Created By: Lightflame on August 20, 2011 Last Edited By: Lightflame on March 18, 2012

Two Part Dungeon

A dungeon that requires you to leave and come back in order to complete it.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Rolling Updates, Launching Hats Please

A Two Part Dungeon is a dungeon that requires the player to leave and accomplish some task outside the dungeon, then return and finish the dungeon. There could be various reasons for this.

  • The heroes find the path ahead is blocked and they need a Plot Coupon that isn't in the dungeon to unblock it.
  • The villain appears and blows the heroes out of the dungeon and they need to return.
  • The heroes find what they want for the moment, only to leave and realize or be told that they need something else there.
  • In some cases the dungeon may have multiple sections accessed via different entrances, like the Spirit Temple from Ocarina Of Time, and both are required to fully complete the dungeon.

There are several reasons for doing this:

  • Making fewer dungeons, but in multiple parts is easier and probably cheaper than making more one-part dungeons: the dev team doesn't have to figure out additional looks, layouts, and monster bases, and come up with more map locations. In higher budget productions, each area might have its own theme, so less dungeons obviously lowers music costs.
  • Locking off the later sections of the dungeon first-on is convenient -- the story can employ the dungeon at different parts of the story without the need to unexplicably switch the previously level 0 Sewer Rats with level 87 Dire Hellrats.
  • Requiring PlotCoupons for accessing the further parts of the dungeons is good fuel for optional quests and adds depth to the game; getting to the bottom of that cave isn't just about level grinding enough to survive the tougher monsters.
  • Bottoms of multipart dungeons make for good Optional Boss lairs; getting there provides some challenge and the player won't bump into them by accident.

Often this trope will appear in climactic dungeons to show that the dungeon is so vast that you need to visit twice to see the whole thing.


Examples Of This Trope Can Be Found In:

  • In Ōkamiden, this is done twice.
    • First, in the Ancient Ruins, Chibi and Kurow's path is blocked by a huge thunderbolt. When they fly out to remove it, a gust of wind blows to to Agata Forest and they have to find a way to get back.
    • Second, in the One Hundred Years Ago Moon Cave, when Akuro succeeds in bathing in Orochi's blood, Chibi runs away before returning for the rest of the dungeon.
  • In The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, the happens with The Forsaken Fortress. Link confronts Ganondorf, who throws him out to sea. He then has to go questing for a while before he can return.
    • Also, the Spirit Temple in Ocarina of Time, where Link must play separate segments for adult and child Link to progress.
    • And a central mechanic in Spirit Tracks and Phantom Hourglass, which require revisiting the same dungeon multiple times to unlock different parts of the world.
    • As well as the Stone Tower Temple in Majora'sMask, where Link must leave so that he can flip the dungeon upside down.
  • In Dragon Quest IX, at the Magmaroo, the dragon you meet there won't talk to you unless you leave the dungeon to get him some ale.
  • During the events of the original Kingdom Hearts, Sora and friends are forced to flee Hollow Bastion, and must retrieve a Plot Coupon from Traverse Town before returning.
  • During Super Paper Mario, you must exit and return to the Flopside Pit of 100 Trials to fight the Bonus Boss and get all rewards.
  • Final Fantasy XII is pretty fond of these. The plot takes you through the Barheim Passage, the Lhusu Mines and the Henne Mines; all three are revisitable later on. All have initially closed off sections (and Barheim Passage is closed altogether), which are opened via optional quests, usually involving Hunts and leading finally to optional bosses.
    • Lhusu Mines takes three visits to unlock completely: first the plot-required section, later a Hunt that grants access to the second part, and finally the third part is accessible as soon as the player finds a key released by finishing that second part-opening Hunt.
  • Both Bango and Kazooie games have this in spades. Nearly every level has to be returned to in order to complete it, though this is especially evident in Banjo Tooie.
  • The Radio Tower in Pokémon Gold and Silver, which requires you to leave and save the director, before you can progress.
  • The Hell Temple in La-Mulana, which requires you to leave and obtain an item after a certain point before you can come back.
  • Persona does this in the "Palace of the Harem Queen." The player must advance through the dungeon, insult her art, and return after being blown to the surface.
  • Wario Land 3 is made of this. Every level has to be revisited several times and you visit often completely different routes each time, as you've either got a new skill or changed something on the level that opens a new path.
  • Technically just about every level in every Metroid title, or any game with a lot of free roaming and locked doors.
  • In the original Final Fantasy, you have to leave the Earth Cave after acquiring the Ruby from the mini-boss Vampire, so that the Stone Golem will grant you access to Sarda's Cave, where Sarda will give you the Earth Rod your party needs in order to get to Lich, the Earth Fiend.
  • In Suikoden II, you need to rescue Greenhill's mayor Teresa Wisemail the first time you get there, and then re-take the city when you come back.
    • Also, the first trip to Rockaxe is a desperate diplomatic mission that failed, but you get to take the castle on the second trip.
  • In Monty Python's The Meaning of Life (the videogame) you have to complete the material level in order to complete the spiritual level and you have to complete the spiritual level in order to complete the material level.

Community Feedback Replies: 19
  • August 20, 2011
    DarkConfidant
    Super Paper Mario, with the Flopside Pit of 100 Trials. You have to go through it twice in order to fully complete it and fight the Bonus Boss within.
  • August 20, 2011
    MiinU

    Video games

    • Continuing the Zelda examples. The Stone Tower Temple in Majora's Mask must be completed in two phases: the temple proper and the inverted temple; which requires the player to exit the dungeon and turn it (and the surrounding area!) upside down, using a light arrow.
  • August 20, 2011
    Stratadrake
    In some cases the dungeon may have multiple sections accessed via different entrances, like the Spirit Temple from Ocarina Of Time, and both are required to fully complete the dungeon.
  • August 20, 2011
    CharacterInWhite
    Both Bango and Kazooie games have this in spades. Nearly every level has to be returned to in order to complete it, though this is especially evident in Banjo Tooie.

    Come to think of it, N64 platformers in general. :P
  • August 20, 2011
    Monessi
    I dunno if this counts, but the Suikoden series of games is big on making you revisit old dungeons late in the game to pick up new NP Cs. Straighter examples exist as well, usually dependent on opening a previously locked bit of the dungeon (Suikoden 5's Big Hole, for instance).
  • August 21, 2011
    peccantis
    • Final Fanatasy XII is pretty fond of these. The plot takes you through the Barheim Passage, the Lhusu Mines and the Henne Mines; all three are revisitable later on. All have initially closed off sections (and Barheim Passage is closed altogether), which are opened via optional quests, usually involving Hunts and leading finally to optional bosses.
      • Lhusu Mines takes three visits to unlock completely: first the plot-required section, later a Hunt that grants access to the second part, and finally the third part is accessible as soon as the player finds a key released by finishing that second part-opening Hunt.
  • August 23, 2011
    CommanderPanda
    • Persona does this in the "Palace of the Harem Queen." The player must advance through the dungeon, insult her art, and return after being blown to the surface.
  • August 23, 2011
    randomsurfer
    Does it have to be a dungeon? Or can another location count?
  • August 23, 2011
    CommanderPanda
    ^ any "level." As gamers, we were taught to use the words interchangeably.
  • August 23, 2011
    acrobox
    Technically just about every level in every Metroid title, or any game with a lot of free roaming and locked doors.
  • August 24, 2011
    TheChainMan
    Wario Land 3 is made of this. Every level has to be revisited several times and you visit often completely different routes each time, as you've either got a new skill or changed something on the level that opens a new path.
  • August 24, 2011
    judasmartel
    In the original Final Fantasy, you have to leave the Earth Cave after acquiring the Ruby from the mini-boss Vampire, so that the Stone Golem will grant you access to Sarda's Cave, where Sarda will give you the Earth Rod your party needs in order to get to Lich, the Earth Fiend.
  • August 24, 2011
    judasmartel
    In Suikoden II, you need to rescue Greenhill's mayor Teresa Wisemail the first time you get there, and then re-take the city when you come back.
    • Also, the first trip to Rockaxe is a desperate diplomatic mission that failed, but you get to take the castle on the second trip.
    • Earlier in the game, you have to accompany Freed Yamamoto to North Window to investigate the disappearances of young women in there. Here you will meet Neclord, whose BodyDouble was the one actually killed back in Suikoden I a Nigh Invulnerable blood-sucking bastard, unless you get the Star Dragon Sword stored at a nearby Cave of the Wind. After getting Viktor's new BFS, you can now enter North Window to fight Neclord, but he left the party with a Giant Mook as he escapes.
  • August 24, 2011
    randomsurfer
    In Monty Pythons The Meaning Of Life (the videogame) you have to complete the material level in order to complete the spiritual level and you have to complete the spiritual level in order to complete the material level.
  • August 24, 2011
    peccantis
    This needs some lines on the production values that result in multipart dungeons. Such as:

    • Making fewer multipart dungeons is easier and probably cheaper than making more one-part dungeons: the dev team doesn't have to figure out additional looks, layouts, and monster bases, and come up with more map locations. In higher budget productions, each area might have its own theme, so less dungeons obviously lowers music costs.
    • Locking off the later sections of the dungeon first-on is convenient -- the story can employ the dungeon at different parts of the story without the need to unexplicably switch the previously level 0 Sewer Rats with level 87 Dire Hellrats.
    • Requiring PlotCoupons for accessing the further parts of the dungeons is good fuel for optional quests and adds depth to the game; getting to the bottom of that cave isn't just about level grinding enough to survive the tougher monsters.
    • Bottoms of multipart dungeons make for good Optional Boss lairs; getting there provides some challenge and the player won't bump into them by accident.
  • August 24, 2011
    stupac85
    It is impossible to complete the first two levels of Donkey Kong 64 on your first visit because it requires the use of all five playable Kongs and you don't unlock the fifth one until you reach the third level. There are even some buildings and similar places within the levels that must be entered multiple times with different Kongs in order to complete everything due to there not being a Tag Barrel to switch Kongs inside the building.
  • March 18, 2012
    TwoGunAngel
    Quite a few old-school dungeons in Dungeons And Dragons are such that a party looking to clear the place out may well need to go in there multiple times, usually because one has to leave in order to regroup, resupply and generally survive.
  • March 18, 2012
    Aries
    Well... this could be a subtrope of Metroidvania. The big difference is that a Metroidvania spans the entire game, and this only spans a dungeon or two.

    Another Zelda example:
    • In Skyward Sword the Skyview Temple is this. Once you return, you discover that it is filled with new enemies, new characters, and you are also given access to areas you couldn't reach before.
  • March 18, 2012
    Stratadrake
    ^ Come to think of it, Skyview Temple (the forest temple, right?) was the only bonafide dungeon you had to traverse twice. However, it's not technically an example, since you could indeed complete it (e.g. explore all rooms, collect all treasures) your first time through. Ocarina's Spirit Temple, by compare/contrast, was clearly a two-parter.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=xvgjqis2ba6zx0pbmoaoskia