Created By: DawnwingJanuary 1, 2013 Last Edited By: DawnwingJune 3, 2014
Troped

Inertial Impalement

Enemy charges at the hero and gets impaled on something pointy.

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Trope

A good defense is a best offense? A good offense is a best defense? Why not both?

This is the situation involving an enemy charging at you and you then defensively put a nasty, pointy surprise in front of you. Result: The enemy runs onto the pointy end, and there may be a moment where the hero and their enemy stare at each other before they reveal that the foe has just killed themselves. By waiting until the last moment to reveal the victor of the battle - when the hero and the enemy are close enough to touch - the situation comes to an exciting and dramatic conclusion.

This trope does not apply to every impalement. It only applies if the enemy is impaled by his own momentum without the defender needing to move from their positions.

Sub-trope of Impaled With Extreme Prejudice, Inertia Is A Cruel Mistress, and when the one impaled is a villain, Self Disposing Villain. Also a subtrope of Deadly Dodging, for when the dodging results in the enemy impaling himself on something. See also Bullfight Boss.

As this is often a Death Trope, all Spoilers will be unmarked ahead. Beware.


Examples

Anime and Manga
  • One scene in Fist Of The North Star shows the villain's fortifications, including sharpened trees thicker than a man's arm. Later on the downtrodden villagers storm the villain's base, and one guy is shown to have somehow impaled himself at least three feet on one of the stakes.
  • Berserk. Casca scored her first kill this way. This happened when the nobleman, who had supposedly taken her under his wing, tried to rape her. Griffith offered his sword to Casca so she had something to defend herself with, but since at the time Casca was just an ordinary peasant girl, she couldn't have killed the nobleman without this trope. Casca even lampshades this herself:
    I don't know whether I stabbed him or if he fell onto the blade. It was my first kill. I was so scared I couldn't cry and couldn't move. I just gripped the bloody sword tightly.

Comic Books
  • Black Moon Chronicles. By waiting until the last possible moment to lift up their pikes, a group of pikemen under Murata are able to completely destroy a line of charging knights.
  • This is how Redlance from Elf Quest got his tribe name in his Back Story. He later repeated it with an attacking troll just before the Castle War.

Film - Animated
  • In Legend Of The Guardians The Owls Of Ga Hoole, happens at the climax of the final battle: Soren gets knocked onto the ground, his flaming stick nearby. As Metalbeak flies at him, battle claws extended, Soren grabs the stick and points it at Metalbeak, who flies onto it.
  • In the movie Brother Bear, Kenai is fighting a bear and gets knocked on the ground. When it charges at him, he grabs his spear. Rather than showing what happens, it shows the mountain from a distance and the viewer hears the bear roar one last time, and then it shows that Kenai has survived.

Film - Live Action
  • In the film of The Hobbit, a Warg runs at Bilbo and he kills it by holding out his sword, Sting.
  • Averted in The Two Towers: The Rohirrim cavalry charges down a steep incline where orc pikemen are massing. However, the sun rises just in time for them to be dazzled, and the charge completely breaks the line apart.
  • At the climax of Star Trek Nemesis, Picard inflicts this on Shinzon with a piece of broken-off metal.
  • Invoked in Braveheart when the Scots counter an English cavalry charge by getting them to crash into a wall of crude pikes.
  • Fright Night (1985). A vampirized Evil Ed (in wolf form) is attacking Peter Vincent. A wooden bannister railing is broken and Peter grabs a piece of it. When Evil Ed charges he is impaled on the wooden pole, returns to human form and apparently dies.
  • In the final battle of Pacific Rim, Raiju, a Lightning Bruiser Kaiju who has already ripped off one of Gipsy Danger's arms, charges at the crippled Jaeger with incredible speed. Gipsy, however, deploys the sword in its other arm and pierces it out just before Raiju hits it. The results are gory... and glorious.
  • In Ten Thousand BC, this is how D'Leh kills the mammoth. When his spear gets stuck in the ground, he runs away, leading the beast to impale itself. But in this case D'Leh feels bad because he didn't really kill the mammoth himself, as the one who could kill it would get the White Spear, and more importantly, would be allowed to marry Evolet. He also does it to the terrorbirds, this time intentional.
  • In Snowpiercer, the tall bearded guy is pierced by a metal rod that Yona puts in his way.

Literature
  • At the climax of the Warrior Cats book Sunset, Brambleclaw is fighting his evil half-brother, Hawkfrost. He'd just saved his leader from a fox trap by digging up the stake holding it in the ground, so he picks up the stake in his mouth and swings it around. Hawkfrost lunges at him and impales himself on the spike. Brambleclaw is shocked and gasps "Hawkfrost! I... I didn't want this."
  • Gor series
    • In Blood Brothers of Gor a Fantasy Counterpart Culture Plains Indians war between two tribes uses this. The "good" tribe sets up a series of battlements, each taller than the last but none of them too terribly impregnable. The "bad" tribe jumps over them on their horses, only to fall into a pit of sharpened sticks where they're impaled.
    • In another Gor book, Tarl kills a Larl (basically a lion or tiger the size of a small elephant) by getting it to charge at him while he's holding a spear with the butt firmly stuck in the ground.
  • This is how Sam is able to seriously wound Shelob in The Lord Of The Rings. The book explicitly states that he hadn't the strength to pierce her hide, but her forcibly falling on him did.
  • Andre Norton's Judgment on Janus. After Niall/Ayyar falls into a kalcrok's trap, the kalcrok jumps at him to try to pin him to the wall. It is impaled on his sword, (which he happened to be holding in front of him), killing it.

Live Action TV
  • One episode of The Twilight Zone is "The Once And Future King," wherein Gary Pitkin, an Elvis impersonator, gets transported to 1953, where he meets the real Elvis Presley. At first, Elvis thinks Gary is his stillborn brother Jesse, Back From The Dead. However, when Gary begins coaching Elvis about his music, Elvis is reviled. The two men begin to fight, breaking a guitar at the neck. Then Elvis lunges at Gary; Gary rolls aside, and Elvis impales himself fatally on the jagged guitar neck.
  • Star Trek The Original Series first pilot episode "The Menagerie". During the illusionary battle between Captain Pike and a Rigelian warrior, Pike is kneeling in a courtyard holding up a broken spearhead braced against the ground. The warrior jumps down on him and impales himself on the spearhead. Watch it here.
  • Friday The13th The Series episode "Night Prey". A vampire hunter attacks a vampire but the vampire knocks him down. The vampire then leaps onto the man but is impaled on a crucifix the man is holding up, killing it. Watch it here.

Tabletop Games
  • Early editions of Dungeons And Dragons: If a PC set a long weapon (such as a spear) in preparation for an opponent's charge and succeeded in hitting the charging opponent, they would do double normal weapon damage, possibly killing the opponent.
  • Chaosium's Elf Quest RPG. Characters with long thrusting weapons (such as spears) can set them to receive the impact from a charge.
  • Earthdawn Combat chapter. One of the techniques in the Mounted Combat section is "Setting Against A Charge". If a character knows a Charging Attack is coming and has a spear or lance available, he can make a Melee Weapons Test. If he succeeds, he hits the charging opponent and does damage before the opponent can attack. If he succeeds really well he can knock the opponent off his steed.

Video Games
  • Warcraft III. Orc buildings can be outfitted with spikes that damage melee attackers, implied to be this trope. Some units (Crypt Lords, turtles) have an ability that does the same (and in the Crypt Lord's case, gives it extra armor).

Western Animation
  • In the animation of Brian Jacques' book Martin the Warrior, Martin's sword falls from Badrang's paws and into the prison pit. Martin dives for it and holds it up, and when Badrang leaps into the pit after him, he gets impaled on it.
  • Parodied & Downplayed example: On The Simpsons when Bart & Lisa get into a fight. Bart is leaving Lisa's room.
    Bart: OK, but on my way, I'm going to be doing this: (windmills arms) If you get hit, it's your own fault.
    Lisa: OK, then I'm going to start kicking air like this. (kicks) And if any part of you should fill that air, it's your own fault.
    (they walk towards each other, then start fighting)
    Marge: (in the kitchen) Oh, I better go check that out. Now Homer, don't you eat this pie!
    Homer: OK...(Marge leaves) All right, pie, I'm just going to do this. (chomps air) And if you get eaten, it's your own fault! (walks towards pie, chomping air, and hits head on range hood) Ow! Oh, my — aw, to hell with this. (grabs pie, eats it)
  • Samurai Jack. Several enemies are defeated this way, notably in "Jack and the Spartans" (see phalanx formation in Real Life) and one where a charging elephant robot keeps going after running over Jack holding his sword in the air and its guts spill out from its belly.

Real Life
  • Truth In Television. Spear walls/phalanx formations existed because of this.
  • This is how boar spears work, as the tactic for boar hunting involves getting a rampaging boar to charge in the direction of the hunter and impale itself on the spear.
  • Porcupines, upon being threatened, will roll up and stick up its thorns, harming anything that come to harm it. Same happens with porcupine puffer fishes.

Community Feedback Replies: 103
  • January 2, 2013
    Arivne
    Tabletop RPG
    • Early editions of Dungeons And Dragons. If a PC set a long weapon (such as a spear) in preparation for an opponent's charge and succeeded in hitting the charging opponent, they would do double normal weapon damage, possibly killing the opponent.

    One of the Elf Quest examples under Comic Books on Impaled With Extreme Prejudice may be this trope:

    "During the same battle referred to above Redlance uses the same technique on a charging troll, who has time to see it coming."
  • January 2, 2013
    Antigone3
    Drizzt Do'Urden scored his first giant-kill that way, if I'm remembering correctly. He yelled insults in giantish to get the giant to charge, then popped up a long spear.

    (It would be in the Dark Elf Trilogy, after he moved to the surface, if anyone has the books handy to check.)
  • January 2, 2013
    StarSword
    Film:

    EDIT: Left a word out.
  • April 4, 2013
    Dawnwing
    I actually forgot I had made this; I'd done it late at night after coming home from seeing The Hobbit, but then when re-watching the movie last night I remembered it. Anyway, I've added those examples, except for the Elf Quest one (which I'll remove from the Impaled page after I launch) and the Dark Elf Trilogy one since you weren't sure (though if nobody knows, I'll just add it later and someone reading the page would fix it if it's wrong.)
  • April 4, 2013
    Dawnwing
    Anyway, possible page images - which one of these is better? Or is there another one you prefer?

    Martin from Redwall:

    Kenai from Brother Bear:


  • April 4, 2013
    Chabal2
    • Black Moon Chronicles: by waiting until the last possible moment to lift up their pikes, a group of pikemen under Murata are able to completely destroy a line of charging knights.
    • Averted in The Two Towers film: The Rohirrim cavalry charges down a steep incline where orc pikemen are massing. However, the sun rises just in time for them to be dazzled, and the charge completely breaks the line apart.
    • One scene in Hokuto No Ken shows the villain's fortifications, including sharpened trees thicker than a man's arm. Later on the downtrodden villagers storm the villain's base, and one guy is shown to have somehow impaled himself at least three feet on one of the stakes.
    • Warcraft II: orc buildings can be outfitted with spikes that damage melee attackers, implied to be this trope. Some units (Crypt Lords, turtles) have an ability that does the same (and in the Crypt Lord's case, gives it extra armor).
  • April 5, 2013
    StarSword
    Film:
    • Invoked in Braveheart when the Scots counter an English cavalry charge by getting them to crash into a wall of crude pikes.
  • April 5, 2013
    UltramarineAlizarin
    ^^^ I prefer the Redwall pic since it shows both defender and attacker. Goes with the imagery of the trope description pretty well too.
  • April 5, 2013
    PrinceofSavoy
    I'd call this Truth in Television, spear walls/phalanx formations existed because of this. I'd call it, "Momentum Meets Spear" or "Inertia Sucks,Spears Impale".
  • April 5, 2013
    StarSword
    Inertia Impales Idiot? No, that's stupid; how about Inertial Impalement?
  • April 5, 2013
    MrBucket
    Three Hundred that kid at the beginning does this to a wolf.
  • April 6, 2013
    Arivne
    Film
  • May 20, 2013
    Dawnwing
    Added examples, now that school's done for the semester I want to get this moving. Any more opinions on the pictures (which I finally figured out how to put in a reply properly) or on the possible names?
  • May 21, 2013
    MonaNaito
    Real Life
    • This is how boar spears work, as the tactic for boar hunting involves getting a rampaging boar to charge in the direction of the hunter and and impale itself on the spear.

    Impaled By Charging?
  • May 21, 2013
    Larkmarn
    Pretty sure the Three Hundred example had the wolf get stuck trying to charge the kid when he lead it into a crevice, then he just stabbed it.
  • May 21, 2013
    DracMonster
  • May 22, 2013
    Larkmarn
    That doesn't seem like it would be this trope, since he's still the one doing the intentional impaling.
  • May 22, 2013
    Melkior
    Comic Books:
    • This is how Redlance from ElfQuest got his tribe name in his backstory. He later repeated it with an attacking troll just before the Castle War.

    Possible page image (I struggled to cut it down to a reasonable size, plus moving side-by-side boxes to one-above-the-other wasn't easy):

    http://imgur.com/l5enj0X

    And I agree with Larkmarn, Rambo 3 would only be an example if it was the helicopter flying forward onto the tank cannon, not the other way around.
  • May 22, 2013
    Chabal2
    I just realized I made a mistake: the Warcraft example is for Warcraft III, not II.
  • May 22, 2013
    randomsurfer
    • In Blood Brothers of Gor a Fantasy Counterpart Culture Plains Indians war between two tribes uses this. The "good" tribe sets up a series of battlements, each taller than the last but none of them too terribly impregnable. The "bad" tribe jumps over them on their horses, only to fall into a pit of sharpened sticks where they're impaled.

    • Parodied & Downplayed example: On The Simpsons when Bart & Lisa get into a fight. Bart is leaving Lisa's room.
      Bart: OK, but on my way, I'm going to be doing this: [windmills arms] If you get hit, it's your own fault.
      Lisa: OK, then I'm going to start kicking air like this. [kicks] And if any part of you should fill that air, it's your own fault.
      they walk towards each other, then start fighting
      Marge in the kitchen: Oh, I better go check that out. Now Homer, don't you eat this pie!
      Homer: OK...Marge leaves All right, pie, I'm just going to do this. chomps air And if you get eaten, it's your own fault! walks towards pie, chomping air, and hits head on range hood Ow! Oh, my -- aw, to hell with this. grabs pie, eats it
  • May 23, 2013
    Dawnwing
    Added the examples (except Rambo which does not fit since he's actively going after the helicopter). Here's Melkior's image, so we can see them all on the same page:


  • May 23, 2013
    StarSword
    Have a hat.
  • May 23, 2013
    xanderiskander
    Video Games
    • Punch Out: Has Bald Bull who will sometimes retreat to the wall of the ring and charge at the player. You have to uppercut him defensively at just the right moment to defeat this tactic, and knock him out.
  • May 23, 2013
    MrL1193
    ^I don't think that one would really count; you have to actively punch Bald Bull at just the right time to knock him down, making it more of a counterattack than a purely defensive action.
  • May 24, 2013
    Larkmarn
    Yanking the 300 example for not fitting.
  • May 24, 2013
    Melkior
    You should add to the description "This trope does not apply to every impalement. It only applies if the enemy is impaled by his own momentum without the defender needing to move." If you use the ElfQuest image, you could add "See the page image for a classic example."
  • May 25, 2013
    DracMonster
    Ignore this. Mistake.
  • May 25, 2013
    Stratadrake
    Though it's not a great name, I just want to suggest something like Charge Kabob (or Dash Kabob).
  • May 25, 2013
    HamburgerTime
    Is this the same thing as Deadly Dodging?
  • May 25, 2013
    Generality
    • This is how Sam is able to seriously wound Shelob in The Lord Of The Rings. The book explicitly states that he hadn't the strength to pierce her hide, but her forcibly falling on him did.
  • May 25, 2013
    randomsurfer
    • In another Gor book Tarl kills a Larl (basically a lion or tiger the size of a small elephant) by getting it to charge at him while he's holding a spear with the butt firmly stuck in the ground.
  • May 26, 2013
    Melkior
    ^^^ I'd say that this is a subtrope of Deadly Dodging, being a specific type. Deadly Dodging involves causing the enemy to run into anything, a wall; a table; an anvil (Bugs Bunny) or a spear. This trope is for where that dodging causes the enemy to impale themselves. Suggested description text:

    Subtrope of Deadly Dodging, for the case where the dodging causes an enemy to impale himself on something.

    I like Inertial Impalement as a trope name, so long as this trope is intended to be limited to impalement of an enemy by that enemy's own action (inertia).

    Hatted.
  • June 25, 2013
    Chabal2
    Another WCIII example: Thorns Aura, which causes enemy melee attackers to take damage proportional to their attack on units surrounding the unit with the aura (however, it doesn't increase armor).
  • June 25, 2013
    GKaiser
    I like Inertia Impalement. Have another hat.
  • June 27, 2013
    oneuglybunny
    Live Action TV
    • One episode of The Twilight Zone is "The Once And Future King," wherein Gary Pitkin, an Elvis impersonator, gets transported to 1953, where he meets the real Elvis Presley. At first, Elvis thinks Gary is his stillborn brother Jesse, Back From The Dead. However, when Gary begins coaching Elvis about his music, Elvis is reviled. The two men begin to fight, breaking a guitar at the neck. Then Elvis lunges at Gary; Gary rolls aside, and Elvis impales himself fatally on the jagged guitar neck.
  • June 28, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    Seconding Inertia Impalement.
  • July 19, 2013
    Dawnwing
    Sorry that I haven't updated lately; I've done so now. Added all except the Punch Out one, since as pointed out the player intentionally attacks Bald Bull, and Chabal2's WCIII example because from the brief description given I'm not sure how that relates to this trope.

    The only thing I'm a bit hesitant about is the description, since the initial examples were more about the hero not being a killer, whereas later ones have expanded to hunting techniques or other situations where the hero is actively trying to kill them and just uses the villain's inertia to do it. Any tips?

    I think I'll go with Inertial Impalement for the name as that's most popular and describes it well. Apart from the description uncertainties, we still need to choose an image. So, you can see the three images above - which do you think is most appropriate for the page?
  • July 20, 2013
    Koveras
    • Inverted in the end of the first Erast Fandorin novel: it's Fandorin who charges The Dragon (who's about to shoot him), but as they fall out of the window, Fandorin lands safely by his sheer luck, while his nemesis gets impaled on a sharp tree branch.
  • July 20, 2013
    Melkior
    Naturally, I'm going for my image. I suggested it because I think it illustrates the trope more clearly than the other two suggestions. It may be a tad messy but I can probably clean it up a bit.

    I think that the trope should apply to any case where someone uses an enemy's momentum to impale them. I think that limiting the trope to only non-action heroes will make it too narrow.
  • July 20, 2013
    DAN004
    Does it have to be the villain who's getting impaled? I kinda don't think that the hero getting on the pointy end is an inversion.
  • July 20, 2013
    Melkior
    ^ I agree, it should be anyone getting impaled by their own inertia, not just a villain. The trope is about the action, not the person (or so I believe).
  • July 20, 2013
    StarSword
    ^If it isn't, it oughta be (though, granted, it's usually hero-on-villain). And I think the Elf Quest pic works best.
  • July 20, 2013
    paycheckgurl
    In the classic Spider Man story The Night That Gwen Stacy Died The Green Goblin charged at Spider-Man. Spider-Man leaped out of the way causing The Goblin to be impaled by his own glider.
  • July 20, 2013
    Larkmarn
    For a title, how about Impaled Himself?

    Seems a lot less awkward and gets the point across.
  • July 20, 2013
    Melkior
    ^ No, that sounds like deliberate self-harm. This trope is about when it's unintentional but unavoidable due to momentum. The current title gets that across without being too wordy.

  • July 20, 2013
    Melkior
    I'm having trouble getting the edited image to show up here. Edit: Done, thanks.

    Edited page image:


  • July 20, 2013
    m8e
    ^Edited Melkior's post. (Melkior edit that post to get your name back on it.)
  • July 20, 2013
    Larkmarn
    ^^^ Except that you can't just deliberately impale yourself. I think part of Impaled Himself's advantage is it puts the blame on the villain for getting himself impaled, which is how this trope is used the majority of the time to keep the hero blameless.

    EDIT: I'm using hero and villain in place for impaler and impaled, not trying to indicate any significance to villain-ness.
  • July 21, 2013
    Arivne
    If the onrushing person dies and their opponent did not arrange for the pointy object to be there, it's also a Karmic Death.

    If the onrushing person impales themselves on something that belongs to them or they set up, it's also Hoist By His Own Petard.

    Edit: I messed up while writing the above. I wasn't trying to say that these weren't Inertial Impalement, but that they were also the other tropes in addition to being Inertial Impalement. My apologies.
  • July 21, 2013
    Melkior
    When I said unintentional, I meant on the part of the charging person. It seems to me that this trope depends on one person unintentionally impaling himself on something and on the other person having deliberately arranged for this to happen, otherwise it's either Hoist By His Own Petard or Karmic Death. If the charging person deliberately arranged it, then it's straight suicide.
  • July 21, 2013
    DAN004
  • July 21, 2013
    Melkior
    ^ My opinion is that's too long. Inertial Impalement seems okay to me. But I'm flexible. What do others think? In particular, what does the sponsor think?
  • July 21, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    ^ In my opinion, Inertial Impalement is nicely clear and simple (and concise, which Impaled By Rushing Recklessly is not). Also (@Larkmarn ^x9), I don't agree about Impaled Himself being less awkward that the current title. I think it's more awkward.
  • July 21, 2013
    DAN004
    Problem is, the description seems to specify only villains getting impaled while the hero just defends himself. So which one is more tropable: that, or getting impaled by onrushing in general?
  • July 21, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    ^ I don't see what difference does that make what it comes to the name. None of the names proposed so far have said anything about the identity of the one being impaled.

    What it comes to the trope definiton, I think it should be reworded so it doesn't rule out the possibility that the one being impaled is someone other than a villain. Granted, this trope is most often used to invoke Self Disposing Villain, but it can take other forms and being essentially the same thing, I don't see why we should exclude them.
  • July 21, 2013
    StarSword
    ^This. The trope is one combatant holding out something pointy to get their opponent to run into it. Whether one's the hero and the other the villain is a different trope.
  • July 21, 2013
    Arivne
    Adding a vote for Inertial Impalement.

    I also agree that this shouldn't be limited to a villain being impaled. Although it's rare to see it happen to a hero or a neutral, it's possible.
  • July 23, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    What do you know, I just recalled another example:

    Anime and Manga
    • Berserk: Casca scored her first kill this way. This happened when the nobleman, who had supposedly taken her under his wing, tried to rape her. Griffith offered his sword to Casca so she had something to defend herself with, but since at the time Casca was just an ordinary peasant girl, she couldn't have killed the nobleman without this trope. Casca even lapshades this herself:
      Casca: I don't know whether I stabbed him or if he fell onto the blade. It was my first kill. I was so scared I couldn't cry and couldn't move. I just gripped the bloody sword tightly.

    EDIT: Added bold to that The Simpsons example, while I was at it.
  • July 24, 2013
    randomsurfer
    Seven Days: When Olga is fighting her Evil Twin she pushes her and the twin accidentally gets impaled on a piece or rebar sticking out from a wall.
  • July 24, 2013
    Mamona
    In TenThousandBC, this is how D'Leh kills the mammoth. When his spear gets stuck in the ground, he runs away, leading the beast to impale itself. But in this case D'Leh feels bad because he didn't really kill the mammoth himself, as the one who could kill it would get the White Spear, and more importantly, would be allowed to marry Evolet.

    Edit: He also does it to the terrorbirds, this time intentional.
  • July 24, 2013
    jastay3
    Don't they have a few scenes sort of like this in Zulu? I forget. Of course most of the time the Zulus who get through rifle fire are trying to climb a pile of sandbags and the British bayoneting them while off balance.
  • July 25, 2013
    Arivne
    ^ ^^^ To be this trope, the opponent has to be deliberately moving toward the person with the weapon and impale themselves on it. From their description neither the Seven Days nor the Zulu examples fit.

    Tabletop Games
    • Earthdawn Combat chapter. One of the techniques in the Mounted Combat section is "Setting Against A Charge". If a character knows a Charging Attack is coming and has a spear or lance available, he can make a Melee Weapons Test. If he succeeds, he hits the charging opponent and does damage before the opponent can attack. If he succeeds really well he can knock the opponent off his steed.
  • August 15, 2013
    Arivne
    Tabletop Games
    • Chaosium's Elf Quest RPG. Characters with long thrusting weapons (such as spears) can set them to receive the impact from a charge.
  • August 15, 2013
    TalonisWolf
    Would those scenes where this happens and the impaled pulls the weapon further to attempt to get closer count as a sub-trope?
  • August 15, 2013
    DAN004
    It would count as a Subverted Trope I think
  • August 15, 2013
    Chabal2
    Samurai Jack: several enemies are defeated this way, notably in Jack and the Spartans (see phalanx formation in Real Life) and one where a charging elephant robot keeps going after running over Jack holding his sword in the air and its guts spill out from its belly.
  • August 15, 2013
    Melkior
    I fixed the double "and" in the Real Life - Boar Spear example.

    I think this has gone into Just Launch It Already territory.
  • August 16, 2013
    DAN004
    Um, there still need a consensus of "do we need to mention the hero/villain dynamic here or not".

    Though I choose not. :P
  • August 20, 2013
    Dawnwing
    It's better to be just about the action and not just hero/villain, but I'm trying to come up with a new description for it to reflect that.
  • August 31, 2013
    Arivne
    Live Action TV
    • Friday The13th The Series episode "Night Prey". A vampire hunter attacks a vampire but the vampire knocks him down. The vampire then leaps onto the man but is impaled on a crucifix the man is holding up, killing it. Watch it here.
  • January 8, 2014
    Paradisesnake
    Namespaced a couple examples. Also took the liberty of adding my Berserk example in the draft since it hadn't been added yet.

    I'm pretty surprised this hasn't been launched yet. I thought it was done ages ago.
  • January 8, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    see also Bullfight Boss.
  • January 8, 2014
    DAN004
  • January 8, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    btw, the name is poor. can't we have a crowner before launch?

    suggesting Bullfight Impalement Trap.
  • January 9, 2014
    Paradisesnake
    Fixed a couple typos in my example.
  • January 18, 2014
    Dawnwing
    I'm still stuck on the description and could really use some help with it. As I said, it's not just about the hero being innocent, we've found plenty of examples that doesn't fit that. I can't think of what to say about it, though.

    Also, we've got three images that hardly anyone's given an opinion on.




  • January 18, 2014
    Tuckerscreator
    • In the final battle of Pacific Rim, Raiju, a Lightning Bruiser Kaiju who has already ripped off one of Gipsy Danger's arms, charges at the crippled Jaeger with incredible speed. Gipsy, however, deploys the sword in its other arm and pierces it out just before Raiju hits it. The results are gory... and glorious.

    And I like the first image. Least confusing, in my opinion.
  • February 1, 2014
    Arivne
    Literature
    • Andre Norton's Judgment on Janus. After Niall/Ayyar falls into a kalcrok's trap, the kalcrok jumps at him to try to pin him to the wall. It is impaled on his sword, (which he happened to be holding in front of him), killing it.
  • February 1, 2014
    DAN004
    Can the first image show who the guy's impaling?
  • February 1, 2014
    SKJAM
    Not sure if this one fits here, but in the novel Murder By Sunlight in one of the subplots a dead man is found impaled on a tree branch a good fourteen feet or so off the ground with no indication of how he got there. It turns out he was roofsurfing on a monster truck.
  • May 1, 2014
    StarSword
    Bumpity bumpity bump.
  • May 1, 2014
    DAN004
    Would impalement into Spikes Of Doom (as opposed to an enemy) count here?
  • May 1, 2014
    LordGro
    A vote against Inertial Impalement. These forceful alliterations have become really grating. Impaled Himself is better. I also could see Run Into The Blade / Ran Into The Blade or Ran Into The Weapon.
  • May 2, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ Inerrial Impalement isn't just alliterative, it's clear.
  • May 2, 2014
    LordGro
    No, actually, it is not clear at all, because it is ambiguous on what exactly is it that's inert. "Inertia" can also mean inactivity, laziness when applied to people (check a dictionary). But the person who gets impaled here is the exact opposite of inactive.
  • May 2, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ All titles can be confusing if you look into them too much. Sad truth...

    Kinda wanna call Passive Impalement but I wonder if some chap mistook it for something else as well.

    Running Into Impalement? (Doesn't have to be someone's blade or spear as the pic suggests)
  • May 2, 2014
    partner555
    In Hot Fuzz, around the climax, one of the baddies was about to attack the goodies, but he slips and impales himself on a model building. He doesn't die though and is arrested for his crimes.
  • May 2, 2014
    Paradisesnake
    ^^^ You're overthinking it. Inertial Impalement is fine. It runs with the same logic as Inertia Is A Cruel Mistress, and I'd dare say your average troper thinks along the same lines.
  • May 2, 2014
    LordGro
    Well, I cast my vote and I'm not changing it. Inertial Impalement gives you no hint that either people or weapons are involved. Just a cryptic alliteration.
  • May 3, 2014
    DAN004
    So, would we like a crowner?
  • May 21, 2014
    Arivne
    Live Action TV
    • Star Trek The Original Series first pilot episode "The Menagerie". During the illusionary battle between Captain Pike and a Rigelian warrior, Pike is kneeling in a courtyard holding up a broken spearhead braced against the ground. The warrior jumps down on him and impales himself on the spearhead. Watch it here.
  • May 21, 2014
    DAN004
    May I take this over?
  • May 22, 2014
    Arivne
    ^ Since the OP Dawnwing last posted here in January, more than two months ago, yes.
  • May 22, 2014
    Hvezdomuz
    I don't really see this as a Sub Trope of Impaled With Extreme Prejudice.
  • May 22, 2014
    Paradisesnake
    ^ Impaled With Extreme Prejudice = a character gets impaled on a long, sharp thing.

    Inertial Impalement = a character charges towards another character and impales him/herself on a long, sharp thing.

    Looks like a subtrope to me...
  • May 22, 2014
    DAN004
    ^^^ yaay.
  • May 29, 2014
    Dawnwing
    You're free to take this over if you like, or else I can jump on it again. I feel bad that I've kept this hanging around so long - that darned description had me stuck, and then a new job and moving came up and I totally forgot about it. I'm all settled in now and tonight's the first time I even thought about it in about two or three months.

    I think I've got the basics of a suitable description in my head now though (something along the lines of it being for super dramatic effect 'cause it usually involves the villain getting really close to the hero), if you'd like me to rewrite it I should have it within a couple days. I do want to see it launched, and as soon as possible. This has been in YKTTW for too long, and a big part of it is my fault.

    In response to the question about whether the first image could show who's getting impaled, this is the best I can do without the bottom character being obscured:


  • May 29, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ Go ahead, then.
  • May 31, 2014
    DAN004
    Added examples not yet there.
  • May 31, 2014
    eroock
    Film:
    • In Snowpiercer, the tall bearded guy is pierced by a metal rod that Yona puts in his way.
  • June 2, 2014
    Arivne
  • June 2, 2014
    Dawnwing
    I see someone had indeed edited the description. That helped immensely; thanks! Also thanks to DAN004 for adding the examples and Arivne for the editing. And anyone else who's helped with this. You guys rock. :D

    So, let's get this thing moving: Is there anything you guys think we need a crowner on, since I saw that coming up - image, name? If not, I'll launch it and pull relevant examples from Impaled With Extreme Prejudice tomorrow after work. That's about 16 hours from now; should be enough time for anyone to give any last input.
  • June 3, 2014
    DAN004
    Current pic is okay already.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable