Created By: buckmana on December 17, 2017 Last Edited By: buckmana on February 10, 2018
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Financial Test Of Friendship

Rich Person A suddenly loses all their money and the extravagant lifestyle that goes with it, so less wealthy Friend B gives them a place to stay.

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With wealthy parents, there are always offspring who have never known a life other than privilege and extravagance. Then one day, the money is gone due to misfortune and suddenly they find themselves without money and their home is claimed as assets to pay off the debt, likely with most of their personal possessions.

Fortunately, they have a kind friend who is willing to look out for them in this time of hardship, proving that their relationship was never based on the perks of having a rich associate.

Interclass Friendships are the most common examples involved in this situation. The friend's actions can be considered a demonstration of Undying Loyalty.

The money is usually restored by the end of the episode. Expect Broke Episode plots to result from this scenario.


Examples:

Live-Action TV
  • Jessie: When the Ross' assets are frozen due to a tax accounting error, despite the fact she is no longer being paid to look after her charges, Jessie chooses to stay with the children during this crisis. Tony allows them to live in his apartment until the error is resolved.
  • A rare example of this trope being used as backstory rather than as a Status Quo Is God situation is Mortal Kombat: Conquest. When The Baron dies, Siro effectively loses his job as the Baron's bodyguard. Kung Lao lets Siro stay at the Trading Post to run the Trading Post with him and Taja, since the three of them became friends during the events of the first episode.
  • The Suite Life of Zack and Cody: Mr Tipton invests all of his money in a diamond mine that doesn't have any diamonds. When London's presidential suite and her valuable assets are seized by the bank as partial payment of the debt incurred, Maddie invites London to stay with her family. At the end of the episode, the mine yields a massive oil reserve and the Tipton fortune is restored.

Western Animation
  • DuckTales (1987). Repeated several times in the original series of Duck Tales, with many episodes occurring where Scrooge temporarily loses all his money. His staff (Duckworth, Mrs Beakley and Launchpad) all remain loyal to Scrooge despite him being unable to pay for their employment and often help him solve the dilemma needed to regain his fortune.
  • In The Simpsons episode "The Old Man and Lisa", bad investments cause Mr Burns to temporarily lose all his money and be thrown out of his mansion. His right hand man, Smithers tells him his best immediate action is to move in with him, even continuing to dote over him and refer to him formally as "Sir" despite Lenny now being his employer and Burns essentially being Smithers' lodger without rent pay.
Community Feedback Replies: 20
  • December 18, 2017
    Arivne
    • Capitalized the title.
    • Corrected spelling (looses, extragavant, extragavance).
    • Examples section
  • December 19, 2017
    HeroGal2347
  • December 19, 2017
    buckmana
    The above trope seems to be about a permanent living situation for the duration of the show's run.

    This trope is about a temporary occurrence, usually no more then the duration of one episode.
  • December 19, 2017
    HeroGal2347
    I wasn't aware ATTH had a time limit. At least it's a related trope, though.
  • December 19, 2017
    kjnoren
  • December 20, 2017
    Synchronicity
    ^Agreed.
  • December 20, 2017
    HeroGal2347
    I would say many examples of Adopted To The House are a specific form of A Friend In Need. I am not sure whether this is necessary; on the one hand, the fact that it specifically involves a rich person and their poorer friend makes it an amalgam of ATTH and Interclass Friendship, which could potentially be a subtrope. On the other hand, I am not sure whether it is a necessary subtrope.
  • December 20, 2017
    Omeganian
    See also Broke Episode
  • December 20, 2017
    Psi001
    • Repeated several times in the original series of Duck Tales with many a Broke Episode occurring where Scrooge temporarily loses all his money. Despite this his staff, Duckworth, Mrs Beakley and Launchpad all remain loyal to Scrooge despite him being unable to pay for their employment, and often help him solve the dilemma needed to regain his fortune.
    • In The Simpsons episode "The Old Man and Lisa", bad investments cause Mr Burns to temporarily lose all his money and be thrown out of his mansion. His right hand man, Smithers tells him his best immediate action is to move in with him, even continuing to dote over him and refer to him formally as "Sir" despite Lenny now being his employer and Burns essentially being Smithers' lodger without rent pay.

    Often a display of Undying Loyalty.

    Could this be referred to non-financial falls from grace as well? For example, The Transformers episode where Galvatron is overthrown as Decepticon leader but Cyclonus remains loyal to him.
  • December 20, 2017
    buckmana
    I hadn't thought of non-financial falls from grace such as the example stated above. I'll have to think some more about that and research the episode you identified.

    I think though, to qualify for this trope, Cyclonus would have to be providing some kind of support to Galvatron that isn't non-quantive, like sharing his energon supply, a base of operations or some other kind of refuge.

    I'm wary about linking this tropes to other similar tropes, because it seems like a Trope War is going on here and I prefer to stay out of those if possible.
  • December 20, 2017
    HeroGal2347
    Putting related tropes on a page is standard practice, I think. That way you can tell how a trope fits and contrasts with other tropes.
  • December 20, 2017
    buckmana
    From my perspective, I think the statement is being made that this trope isn't necessary because it's too similar to A Friend In Need and they don't want this one because of that reason. If the explanation had been phrased a different way, to explain how this trope is related and/or different, then I would be more receptive to connecting them.

    I'm considering making the connect to Adopted to the House and Interclass friendship as soon as I can work out what to write.

    Broke Episode I'm holding off for a later edit, after I write the above one. I really have no idea what to say there, so that also requires more thought.
  • December 20, 2017
    HeroGal2347
    I think if this one is different enough to be a subtrope (and I might advise going further with it before giving up) this would be a subtrope of A Friend In Need, specifically referring to financial problems and friendships between different "classes." A Friend In Need covers any situation in which a person helps even though they have no reason to help and nobody would blame them if they didn't (or at least that's the impression from the Laconic).
  • December 22, 2017
    AgProv
    Raj, in The Big Bang Theory, decides to assert his maturity and his independemce by refusing the financial support he gets from his wealthy father in India. He soon regrets this decision as he realises exactly how much he depended on family money and how his spendthrift ways have led him to run up huge debts. his friends get him to see his new realitiies and downsize him in every possible way to help him make ends meet. this extends even to finding him a new place to live after his appartment proves to be unaffordable.
  • January 2, 2018
    HeroGal2347
    Bump.
  • January 8, 2018
    buckmana
    From reading the description, it sounds like the Big Bang Theory isn't the correct scenario for this trope, it sounds like his friends are just giving Raj advice in how to live fiscally responsibly. It doesn't read as though he has temporarily lost his fortune and moved in with one of them until his fortune is restored.
  • January 10, 2018
    Arivne
  • January 9, 2018
    HeroGal2347
    2x ^ Though technically speaking, I remember the description saying that the loss doesn't have to be temporary, just that it usually is.
  • January 10, 2018
    buckmana
    Check the last line, the one referencing Status Quo.

    In any case, I meant that from reading the Raj example, it doesn't specify that he's temporarily living with any of his friends, it sounds like they're just moving him directly from an expensive apartment to a conservative one.
  • January 10, 2018
    CelestiaCadenceLuna
    • A rare example of this trope being used as backstory rather than as a Status Quo Is God situation is Mortal Kombat Conquest. When The Baron dies, Siro effectively loses his job as the Baron's bodyguard. Kung Lao lets Siro stay at the Trading Post and run the Trading Post alongside him (Kung Lao) and Taja, since the three of them became friends during the events of the first episode.
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