Created By: LadyJuse on April 23, 2013 Last Edited By: LadyJuse on April 30, 2013

Unorthodox Love Affirmation

A special way to for two people to say 'I love you'

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Trope
Sometimes, saying I love you is not enough. This is where the "Unorthodox Love Affirmation" comes in.

  • The Fault in Our Stars, two characters where seen making out and saying 'Always'. It also has one for the leading characters 'Okay'
  • Ghost: While he was alive, when Molly told Sam "I love you" he responded with "ditto," which ticked her off. After he became a ghost, he used this as a Trust Password to prove to Molly that he really was speaking through a psychic.
Community Feedback Replies: 25
  • April 23, 2013
    xanderiskander
    See: No New Stock Phrases. Having a list for all the times characters say "always" is no better than People Sit On Chairs. They can't be named after a stock phrase either.
  • April 23, 2013
    LadyJuse
    It's not for saying 'Always', it is for any example of people having a special way to say 'I love you'
  • April 23, 2013
    randomsurfer
    Then it Needs A Better Name.

    Ghost: While he was alive, when Molly told Sam "I love you" he responded with "ditto," which ticked her off. After he becomes a ghost, he uses this as a Trust Password to prove to Molly that it is really him speaking through a psychic.
  • April 23, 2013
    helterskelter
    I can see a trope for unique ways for characters to say I love you. Not for the specific word. I would also immediately take out the implication that something like the Supernatural one would work, because that tells me that we're going to see a lot of audience reactions of people assuming they mean "I love you".
  • April 24, 2013
    LadyJuse
    Keeping it "Always" until someone comes up with a better name.
  • April 24, 2013
    lexicon
    Does this include in Star Wars when Leia tells Han that she loves him and he says that he knows and in the next movie he tells her that he loves her and she says that she knows?
  • April 25, 2013
    Trueman001
    There is one such scene in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, where Harry is watching Snape's memories; Snape casts his Patronus for Dumbledore, to demonstrate that it has the same doe form as Lily Evans', leading to the exchange: "After all this time?" "Always."

    As for the trope name, I would suggest "Your Own Special Way" after the Genesis song.
  • April 25, 2013
    DunDun
  • April 25, 2013
    Duncan
    A Cut Song from Little Shop Of Horrors called "The Worse He Treats Me" had Audrey singing about how she knows Orin loves her because he hits her. There's a demo recording of the song on the most recent Cast Recording as a Bonus Track.
    The worse he treats me
    The more he loves me
    It sounds unusual I know
    But when he hurts me
    That's how he tells me
    That he would never let me go
  • April 25, 2013
    Larkmarn
    Unorthodox I Love You would work. But you really should change it to... almost anything else right now, because this is really bad so far.

    And yeah, yank the Supernatural example. That's just an Insult Of Endearment.

  • April 25, 2013
    DunDun
    Personally, I'd rather this not have a phrase in it, i.e., no subject-and-verb things. Unorthodox Love Confession?
  • April 25, 2013
    Larkmarn
    The problem with that is that a Love Confession heavily implies that it's a first-time-only thing. I was thinking of Unorthodox Declaration Of Love but ran into the same problem. Love Confession is even worse in that regard.
  • April 25, 2013
    DunDun
    ^True. Looking for synonyms of "delcaration": insistence, avowal (probably too rare), assertion, affirmation. Assertion and insistence don't carry the same connotation of "first time." I honestly don't care whether it's "x of love" or "love x," by the way.
  • April 25, 2013
    Larkmarn
    Yeah, I don't care about "x of Love" vs "Love x" either.

    I think Assertion works okay. I don't think there's anything wrong with having "I Love You" in it, but I'm not (heh) married to it.
  • April 25, 2013
    DunDun
    Y'never know what someone'll hang on to, is all I meant. And I'm just against phrases in trope names (makes it sound like it has to have that phrase in order to be the trope).
  • April 25, 2013
    lexicon
    I think Unorthodox Love Affirmation sounds best.
  • April 25, 2013
    MorningStar1337
    No New Stock Phares and People Sit On Chairs. Yeah I don't think this is a trope.
  • April 25, 2013
    MonaNaito
    Abnormal Affection Affirmation? Okay, that might be a little much. I do like Unorthodox Love Affirmation; Idiosyncratic Love Affirmation might also work.
  • April 25, 2013
    DunDun
    ^Well, if three people already agreed on the name change, it's not a stockphrase.

    The PSOC bit... it definitely can have a meaning for the characters. Asserting their love in such a way could denote that they are incredibly insecure about what they're saying. It could mean (a) there's something perfect about their relationship, (b) there's something wrong with their relationship that they haven't discussed yet, or (c) they're crazy for the other person.
  • April 25, 2013
    Larkmarn
    It's not a stockphrase.

    ... the way it's titled and the laconic makes it seem like it, and OP's decision to stick with said title makes it look that way, but it's not a stock phrase. Now, he didn't do a good job establishing the significance of the trope, but I don't think it's Chairs.
  • April 25, 2013
    LadyJuse
    Changing it to 'Unorthodox Love Affirmation' for the time being so people a better understanding of the trope
  • April 25, 2013
    lexicon
    Does the Han Solo and Princess Leia example count? The description needs more to it like what this means and links to other tropes.
  • April 25, 2013
    jbrecken
    In Princess Bride, Grandpa explains that when Wesley says "As you wish" to Buttercup he means "I love you." Grandpa later says it to his grandson.
  • April 29, 2013
    Marz1200
    • On Dollhouse Senator Perrin and his wife appear to have this. "You're my knight in shining armor." "And you're my beautiful damsel." This later turns out to be handler-active protocol for keeping Perrin in check.
  • April 30, 2013
    randomsurfer
    • Discussed in the play The Curious Savage:
      Mrs. Savage: What is wrong?
      Fairy May: Nothing. It's just that no one has said they loved me this livelong day.
      Mrs. Savage: Why, yes they have, Fairy.
      Fairy: Oh, no they haven't. I've been waiting.
      Mrs. Savage: I heard Florence say it at the dinner table.
      Fairy: Did she?
      Florence: Did I?
      Mrs. Savage: She said, "Don't eat too fast, Fairy."
      Fairy: Was that saying she loved me?
      Mrs. Savage: Of course. People say it when they say, "Take an umbrella, it's raining" - or "Hurry back" - or even "Watch out, you'll break your neck." There're hundreds of ways of wording it - you just have to listen for it, my dear.
      Fairy: (brightening) My dentist said I had perfect occlusion. Do you think he was telling me he loved me?
      Mrs. Savage: What else?
      Fairy: Oh, thank you. I've been missing so much. Oh! My dentist loves me!
    Used as a Call Back at the end of the show when Mrs. Savage is leaving, everyone else from the asylum hells her to not eat too fast, take an umbrella, etc.
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