Created By: KingZeal on October 20, 2011 Last Edited By: KingZeal on July 23, 2013
Troped

Unexpectedly Realistic Gameplay

You must solve a problem by doing the most obvious thing, but you didnt know you could do it.

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Trope
What happens when the Lord British Postulate collides with a puzzle.

This trope is what happens when a game intentionally averts a Omnipresent Trope or Necessary Weasel, or if the developers assume that players will know that their engine is Like Reality Unless Noted, or that one of the game's rules can be broken by design.

Imagine playing a First-Person Shooter and finding that NOT shooting the bloodthirsty enemies is the expected solution, and merely pointing your gun long enough without firing will scare them away with no body count. Since every shooter is designed to let you shoot enemies, why would you think this time would be different? Alternatively, imagine playing a Stealth Mission where you're supposed to show yourself to the enemy because surrender is the easiest method to get inside the base.

Or how about a Role-Playing Game where there's a Locked Door blocking your path; the expected trope is to run around until you locate a key. It's not common to ask the Axe-Wielding Barbarian or your strongest Fire Mage to chop or burn it down. Sure, most people would do that in Real Life, but how many videogame players would think to?

What? You didn't know any of that would work? How could you not? It's common sense!

The thing is that in Real Life, there are some things which are just obviously common sense. Fire burns. Ice is cold. Night is dark. You can't breathe underwater. Smashing your head on bricks won't produce coins. However, in videogames, the Physics Engine will not be 100% accurate to reality. No matter how realistic it may be, there will always be a few gameplay elements or physics which do not work like they do in Real Life.

This is justified in that building a physics engine requires work and resources, as well as an inherent understanding of how physics and sciences work. (For example, the team behind Red Faction Guerrilla actually studied architectural physics in order to perfect their destructible environments and it became harder to build the structures than to destroy them.) Also, like in other forms of media, the Law of Conservation of Detail is usually in play. After all, why would the player need think about exactly how much a pencil weighs while playing an Adventure Game? Because picking one up will help you weigh just enough to trigger that pressure plate which opens the door.

As always, Tropes Are Not Bad. There are a number of games in which part of the game is figuring out the rules, or in which changing the rules is necessary to win. This type of gameplay is simply not very common, which is why it tends to bamboozle and frustrate some players.

This can very easily crop up in tabletop RPGs if the players and/or GM just aren't thinking clearly enough. The players may come up with a simple solution to something the GM intended to be complex, the opposite may happen, or they both may not realize until afterwards that there could have been a much easier way to solve the problem.

Subtrope of Hidden in Plain Sight. Contrast Moon Logic Puzzle, in which the logic which solves the puzzle is so out there that there's no way it was obvious.

See also Noob Bridge, in which an obscure game mechanic is used suddenly and with no warning to the player. Usually found when The Dev Team Thinks of Everything, but the player doesn't.

Compare Cutting the Knot, Speak Friend and Enter, Boring but Practical, Mundane Solution, Reality Is Unrealistic, Outside-the-Box Tactic and Stating the Simple Solution. You Didn't Ask. You Can't Get Ye Flask is where you try to do this in a text parser-based game but your syntax isn't what the devs had in mind.

As this is a puzzle solutions trope, there are unmarked spoilers ahead.
[[foldercontrol]]

Gaming examples:

[[folder:Adventure Games]]
  • Old Adventure Games (Sierra Era and older) were all about this but their legacy was forgotten by the time games jumped 3D.
  • In Another Code, you have to press two maps together, one on the top screen and one on the bottom screen. To do so, you have to close and open the DS.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Action Adventure]]
  • The Legend of Zelda:
    • In general, swimming. It's fairly simple addition to the series and often taken for granted. However, many games (RPGs in particular) do not allow for this. So, should you find yourself cut off from your intended destination by a body of water, you have to find another way around, or a means to get across. Not so in Zelda. If all that stands between you and point B is a little water, well, what's stopping you? This is particularly noteworthy because in the first three games of the series, Link either took damage or died if he fell into water without a specific item that let him swim; the newer games usually require no such item.
    • In A Link to the Past the entrance to the dungeon in the Village of Outcasts is blocked by a trident held by a statue. There's no switches to open it and none of your items can break it, so how do you get past it? Just pull it off.
    • In The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass, you have to press two maps together--one on the top and one on the bottom screen. To do so, you have to close and open the Nintendo DS.
    • Twilight Princess:
      • In the City in the Sky, at one point Link enters a bottomless room guarded by two lizalfos. Simply take two steps forward into the room (after the door locks behind you) and both leap to their doom while trying to come after you.
      • Another Twilight Princess example is the second jousting match with King Bulblin. The first time, you rode Epona past his boar and swung your sword to knock him off, a la a proper joust. The second time you face him, he's wearing armor on his sides that protects him from sword swings. How do you properly joust him this time? Who said anything about jousting? Just pull out your bow and shoot him a few times in the chest.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Platformers]]
  • In Super Metroid, there's a pit of lava immediately to the left of the long platform where you just fought Crocomire, with a door on the other side of this pit that you must reach. You reach the door by using your newly-acquired Speed Booster to run along the platform and jump to boost your jumping distance. The game never told you beforehand that combining Super Speed and long jumping was possible, so the only way you could know about it is to just take a (literal) leap of faith.
  • In Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles for the NES, there's a gap between two platforms that is about as wide as your character and impossible to jump across, as the ceiling is too low and you end up hitting it and falling. The solution is to simply walk over it.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Role-Playing Games]]
  • In Hunter: The Reckoning, the final boss is a Lasombra Vampire. The Lasombra are a clan who specialize in turning darkness and shadows into physically controlled weapons and tendrils, and as a balance are particularly sensitive to bright light and sunlight. The Boss is in the top floor of it's hideout, a boarded up abandoned building that, three levels earlier, you entered during the day. The quick and easy way to defeat the vampire? Don't aim at him, instead aim at the boarded up windows behind him. Shatter the boards, the sun streams in, and he's toast. Possibly lampshaded in that if you aren't a particularly good shot, you might trigger this effect accidentally.
  • The Wild ARMs series in general is especially prone to this, and it's why some puzzles can get you stuck. One of the game manuals even advises that if you're stuck that you should look back for different colored tiles (that are actually switches) because the reason you may have not unlocked an area in a dungeon could be that you didn't notice you had to step on them.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Stealth-Based Games]]
  • Metal Gear:
    • In Metal Gear Solid, the fight against Psycho Mantis. He starts controlling Meryl and making her try to blow her brains out. The easiest way to stop her? Just put her in a choke hold to knock her out.
    • Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater has a mad, passionate love affair with this trope.
      • You have to open a locked door. How do you do it? Disguise yourself as a scientist, and knock.
      • The Fear constantly uses up all of his stamina to turn invisible and jump around. He replenishes it by finding food on the battlefield. Thus, Snake can leave his rotten or spoiled food around for The Fear to find and actually poison him with it!
      • The Pain attacks with a swarm of bees in water-filled caverns. And since everyone knows bees hate water, you can actually toss grenades into the water to splash him.
      • You can defeat The End by sniping him the first time he appears in a cutscene, thus skipping his entire boss fight. Barring that, you can also skip the fight entirely by just saving the game and leaving it alone for a few days. Since The End is over 100 years old, he'll actually die waiting for Snake to show up again!
      • You just ingested rotten food and don't have digestive medicine to counteract it, so what do you do? Well, just go to the Medical screen and start spinning Snake around until he gets dizzy and pukes it out!
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Text-Based Game]]
  • Giant parts of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy game. You have a headache? Take an aspirin.
  • In += 3: A Logical Adventure, a troll demands three items before he will allow the player to cross a bridge; the player must remove three articles of clothing (which, typically of interactive fiction games where they're not relevant to the plot, are not listed in the player's inventory) and give them to the troll.[[/folder]]

[[folder:Wide Open Sandbox]]
  • In Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas one of your missions as Carl is to date a chick in order to steal her key card to get access to a casino. In a game with some missions that won't even let you destroy your highly non-essential car without failing the mission, this mission has two options: Go on a couple of dates with her. Or just kill her. You won't fail anything, and the key card will be right there in her house.
[[/folder]]

Non-video game examples:

[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
  • Jason from FoxTrot once spent a week trying to defeat the Red Orb Guardian (see pic above). Paige instantly bypasses it by... bypassing it. Jason declares just walking past a menacing, powerful boss to win to be "counterintuitive," to which Paige asks him how many nanoseconds a day he spends in the real world. (See also Lord British Postulate.)
[[/folder]]
Community Feedback Replies: 81
  • October 20, 2011
    Routerie
    Sounds pretty cool, though I can't think of any examples.
  • October 20, 2011
    GlennMagusHarvey
    Another related trope is Reality Is Unrealistic.
  • October 20, 2011
    Stratadrake
    I have to question the tropability meter here.
  • October 20, 2011
    X2X
  • October 20, 2011
    GlennMagusHarvey
    Seen this happen but can't think of any examples at the moment.
  • October 20, 2011
    MiinU

    Video games

    • Twilight Princess has an instance of this in the City in the Sky. At one point Link enters a bottomless room guarded by two lizafols. Simply take two steps forward into the room (after the door locks behind you) and both leap to their doom while trying to come after you.
      • Bomb arrows are easily abused, allowing you to one-shot most enemies including armored targets (except Darknuts) at a distance; which saves time and energy spent z-targetting and makes hidden skills seem pointless. Makes sense, right?
  • October 21, 2011
    Chabal2
    Non-video game example: Jason from Fox Trot once spends a week trying to defeat the Red Orb Guardian (not seen but we are told it towers above you with fists like anvils with skulls littering the ground at its feet). Paige instantly bypasses it by... bypassing it. Jason declares just walking past a boss to win to be "freakishly counterintuitive", to which Paige asks him how many hours a day he spends in the real world.
  • October 21, 2011
    FalconPain
    Another Twilight Princess example is the second jousting match with King Bulblin. The first time, you rode Epona past his boar and swung your sword to knock him off, a la a proper joust. The second time you face him, he's wearing armor on his sides that protects him from sword swings. How do you properly joust him this time? Who said anything about jousting? Just pull out your bow and shoot him a few times in the chest.
  • October 21, 2011
    Koveras
    Old Adventure Games (Sierra Era and older) were all about this but their legacy was forgotten by the time games jumped 3D.
  • October 21, 2011
    Trismegustis
    Related trope is The Dev Team Thinks Of Everything. Maybe the distinction should be that it's this if the primary solution to the puzzle is something they didn't tell you that you can do?
  • October 21, 2011
    MiinU
    • Also under Zelda examples: swimming. It's fairly simple addition to the series and often taken for granted. However, many games (rpg's in particular) do not allow for this. So, should you find yourself cut off from your intended destination by a body of water, you have to find another way around, or a means to get across. Not so in Zelda. If all that stands between you and point B is a little water, well, what's stopping you?
  • October 21, 2011
    Stratadrake
    I don't think "common sense" is a good name. Maybe Obvious Solution Gameplay? Where the solution is makes obvious sense once you realize it, but under the circumstances might take awhile to actually realize it.

    BTW, the "might" element also makes this YMMV.

    For personal example, I became stuck for more than an hour in the Master Quest Dodongo's Cavern because I forgot how rolling into a crate makes it shatter (and one puzzle requires collecting Silver Rupees, two of which are in such crates).
  • October 21, 2011
    GlennMagusHarvey
  • October 21, 2011
    KingZeal
    I like the latter one, but I'll wait to see if we can get a few more examples.
  • October 21, 2011
    GlennMagusHarvey
    Yes, this might very well be a YMMV thing. For example, people who are used to playing old platformers where you can use fire underwater (such as Super Mario Bros) might find it unexpected that the Team Fortress 2 Pyro's flamethrower doesn't work underwater. (Then again there are various old games that don't let fire effects work underwater either...)
  • October 28, 2011
    arromdee
    The Twilight Princess example sounds like Reality Ensues.
  • October 28, 2011
    nraustinii
    In The Secret of Monkey Island, when Guybrush is tied to the Fabulous Idol and thrown into the ocean, the solution is to pick up the idol.
  • October 28, 2011
    ChrisMD123
    Giant parts of the Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy text-based game. You have a headache? Take an aspirin.
  • October 28, 2011
    peccantis
    Obviously common sense -> Captain Obvious pothole needs to go. That sentence has nothing to do with the trope, not to mention the fact there's this whole "down with gratuitous potholes" kind of thing going on with PotholeMagnets.
  • November 14, 2011
    GlennMagusHarvey
    Bumping this--not my YKTTW, but this seems like a worthy phenomenon to document.
  • November 16, 2011
    Rytex
    Zelda's The Wind Waker. In the Forsaken Fortress, you can get captured and put in prison, and the room looks completely secure. But, in a surprising twist (and lampshade), you have to break a pot on top of a bookcase to reveal the way out.
  • November 20, 2011
    KingZeal
    ^ More context needed please. In what way is breaking the pot not obvious to the player?
  • November 20, 2011
    Rytex
    Well, Zelda is known for its puzzles. Suppose you play a game series for so long you expect puzzles to get more and more difficult with each game. Well, I happened to be stuck in that cell for an hour, trying to find a way out, until I felt like smashing the pot. When I did, I found the exit. There's a moment where, in the Prima Guide for Twilight Princess, the editors were stuck in a prison cell and they couldn't figure out how to get out because they thought the puzzle would be a lot harder than just smash a crate on the side of the room.
  • January 29, 2012
    yogyog
    I don't think that last one counts as unexpectedly realistic. In the real world it would be virtually imposable to hide a hole in a wall that is big enough to crawl through behind a jug. And to fit through the hole you'd have to climb up a book-case without it falling over. It would be more likely to have a door hidden behind a book-case.
  • April 28, 2012
    DVAcme
    • Another MGS example: the fight against Psycho Mantis. He starts controlling Meryl and making her try to blow her brains out. The easiest way to stop her? Just put her in a choke hold to knock her out.
    • In Snake Eater, you just ingested rotten food and don't have digestive medicine to counteract it, what do you do? Well, just go to the Medical screen and start spinning Snake around until he gets dizzy and pukes it out!

    By the way, KingZeal, since this trope can spoil some of the solutions to game puzzles, I think it should have a Spoiler Warning.
  • April 28, 2012
    Stratadrake
    What makes any of those examples? The Snake Eater one is actually just an easter egg relating to the game's Fourth Wall.
  • April 28, 2012
    KingZeal
    No, they're examples.
  • July 30, 2012
    BOFH
    Interactive Fiction
    • In +=3 (don't know how to wikify that), a troll demands three items before he will allow the player to cross a bridge; the player must remove three articles of clothing (which, typically of interactive fiction games where they're not relevant to the plot, are not listed in the player's inventory) and give them to the troll.
  • July 30, 2012
    Ashseti
    Videogames: In Hunter: The Reckoning for the Xbox, the final boss is a L Asombra Vampire. The Lasombra are a clan who specialize in turning darkness and shadows into physically controlled weapons and tendrils, and as a balance are particularly sensitive to bright light and sunlight. The Boss is in the top floor of it's hideout, a boarded up abandoned building that, three levels earlier, you entered during the day. The quick and easy way to defeat the vampire? Don't aim at him, instead aim at the boarded up windows behind him. Shatter the boards, the sun streams in, and he's toast. Possibly lampshaded in that if you aren't a particularly good shot, you might trigger this effect accidentally.
  • July 31, 2012
    ArkadyDarell
    This can very easily crop up in Tabletop Games RPGs if the players and/or GM just isn't thinking clearly enough. Either the players come up with a simple solution to something the GM intended to be complex, or vice versa, or they both don't realize until after that there could have been a much easier way to solve the problem.
  • July 31, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    This seems to be games requiring or rewarding fighting dirty.
  • August 1, 2012
    KingZeal
    No it isn't. Some the examples have nothing to do with fighting.
  • August 1, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ But what's the point then? It just seems to be gushing over gameplay elements that are supposedly realistic.
  • August 1, 2012
    Luc
    It's about solutions (sometimes alternate, sometimes the only ones) that are realistic, but rely on something outside the game's usual logic.
  • August 1, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ Well how do you determine that?

    And if there is a good answer, the name needs work, as calling something "realistic" is often seen as license to treat it as inherently better (we've had to rename some tropes due to that).
  • August 1, 2012
    Rognik
    I would suggest a change to "Unexpected Obvious Gameplay", except that these solutions might not seem that obvious. However, if looked at from a reality perspective, this solution is obvious but not in line with the gameplay options, that would be an objective perspective to view this trope.
  • August 2, 2012
    KingZeal
    ^^ It clearly says in the description that this trope will likely be YMMV.

    ^ "Obvious" won't work because it's counterintuitive to the trope's purpose. The entire point is that the solution required isn't obvious. Most likely because it breaks some well-established gaming trope. For example, let's take a Plotline Death, but the player can resurrect said character with a healing item without ever being told this is possible. That should be obvious, but because Plotline Death is pretty much an Omnipresent Trope in gaming and because Gameplay And Story Segregation is the norm, it isn't obvious at all.
  • August 2, 2012
    billybobfred
  • August 2, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^^ Well looking at the examples, it seems to be all over the place. There doesn't seem to be a theme other than "I didn't know I could do this", which isn't even much of an audience reaction.
  • August 2, 2012
    KingZeal
    I don't see a problem. Can you elaborate?
  • August 2, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ Well some of these examples are already covered under The Dev Team Thinks Of Everything. Other things are just gameplay elements and exploits that aren't stated directly.

    So how is this even an audience reaction?
  • August 2, 2012
    KingZeal
    They aren't "covered" by those that trope so much as the trope talks about a different point altogether.

    Though, you have a point in that this may be too subjective for examples.
  • August 2, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    There might be an objective trope in that certain minor gameplay aspects aren't stated in the manual or tutorials, but some parts of the game make you discover them. Noob Bridge covers the major gameplay elements, but this could be little things, like the gameplay equivalent of an Easter Egg.

    So in Super Metroid, dash jumping and wall bouncing are hidden gameplay elements.
  • August 3, 2012
    KingZeal
    That wasn't what this trope was meant to be.

    This trope was basically for some sort of puzzle or challenge in which the only way to solve it is to do something which either defies conventional gaming wisdom (using a healing item for Plotline Death) or knowing that physics in the game were made to be Like Reality Unless Noted.

    That said, wall-bouncing doesn't count for two reasons. One, it isn't exactly hidden. There's an Easter Egg in the game that teaches you how to do it. Two, it's not something the layperson would consider to solve a problem. Maybe Jackie Chan, but not the average person.

    Long-jumping, however, nearly every person on Earth knows about. Even a child will know that running and jumping result in a longer jump. However, this is not true in games unless specifically programmed to be, and Super Metroid never teaches you as much. They show you how to shinespark (rocket in one straight line) but not long jump.

  • August 3, 2012
    Arutema
    Also in Metal Gear Solid 3, you have to open a locked door. How do you do it? Disguise yourself as a scientist, and knock.
  • August 3, 2012
    TBTabby
    In A Link To The Past, the entrance to the dungeon in the Village of Outcasts is blocked by a trident held by a statue. There's no switches to open it and none of your items can break it, so how do you get past it? Just pull it off.
  • August 3, 2012
    EdgeOfDreams
    How about "Unexpected Mundane Solution" as a name?

    I do like the concept of this trope, but it's clearly tough to explain it and narrow it down enough to make it distinct from tropes like Guide Dang It.
  • August 3, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^^^^ Well even giving that, it's going to be hard for some to agree on what is "realistic" here, since, well, Reality Is Unrealistic.

    Plus the point seems to be (and correct me if this is wrong) "I didn't know I could do that" plus "this thing I can do is realistic", which still kind of seems like a gushing excuse, since some seem to think "realistic = better".
  • August 3, 2012
    StevenT
    Not sure if this is related but...

    • In Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles on NES, there's a gap between two platforms that is about as wide as your character and impossible to jump across, as the ceiling is too low and you end up hitting it and falling. The solution is to simply walk over it.
  • August 4, 2012
    1810072342
    In Zelda: Phantom Hourglass, you have to press two maps together- one on the top and one on the bottom screen. To o so, you have to close and open the DS.
  • August 5, 2012
    Omicron
    In Grand Theft Auto San Andreas one of your missions as Carl is to date a chick in order to steal her key card to get access to a casino. In a game with some missions that won't even let you destroy your highly non-essential car without failing the mission, this mission has two options: Go on a couple of dates with her. Or just kill her. You won't fail anything, and the key card will be right there in her house. (Since the game doesn't actually tell you you can kill her, I think it fits this trope).
  • April 20, 2013
    Koveras
    Bump.
  • April 20, 2013
    1810072342
    ^^^ (Polarbear2217's comment) Actually, that was Another Code on the DS. But yeah, the idea was the same.
  • April 20, 2013
    Noaqiyeum
    The paragraph linking to games with mutable and concealed rules should probably also link to Puzzle Thriller.
  • April 20, 2013
    StarSword
    ^^Fixed.

    ^Potholed "a number of games" to it.
  • April 20, 2013
    StarSword
    Quit killing the redlink, Lumpenprole; the idea is to encourage people to create a work page for it.
  • April 20, 2013
    xanderiskander
    Role Playing Game
    • Wild Arms: The Wild Arms series in general is especially prone to getting you stuck this way. One of the game manuals even advises that if you're stuck that you should look back for different colored tiles (that are actually switches) because the reason you may have not unlocked an area in a dungeon could be that you didn't notice you had to step on them.
  • April 20, 2013
    xanderiskander
    this is very much a subtrope of Hidden In Plain Sight
  • April 20, 2013
    randomsurfer
    According to an Urban Legend NASA spent millions of dollars trying to create a pen which could write in zero-g (since there's no gravity to make the ink run to the bottom of the pen); the Soviet NASA-equivalant agency just used pencils.
  • April 21, 2013
    oneuglybunny
    Comic Books
    • Marvel Comics' The Watcher has his home on moon. It appears as a featureless dome without doors or windows. The Fantastic Four have been there; to enter, simply walk through the wall.
  • April 21, 2013
    randomsurfer
    Please discuss the difference between this and Speak Friend And Enter.
  • April 22, 2013
    Damr1990
  • April 22, 2013
    KingZeal
    Oh hey!

    Thanks for adopting this.
  • April 22, 2013
    StarSword
    ^You're welcome.

    @randomsurfer: That's actually a really good question and I'm honestly not sure. (Didn't know that existed.)
  • April 22, 2013
    KingZeal
    Neither did I.

    But, it seems to me that this trope should exclusively be about situations where there's no reason to assume physics or logic work Like Reality Unless Noted. Usually because of some sort of Omnipresent Trope or Necessary Weasel across the medium, genre, mechanics or mission.

    For example, if you're playing an action game as a Hollywood Action Hero, would you think that NOT shooting your enemies would be a viable solution? Or if the game's had you shoot every other enemy, why would you think this one boss would be different?
  • April 22, 2013
    StarSword
    ^Might be a good way to go about it.

    You want your trope back? 'Cause between the Trope Repair Shop and exams I've got my hands full for the next couple of weeks.
  • April 25, 2013
    KingZeal
    If there's no other qualms, launching this within the next 48 hours.
  • April 25, 2013
    DunDun
    I really think the "compare/contrast and see also" tropes need better organizing and context. Pile all the compare tropes in a paragraph followed by contrast tropes and explain their connections. It might not really need context (given how many tropes are being compared with this one), but it certainly does need better organizing.
  • April 25, 2013
    MetaFour
  • April 25, 2013
    1810072342
    If we haven't mentioned this already, see Speak Friend And Enter.
  • June 30, 2013
    MiinU
    bump.
  • June 30, 2013
    Chabal2
    • There's a story on thedailywtf about a thread started by a guy who rode his bike to work and wanted something to keep his hands warm. The engineers immediately started brainstorming various ways to implement electrical heating devices in the handgrips. Then one guy put a stop to the whole thing by basically going "Wear gloves".
    • The Eldar stronghold in Dawn Of War: Dark Crusade is widely regarded as one of the most difficult missions in the game, due to the Eldar's heavily fortified entrenched position, teleporting units in the middle of your base, blatant cheating by regularly receiving fully-reinforced squads and ignoring the limit cap for the best non-relic tank in the game. However, by far the easiest (and the way you're supposed to do it) route is to capture the three giant webway portals that are located outside the base and can easily be defended against recapture.
  • June 30, 2013
    azul120
    • In the Adventure Time episode, Slumber Party Panic, Princess Bubblegum is puzzling over an equation key to her serum, until Finn happens to solve it on a totally unrelated yet critical occasion. Said equation? 2 + 2 = ?. The princess was "too smart to see it".
  • June 30, 2013
    Jokubas
    Most of Mc Pixel's challenges are Moon Logic Puzzles, as part of the game's humor, making it even more unexpected when they decide to use this trope instead.
  • July 16, 2013
    KingZeal
    Aside from updating the new examples, are there any other issues to discuss about this trope?
  • July 16, 2013
    DAN004
    We Have This I Swear - Mundane Solution. Stating The Simple Solution is related.

    Though that deals with general examples in any medium, so if we're going to limit it into videogames, I support the title Unexpectedly Realistic Gameplay.
  • July 16, 2013
    KingZeal
    Sounds good to me. That was the original trope I intended anyway
  • July 22, 2013
    KingZeal
    Needs more hats for launch, please.
  • July 23, 2013
    KingZeal
    Bumping for more hats and/or examples.
  • July 23, 2013
    MiinU
    • Despite being and action/rpg, Pandora's Tower has fairly realistic gameplay. For example:
      • When fighting near ledges and balconies, you can use the Oraclus Chain to toss enemies into chasms and automatically win the fight. But this goes both ways. Since enemies have items that can be looted off them afterwards, if you toss them into the abyss, their items go with them.
      • You can also use the Oraclus Chain to bind their arms and legs, temporarily preventing them from being able to fight back. You can even tether them to posts to limit their range of movement.
      • Items and equipment can break if you take damage, and must be repaired, or else their effectiveness is reduced. And some itmes can't be used at all if they're broken.
  • July 23, 2013
    KingZeal
    That doesn't seem to be what this trope is. This trope isn't just "this game has gameplay like reality". It's "this game has gameplay like reality that goes against the rest of the genre, and doesn't tell you it's there".
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=xz2n8oxs8nhwcodtmtg78nil&trope=UnexpectedlyRealisticGameplay