always work. An extremely determined person may follow the villain back to the prison he's trying to go to escape from him. The point is, however, that prison isn't a concern for the bad guy anymore. all that matters is getting this annoyance/terror off his back.

Can be the result of Pity the Kidnapper, Unintentionally Notorious Crime or Mugging the Monster. An interesting subversion is Cruel Mercy if the hero realizes that jail is too easy for the villain. Contrast The Mob Boss Is Scarier, where a criminal is so fearsome, that no one will inform on them and will take jail time or other legal penalties rather than risk their wrath.


Examples

Anime and Manga
  • Jojos Bizarre Adventure villain Akira Otoishi is in prison for robbery, though he committed worse crimes that cannot be revealed due to The Masquerade. He's perfectly fine with this, since he's terrified of the alternative of Okuyasu and Josuke dealing with him for his more serious crimes of murdering Okuyasu's brother and trying to kill Josuke's father.

Comic Books
  • In a comic book published by Dell Comics based on the Twist (yes, you read that correctly), a one page comic sees a man released from jail after 25 years. He returns to where he used to hang out, only to witness everyone doing the Twist. He promptly runs back to jail.
  • Inversion in Blake and Mortimer. When Olrik (who had been working for a rogue Soviet doctor) is arrested, he's his usual flippant self when Blake and Mortimer visit his cell, but when he learns he's being exchanged by the British police to the Soviets, he begs for them to prevent it.
  • In The Death of Superman story arc of the Superman comics, Batman catches a terrorist who was going to use Superman's funeral as an opportunity to assassinate a world leader. Batman caught him and said that in Superman's honor, he'd do things Superman's way. The assassin is left tied to a flagpole begging to be arrested because "Batman might come back!"
  • Many criminals let themselves be imprisoned so as to evade The Punisher (and depending on their status may end up in a Luxury Prison Suite). When that happens, Frank turns himself in, always getting sent to the same prison, and takes out the criminal (and the criminal's bodyguards, tough guys who want to show off, rival prison gangs, prisoners he runs into on the way, and his cellmate) before breaking out of the prison.

Film
  • In The Muppets Take Manhattan, a phony Broadway producer is about to be arrested for fraud when he takes Gonzo and Camilla hostage. After an attack from Animal, he begs to be arrested.
  • John Woo's The Killer has Wong Hoi doing this at the end of the movie to get away from Inspector Li Ying, who wants him dead for killing Ah Jong, the protagonist of the film. This results in Li gunning him down right in front of his fellow officers and then getting arrested.

Literature
  • In the Honor Harrington short story "What Price Dreams" the control officer of an assassination attempt was detected and mobbed by treecats, to such a degree he screamed for help and made a full confession more or less on the spot to the rangers and bodyguards coming to the scene.

Live-Action TV
  • In an episode of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, the Banks hire an ex-con as a servant while Jeffery's away. Eventually he decides to violate his parole and go back to jail rather than continue to work for Phil Banks.
  • A subversion occurs in the iCarly episode, "iFind Lewbert's Lost Love". Even though Chuck Chambers was responsible for stealing all the TV remotes in the Bushwell Plaza, Lewbert tells the police that he stole the remotes in order to get away from Marta Trundel, his ex-girlfriend. Just to ensure he's away from her for a long time, he slaps one of the officers to extend his sentence.
  • Barney Miller
    • In one episode inveterate gambler Nick comes in crowing about a big score he had made: he picked all the bowl games, then bet it all on a hockey game and won there too. Then his bookie comes into the detective squad room and turns himself in for illegal betting: turns out everyone had had the same sting of luck and he can't cover his bets. And not everyone is as nice as Nick is.
    • In another episode a burglar had been caught and tried in a makeshift community court (which had been designed for small civil disputes) and had been serving his "sentence" locked up in the basement. He escapes and is picked up by the real cops; he's grateful to be in a real jail.
  • At the end of one The Adventures of Superman episode, one villain tells another he can call the police: "Better a hundred of those guys than Superman!"
  • One episode of Law & Order: Criminal Intent, had a rising mob boss who used You Have Outlived Your Usefulness or The Mob Boss Is Scarier liberally. In the end Goron manages to use this against him by making it look like one of his henchmen was plotting against him, meaning said henchman practically begged Goren to arrest him and cut a deal.

Western Animation
  • The Looney Tunes short, "Bugs and Thugs", has Bugs Bunny trick Rocky and Mugsy into hiding in a stove, then later impersonate a policeman and light the stove with them still inside. When the real policeman shows up, Rocky and Mugsy beg for him to take them to jail.
  • The Tiny Toon Adventures episode, "Take Elmyra Please" has Arthur Jabba's henchmen, George and Leonard, kidnap Elmyra Duff and hold her for ransom in exchange for her father's fuel formula. Elmyra thinks their hideout is a TV studio and her antics drive George and Leonard up the wall, to the point where by the time her younger brother, Duncan, and the police show up, George and Leonard beg for the police to take them to jail. Of course, since the kidnapping was Mr. Jabba's idea, they rat him out and he is arrested as well.
  • The Action League Now episode, "Flesh and Blood" has two criminals impersonating The Flesh's parents and tricking him into robbing a mansion. However, the Flesh's inadvertent injuries to them get them to confess they're not his real parents and beg for the police to take them to jail.
  • The Powerpuff Girls
    • The episode, "Child Fearing" has Mojo Jojo being released from prison to babysit Blossom, Bubbles, and Buttercup while the Professor is at a meeting. At first, he wants them to help him take over Townsville, but taking care of them is too much for him to handle, and he calls the police so they can take him back to jail.
    • The Amoeba Boys avert this - they simply want to go to jail to prove they're as much of criminals as the other villains in Townsville.
    • In the episode, "Sun Scream", two criminals are disgusted by the girls' sunburnt skin peeling and beg to be taken to jail. However, the girls decide to leave them stranded on an island with only a tube of sunscreen instead. The criminals get sunburned as a result of not using the sunscreen, claiming it's only for nerds.
  • In the The New Woody Woodpecker Show episode, "Baby Buzzard", Buzz disguises himself as a baby so he can rob Woody's house when Woody starts his babysitting service. When Woody finds out that Buzz is robbing his house, he makes him take a nap with a live, ferocious badger, who mauls him while Woody calls the police. When the Policeman arrives, Buzz begs for him to arrest him. Subverted at the end, in which the badger also gets arrested and mauls Buzz while in the paddy wagon.
  • In the Garfield and Friends episode "Tooth Or Dare", a saber-toothed tiger (depicted as a present-day tiger with saber teeth instead of the correct depiction called a Smilodon) kicks Garfield out of the house, disguising him as a saber-toothed tiger while the real tiger is free to roam about through the house whenever he likes. At the end, the tiger is finally driven out of the house and begs for the museum guards to take him back to the museum. The museum guards do so and it is revealed that Garfield had invited Nermal over to pester the tiger about how cute he was, which was what made the tiger want to leave the house.
  • In Teen Titans 4th season, Dr. Light faces Raven using her dark powers, whereas exposure to that in the 1st season reduced him into a shivering wreck. Upon seeing that thing again in the 4th season, Dr. Light goes from "No one defeats Dr. Light!" into "I'd like to go to jail now, please."
  • Variation in The Batman. In one episode, Penguin tries to hand himself over to Batman because an even more dangerous vigilante named 'Rumor' has begun attacking Gotham's criminal community. Everyone knows that criminals who cross Batman end up handed over to the police and arrested, but criminals Rumor targets are abducted and ever seen again, so Penguin decides a jail cell is the safest place he can be.
  • Batman: The Animated Series. After his encounter with the Creeper, The Joker surrenders to Batman, declaring the Creeper "a lunatic" without any irony whatsoever.
  • In the Tuff Puppy episode, "Moms Away!", Snaptrap plans to get rid of all the Moms in Petropolis by shipping them to a deserted island and stranding them there. At the end of the episode, Dudley foils Snaptrap's plan and decides to have his Mom punish him. Snaptrap begs to be taken to jail instead.
  • An episode of Mister T titled "Mystery of the Stranger" deals with abducted kids. Mr. T and company track down a pair of kidnappers. Eventually, Mr. T catches one of them and with a Death Glare, offers the kidnapper a choice: face him or go to jail. The kidnapper begs to be thrown in jail.
  • An Accidental Hero example: In the 1936 Porky Pig short The Blow Out, Porky, here a young child, is trying to earn spending money by returning objects that grown-ups have dropped. He thus innocently chases a Mad Bomber around, repeatedly handing his activated Time Bomb back to him. The increasingly frazzled bomber finally runs voluntarily into an open police wagon, only for Porky to toss the bomb in after him.
  • The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes!. In the "Acts of Vengeance" episode, Baron Zemo and the remaining members of the Masters of Evil surrender themselves into the custody of the Avengers so they will have to protect them from the Enchantress who is on a Roaring Rampage of Revenge after she was betrayed in "This Hostage Earth".
  • A variant in Darkwing Duck: Megavolt and Quackerjack for once don't want to break out of the St. Canard Jail. Given that they're in an alternate future and that future's Darkwing has gone Knight Templar, they have a good reason.
  • In the old Polish cartoon Prosze Slonia, two thieves attempt to steal the tusks of the main hero, a white elephant named Dominik. However, after a number of painful failed attempts, they get so scared that they just beg the police to take them away.


Community Feedback Replies: 74
  • August 22, 2013
    CaveCat
  • August 22, 2013
    NESBoy
  • August 22, 2013
    Bisected8
    • In an episode of The Fresh Prince Of Bel Air, the Banks hire an ex-con as a servant while Jeffery's away. Eventually he decides to violate his parole and go back to jail rather than continue to work for Phil Banks.
  • August 22, 2013
    Chernoskill
    A "kinda" example:

    • In Dirty Harry, Scorpio demands a lawyer when Harry tortures him in the stadium.
  • August 22, 2013
    ChrisX
    What about this one:
    • In Teen Titans 4th season, Dr. Light faces Raven using her dark powers, whereas exposure to that in the 1st season reduced him into a shivering wreck. Upon seeing that thing again in the 4th season, Dr. Light goes from "No one defeats Dr. Light!" into "I'd like to go to jail now, please."
  • August 22, 2013
    justanotherrandomlurker
    Another Powerpuff Girls example:

    The Amoeba Boys avert this - they simply want to go to jail to prove they're as much of criminals as the other villains in Townsville.
  • August 22, 2013
    Larkmarn
    Jail Would Be Preferable?

    Current name A: Sounds like Trojan Prisoner and B: Is dialogue.
  • August 23, 2013
    kjnoren
    I think this can be broadened to when villains seek protection from the law against the protagonist or their companions. Maybe Cops Are The Lesser Evil?

    I think Pratchett subverted this in one of the watch books, with a criminal being apprehended by Angua while in dog form, but no idea which book it was, and I might be misremembering.

    Literature:

    • In the Honor Harrington short story What Price Dreams the control officer of an assassination attempt was detected and mobbed by treecats, to such a degree he screamed for help and made a full confession more or less on the spot to the rangers and bodyguards coming to the scene.
  • August 23, 2013
    DracMonster
    This doesn't exactly count, but I bet the trope could be expanded to encompass it:

    • In Silent Hill Downpour, the protagonist is an escaped prisoner. The Back Story gradually reveals that he had stolen a police car and gone on a joyride specifically to get into the prison that his son's molester/murderer was incarcerated in, for some stabbity revenge.

    Hmmm, actually now that I think twice, Incarceration Gambit (or whatever) probably would really be a different trope.
  • August 23, 2013
    Bisected8
  • August 23, 2013
    littlemissmuffet
    • In The Muppets Take Manhattan, a phony Broadway producer is about to be arrested for fraud when he takes Gonzo and Camilla hostage. After an attack from Animal, he begs to be arrested.

    • There have been a few "Dumbest Criminals" stories where the crook begs to be arrested after their criminal activities put themselves in mortal danger. i.e.: a car thief who slammed his fingers in the door of a car he was stealing, a burglar who got stuck in the chimney of a fast food place- just above a vat of frying oil, house breakers who tried to get in through the sewage system....
  • August 24, 2013
    FlyingDuckManGenesis
    @littlemissmuffet; I'd like to know what category the "Dumbest Criminals" stories belongs to before I decide to add it to this YKTTW.
  • August 24, 2013
    Astaroth
    • Variation in The Batman: In one episode, Penguin tries to hand himself over to Batman because an even more dangerous vigilante named 'Rumor' has begun attacking Gotham's criminal community. Everyone knows that criminals who cross Batman end up handed over to the police and arrested, but criminals Rumor targets are abducted and ever seen again, so Penguin decides a jail cell is the safest place he can be.
  • August 24, 2013
    randomsurfer
    Does This Count?
    • Barney Miller:
      • In one episode inveterate gambler Nick comes in crowing about a big score he had made: he picked all the bowl games, then bet it all on a hockey game and won there too. Then his bookie comes into the detetive squadroom and turns himself in for illegal betting: turns out everyone had had the same sting of luck and he can't cover his bets. And not everyone is as nice as Nick is.
      • In another episode a burgler had been caught and tried in a makeshift community court (which had been designed for small civil disputes) and had been serving his "sentence" locked up in the basement. He escapes and is picked up by the real cops; he's grateful to be in a real jail.
  • August 25, 2013
    Arivne
    ^^^ From the description, I assume they're from Real Life.
  • August 25, 2013
    kjnoren
    I don't think the criminal in self-inflicted trouble should go here - to me that's more Darwin Awards stuff. It must be a conscious action from a second party that causes the villain (whatever) to give themselves up to the law.
  • August 25, 2013
    Bisected8
    @kjnoren: If I recall correctly, you're thinking of Feet Of Clay, when a couple of crooks tried to take her hostage in a bar full of police officers. However, earlier the same crooks had this attitude towards being turned in to the Thieves Guild (who don't take kindly to un-licenced thieving) and begged to be arrested by Carrot.

    EDIT: She has a similar encounter in Jingo.
  • August 25, 2013
    Chabal2
    • Batman The Animated Series: After his encounter with the Creeper, The Joker surrenders to Batman, declaring the Creeper "a lunatic" without any irony whatsoever.
    • Inversion in Blake And Mortimer: When Olrik (who had been working for a rogue Soviet doctor) is arrested, he's his usual flippant self when Blake and Mortimer visit his cell, but when he learns he's being exchanged by the British police to the Soviets, he begs for them to prevent it.
  • August 25, 2013
    kjnoren
    Proposed new laconic (which hopefully can be shortened):

    Someone takes action against a criminal such that the criminal seek the protection of the law.

    Proposed new description:

    Cops Are The Lesser Evil happens whenever one or more criminals are caught, and the people catching them are sufficiently scary, threatening, or violent that the criminals seek the protection of the law, ie to be handed over to the cops, prosecutors, judges, and prisons. Usually, this means that the criminal make a confession more or less on the spot, though this can be omitted in a work.

    While superficially a great help to the justice system, this can cause all sorts of later difficulties. Eg, most legal systems place greater emphasis on statements under oath in the courtroom than on unrecorded statements in a confusing environment -- especially if it can be argued that the one doing the confession is threatened, coerced, or has been tortured.

    May be caused by Pity The Kidnapper, Unintentionally Notorious Crime, and Mugging The Monster. Contrast Perp Sweating (though some of the techniques used may be the same).

    Indexes: Threatening Tropes, Crime And Punishment Tropes, Perp Sweating
  • August 25, 2013
    MetaFour
    Yet another Batman example:

    Film
    • In Batman Begins, Dr. Jonathan Crane realizes that Batman is coming for him at Arkham Asylum. He instructs his mooks to call the police (who still consider Batman a dangerous vigilante at this point).
      Thug: What do we do?
      Jonathan Crane: What anyone does when a prowler comes around... call the police.
      Thug: You want the cops here?
      Crane: At this point, they can't stop us. But the Batman has a talent for disruption. Force him outside, the police will take him down. Go.
  • August 25, 2013
    DAN004
    So that is meant to be "protection of the law"? Then I got to think that, then, this trope is about a bad guy trying to make themselves looking "vulnerable" so that they can frame the heroes and make the heroes sentenced to prison. :P

    I'd up Prefer Jail To The Hero as the title.
  • August 26, 2013
    Larkmarn
    Prefer Jail To The Hero is a great name. Good job, whoever came up with it.
  • August 26, 2013
    313Bluestreak
    An interesting subversion is Cruel Mercy if the hero realizes that jail is too easy for the villain.
  • September 16, 2013
    BibsDibs
    Stand Up Comedy
    • Inverted by Christopher Titus. According to this joke, he once choose going to jail over being around his abusive (ex-)girlfriend.
  • September 17, 2013
    TBTabby
    In episode of Lupin The Third has Goemon's old rival Jinkuro murder their sensei, then turn himself in to police custody so Goemon won't be able to come after him. Lupin foils him by taking the place of the judge at his trial and removing all the evidence that would incriminate him.
  • September 17, 2013
    kjnoren
    ^^ That's not an inversion.
  • February 1, 2014
    Alvin
    Does This Count

    Live-Action TV: An episode of I Love Lucy ends with Lucy and others in jail. Ricky comes to bail them out and Lucy is walking out of the cell when what Ricky is saying makes her walk back into the cell and close the door, out of fear of Ricky.
  • February 1, 2014
    TwoGunAngel
    John Woo's The Killer has Wong Hoi doing this at the end of the movie to get away from Inspector Li Ying, who wants him dead for killing Ah Jong, the protagonist of the film. This results in Li gunning him down right in front of his fellow officers and then getting arrested.
  • February 1, 2014
    MaxWest
    An episode of Mister T titled "Mystery of the Stranger" deals with abducted kids. Mr. T and company track down a pair of kidnappers. Eventually, Mr. T catches one of them and with a Death Glare, offers the kidnapper a choice: face him or go to jail. The kidnapper begs to be thrown in jail.
  • February 1, 2014
    AliceMacher
    • An Accidental Hero example: In the 1936 Porky Pig short The Blow Out, Porky, here a young child, is trying to earn spending money by returning objects that grown-ups have dropped. He thus innocently chases a Mad Bomber around, repeatedly handing his activated Time Bomb back to him. The increasingly frazzled bomber finally runs voluntarily into an open police wagon, only for Porky to toss the bomb in after him.
  • February 2, 2014
    Arivne
    Namespaced and italicized work names.
  • September 15, 2014
    HeroGal2347
    At the end of one The Adventures Of Superman episode, one villain tells another he can call the police. "Better a hundred of those guys than Superman!"
  • September 15, 2014
    DAN004
    Is flyingduckman still there?
  • September 16, 2014
    jormis29
  • September 16, 2014
    HeroGal2347
    ^^ The villain who said the quote was the same as the guy who said to call the police. It was the same line. One villain moved to pick up the phone and the other said it was a good idea.
  • September 16, 2014
    TheWanderer
    Contrast The Mob Boss Is Scarier, where a criminal is so fearsome that no one will inform on them and will take jail time or other legal penalties rather than risk their wrath.
  • September 16, 2014
    DAN004
    ^^ Who are you talking to?
  • September 16, 2014
    Psi001
    • Played With case in The Ren And Stimpy Show episode "Pen Pals". While not villains per se, the duo decide jail is far more luxurious than their deadbeat life on the streets, so commit crimes and even try to break into jail to get a roof over their heads.
  • September 22, 2014
    HeroGal2347
    Another reason why he might prefer jail to the hero is if the hero is extremely scary rather than annoying. I see this has been mentioned in the comments, but it needs to be added to the main description as well.

    A variant in Darkwing Duck: Megavolt and Quackerjack for once don't want to break out of the St. Canard jail. Given that they're in an alternate future and that future's Darkwing has gone Knight Templar, they have good reason.
  • September 22, 2014
    Chabal2
    Many criminals let themselves be imprisoned so as to evade The Punisher (and depending on their status may end up in a Luxury Prison Suite). When that happens, Frank turns himself in, always getting sent to the same prison, and takes out the criminal (and the criminal's bodyguards, tough guys who want to show off, rival prison gangs, prisoners he runs into on the way, and his cellmate) before breaking out of the prison.
  • September 26, 2014
    littlemissmuffet
    • In the Death Of Superman story arc of the Superman comics, Batman catches a terrorist who was going to use Superman's funeral as an opportunity to assassinate a world leader. Batman caught him and said that in Superman's honor, he'd do things Superman's way. The assassin is left tied to a flagpole begging to be arrested because "Batman might come back!"
  • October 3, 2014
    HeroGal2347
    From elsewhere on This Very Wiki:

    Spider Man: After Grim Hunt, Doctor Octopus hires just about every villain in New York to capture Osborn's baby. After the newborn is seemingly killed, bad guys are scared enough to try to turn themselves in to the police to get away. It doesn't help.
  • October 4, 2014
    HeroGal2347
    Comic Strips should be split into Newspaper Comics and Comic Books.
  • October 5, 2014
    Arivne
    • Examples section formatting
      • Changed Comic Strips to Comic Books.
      • Namespaced work name(s).
      • Put the short story title What Price Dreams in quotes instead of italics as per Welcome To TV Tropes - Editing Articles.
      • Changed unnecessary double curly braces to Camel Case.
      • Corrected spelling (detetive, squadroom, burgler).
      • Added a space between asterisks and the first word following them.
  • October 13, 2014
    jormis29
    May I suggest that the title be changed to " Prefer Jail To Them " to cover examples like the Creeper from Batman The Animated Series.
  • October 13, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ "them"?
  • October 13, 2014
    jormis29
    ^ It is first non-specific term that came to mind since a few of the examples are not The Hero.
  • October 13, 2014
    HeroGal2347
    ^ Not to mention that not all the examples you have are "villain trying to hide from hero." Some are "villain trying to hide from other villain."

    Not all the examples have been added.
  • October 13, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ "villain trying to hide from other villain"

    The Mob Boss Is Scarier?
  • October 13, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ "villain trying to hide from other villain"

    The Mob Boss Is Scarier?
  • October 13, 2014
    HeroGal2347
    Well then, the The Batman and I Carly examples might have to go somewhere else.
  • November 22, 2014
    HeroGal2347
    Is the sponsor there to launch this?
  • November 23, 2014
    Arivne
    ^ The OP Flying Duck Man Genesis last edited a trope/work page on 11-20-14 (three days ago), so he's still on the Wiki. He has clearly forgotten about this proposal, however.

    You could send him a pm to ask him if he still wants to handle this one.
  • November 25, 2014
    HeroGal2347
    He says the description needs work before he'll launch it.
  • November 26, 2014
    HeroGal2347
    There are also examples that haven't been added.
  • November 26, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ Go add 'em
  • November 27, 2014
    Bisected8
    I'm not sure this quite fits this or an inversion/deconstruction of The Mob Boss Is Scarier (they were scared of the villain, but they went to the police for help and the hero was the one who brought about their misfotune), but;

  • ^ To be honest, despite the good points you made about whether or not it should be included, I'm pretty unsure whether to add it or not myself.
  • May 6, 2015
    f1shst1x
    • In season 2 of ''Sons Of Anarchy" Ethan Zobelle, the leader of an Aryan gang, is about to be executed by the Sons. When the police interrupt the crime, Zobelle quickly confesses to possessing a large amount of narcotics, knowing he will be safe in police custody.

    Also, can I suggest "Prefer Jail To The Alternative" as a name? That would include examples not covered by "Prefer Jail To The Hero."
  • May 7, 2015
    captainmarkle
    Corrected the link for The Joker.
  • May 7, 2015
    ZuTheSkunk
    • In the old Polish cartoon Prosze Slonia, two thieves attempt to steal the tusks of the main hero, a white elephant named Dominik. However, after a number of painful failed attempts, they get so scared that they just beg the police to take them away.
  • May 8, 2015
    Chabal2
    In The Mad Adventures Of Rabbi Jacob, Pivert tries to escape Slimane (and by extension, the assassins trying to kill both Slimane and Pivert) by insulting a cop. Slimane forces him to drive away, but the alert is put out for Pivert, leading to them having the cops on their trail in addition to the assassins.
  • August 9, 2015
    notShemp
  • August 28, 2015
    randomsurfer
    I think the title and description should be modified such that it no longer specifies that it must be the hero that the person is in fear of.

    Another Barney Miller
    • In one episode a young man comes into the squad room and confesses to robbing a liquor store, which is surprising because the owner of the store hadn't reported any robberies (and he's robbed an average of once every two months, so he's a known regular). It turns out that there's a rumor that the precinct is closing down and the liquor store owner had purchased protection, so the young hood is in fear for his life after robbing a place under protection. He figures it's safer with the cops.
  • August 28, 2015
    HeroGal2347
    Is Flying Duckman Genesis still interested?
  • August 29, 2015
    FlyingDuckManGenesis
    I am, and as previously mentioned, I would love to launch this YKTTW, but not before the description is expanded.
  • January 25, 2016
    captainmarkle
    Bump
  • January 25, 2016
    sgamer82
    • Jojos Bizarre Adventure villain Akira Otoishi is in prison for robbery, though he committed worse crimes that cannot be revealed due to The Masquerade. He's perfectly fine with this, since he's terrified of the alternative of Okuyasu and Josuke dealing with him for his more serious crimes of murdering Okuyasu's brother and trying to kill Josuke's father.
  • January 26, 2016
    FlyingDuckManGenesis
    Added example above and removed a hat due to this article's short description. The description needs more context before another hat can be added and the article can be launched.
  • January 26, 2016
    DAN004
    ^ Not all description needs to be long, just so you know.
  • March 13, 2016
    notShemp
    Bump
  • March 13, 2016
    HeroGal2347
    I wonder whether Prefer Jail To The Protagonist would be better. It for be a stretch to call (for instance) The Punisher or Darkwarrior Duck heroes.

    If you want more meat to the description, how about this:

    "A villain has plotted an Evil Plan, an evil plan so terrific he has no doubt in its completion. Nothing can stand in his way, not even that do-gooder coming down the street!

    But wait — suddenly he's stuck in the area with this guy for some time. Now the evil plan doesn't seem so important — all that's important is getting away from this nut, no matter how! Maybe the person is so loony he makes your head spin. Maybe he's so bratty he makes you pull your hair out (what hair he didn't pull out himself). In the worst cases, he may be so fearsome he makes your blood curdle and your hair stand up. Whatever the cause, nothing could be worse than being alone with him another minute. But where can you go? Back to jail!

    Note that this strategy does not always work. An extremely determined person may follow the villain back to the prison he's trying to go to escape from him. The point is, however, that prison isn't a concern for the bad guy anymore. all that matters is getting this annoyance/terror off his back."
  • March 13, 2016
    FlyingDuckManGenesis
    ^ Thanks for the description. I have added it and renamed the article.
  • March 13, 2016
    HeroGal2347
    ^ Glad you liked it. I took the liberty of removing the sentence about "another reason why" because it was already addressed in the main description and I figured it had been missed.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=zyarjacijch8vfox57azayf3