Created By: DaibhidC on January 7, 2015 Last Edited By: WolfMattGrey on September 6, 2017
Troped

Alliance Of Alternates

Teaming up with multiple alternate universe versions of yourself.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/batmanforallseasons_5703.png
The Bat-family that fights crime together, stays together.

If a setting has Alternate Universes, then there is probably more than one version of the main character. If there are an infinite number of universes (or even just 52) then there will be lots of versions of the main character. So what's better than him meeting one of them?

Meeting all of them at once! This gives lots of opportunities for Other Me Annoys Me bickering, while at the same time most versions of the character can find some version they can get along with. If Evil Me Scares Me, they could be there too, but at least they'll probably be outnumbered. The most important thing, though, is that they'll all be able to fight a common foe that previously overpowered them, or accomplish a significant goal.

Time-travel examples, such as a character meeting his past or future self/selves, don't count unless the mechanics of the work mean time-traveling creates a different universe. For a meeting of selves from the same universe, see Me's a Crowd. When other selves simply meet or exist without necessarily teaming up against someone or something, see Alternate Self.

Sister Trope of Intra-Franchise Crossover, which is when different incarnations of the story itself crossover. Contrast Never the Selves Shall Meet.


Examples

    open/close all folders 

     Anime 
  • In the last episode of Digimon Adventure 02 the characters get blasted into another dimension that makes wishes into reality. When they ask for more power they split off into all of their alternate forms. For example Davis is able to summon Veemon, Flamedramon, Raidramon, Exveemon, Paildramon, and Imperialdramon in both dragon and fighter modes all at once where in a regular battle Veemon would only be able to transform into one of the above. Multiply this by the 6 main characters and they form a small army.

     Comic Books 
  • In Marvel Comics:
    • Kang the Conqueror has the Council of Cross-Time Kangs, formed to rule multiple realities. They clashed several times with the Avengers during their plans.
    • Fantastic Four homaged the Council of Kangs with the Interdimensional Council of Reeds, led by three versions of Reed Richards with Infinity Gauntlets. Earth-616's Reed quickly discovers that their For Science! attitude clashes with his own morality and sense of family.
    • Also the Captain Britain Corps, although not all of them are alternates of Brian Braddock (but many of them are). They're basically mystically powered protectors of the multiverse under the direction of Roma and Opal Luna Saturnyne.
    • The plot of Spider-Verse is all the Spider-Men of different realities teaming up to stop Morlun and his family from killing all the Spider-Totems.
    • In one arc of Exiles an Exiles team of Wolverines from assorted realities band together to stop an evil Wolverine from yet another reality.
    • Deadpool has teamed up with several alternate universe versions of himself to format the Deadpool Corps. which include: Lady Deadpool, Kidpool, Dogpool, and Headpool. They join forces to stop the villainous Dreadpool.
    • Played for laughs in Deadpool: Too Soon where multiple Wolverines are having a baseball match against multiple Spider-Men (yes, the ones from the Spider-Verse example above) and Deadpool shows up as a supporter of both teams.

  • In DC Comics:
    • In The Multiversity: Thunderworld, Dr Sivana contacts other universes to form a League of Sivanas. Notable members include a cartoon snake (presumably the enemy of Hoppy the Marvel Bunny), a crazy Sivana in a bite-mask who even gives Thunderworld!Sivana the creeps, and a respectable scientist who's horrified to realise the others are all criminals.
    • The various incarnations of the Legion of Super-Heroes teamed up in Final Crisis: Legion of 3 Worlds against Superboy-Prime, starting with Reboot, Retroboot and Threeboot, but later including the 5 Years Later Legion, the SW6 Legion, the Silver Age Adult Legion and so on.
    • An arc of the 90's Superboy series ("Hyper-Tension!") had various versions of Kon-El (and one of Clark Kent) allying themselves to fight a version of Kon that was grown up, more powerful because of his age, and so Drunk on the Dark Side that he became a Multiversal Conqueror.
    • During Final Crisis, Superman and The Question recruit the Supermen of the Multiverse, who face down Ultraman and eventually Darkseid.

  • At one point, villain Angstrom Levy in Invincible gathers Evil Twin type alternates of the hero Invincible from Mirror Universes to kill him and take over the world.

     Film - Live Action 

     Live Action Television 
  • Stargate SG-1: In "Ripple Effect", a whole bunch of alternate SG-1s arrive in the SGC because of black hole-related technobabble, and the various Carters all have to work together to fix the problem.

     Video Games 
  • Brainiac's plan in Scribblenauts Unmasked is to steal Lily's teleporting globe and use it to summon alternate universe versions of himself to defeat the Justice League. The key to defeating him potentially uses the same trope- You have to summon alternate versions of superheroes, so you can, if you wish, have a dozen different Supermans fighting the Brainiacs.

     Web Animation 
  • Homestar Runner: In Strong Bad Email #150 ("alternate universe"), Strong Bad decides to form a supergroup with his dimensional doppelgangers and record a number one jam.
  • The Floating Hands parody animation "Fantastic Four: Doomsday" features Doctor Doom teaming up with versions of himself from alternate continuities.
    Doom: "If you want something done right, you do it yourself. With yourself."

     Webcomics 
  • Homestuck is full of these. The time-travel mechanics of a Sburb session almost always end up creating offshoot timelines overlapping with the main one. Scratching a session creates a new universe where the players and guardian roles are swapped. It is thus easy to meet and work with counterparts.
    • Aradia gathered thousands of alternate selves to help fight the Black King in the troll session.
    • Jane finally meets her pre-Scratch counterpart Nannasprite before the final battle. Except that there's two of them due to the retcon. They end up fighting together.
    • Thousands of ghost versions of the troll players from doomed timelines are brought together to fight Lord English near the end of the comic.
  • In Spinnerette, Spinny teams up with Silver Age and '90s Anti-Hero versions of herself, which arrived through spacetime rifts, in order to stop an immensely powerful supervillain called the Editor from "rebooting" the world. Then they also met the retired Golden Age version... who revealed that the Editor's "reboot" was not The End of the World as We Know It, but rather the creation of yet another Alternate Universe, this one IN SPACE!.
  • In TV Tropes The Webcomic, Report Siht occasionally teams up with alternate versions of himself from parallel universes, Report Taht and Report Nwonknu.

     Western Animation 

Community Feedback Replies: 63
  • January 7, 2015
    ropertroper
    Video Games:
    • One of the Mario and Luigi games involves them teaming up with younger versions of themselves.

    Western Animation:
    • The Dexters Laboratory movie "Ego Trip" had Dexter time-traveling and teaming up with three future versions of himself.
  • January 7, 2015
    dokatron
    The 90's Spiderman cartoon also had this storyline, although all I remember is a Doc-Ock style Spiderman, and a partway changed to Man-Spider one.
  • January 7, 2015
    robbulldog
    Film
    • The6th Day featured Arnold Schwarzenegger's character teaming up with a clone of himself.

    Live Action TV
  • January 7, 2015
    DAN004
    I believe the Clone Saga is a great example. (Can't elaborate tho)
  • January 7, 2015
    Illemar
    This forms the basis of Inter World, where all Walkers (interdimensionary travellers) are versions of Joey Harker, the protagonist.

    Also it's alliance with two l's.
  • January 7, 2015
    randomsurfer
    • In an issue of What If "What If Peter Parker's Clone had Lived?" (written after the original 1970s clone saga and well before the 1990s one) Peter Parker and his clone decide to take turns being Spider Man and Peter Parker. It is notably the only issue of What If? which has a happy ending.
    • In the comic Identity Wars Spider Man gets sucked into an alternate dimension where he teams up with that universe's Spider Man (and Uncle Ben is alive!). They get along well for a while, until 616!Spider-Man discovers that the other Spider-Man has been luring Spider-Men from other universes into his and stealing their powers & killing them for years. And Uncle Ben is the mastermind of the project.
  • January 7, 2015
    Koveras
  • January 7, 2015
    Earnest
    Here's a potential page pic from Batman The Brave And The Bold. Batman uses a dimensional portal to recruit a team of alternate Batmen to fight the villains.
  • January 7, 2015
    aurora369
    Does this have to involve parallel world counterparts rather than, for example, magical clones?
  • January 7, 2015
    marcoasalazarm
    Another comic book example: An arc of the 90's Superboy series ("Hyper-Tension!") had various versions of Kon-El (and one of Clark Kent) allying themselves to fight a version of Kon that was grown up, more powerful because of his age, and so Drunk On The Dark Side that he became a Multiversal Conqueror.
  • January 7, 2015
    troacctid
    • This is the plot of Sonic Generations. Dr. Robotnik from the past teams up with Dr. Eggman from the present, and Sonic and his past self team up to stop them.
    • Homestar Runner: In Strong Bad Email #150 ("alternate universe"), Strong Bad decides to form a supergroup with his dimensional doppelgangers and record a number one jam.
  • January 7, 2015
    Chabal2
    • There's a Calvin And Hobbes fanfic where Calvin's alter egoes like Spaceman Spiff, Stupendous Man and Tracer Bullet team up.
    • Calvin And Hobbes has a downplayed version where he tries to use time travel to avoid working on a project, by picking it up in the future once he's finished it. 6:30 Calvin goes forward to 8:30 Calvin, who says he didn't do it because he expected to get it from his future self two hours ago. As the Hobbeses shake their heads, the two Calvins decide that it must be that lazy 7:30 Calvin's fault, go to him and gang up on him. 7:30 Calvin defuses the situation by pointing out that his future self will be the one to get hurt.
    • Played For Laughs in Discworld, where a groggy Vimes gets up with help from His Grace the Duke of Ankh-Morpork Sir Samuel Vimes, Watch Commander Sam Vimes, and even Blackboard Monitor Vimes (all three are technically official titles of his, though he hates the first and the third only works with dwarves).

  • January 7, 2015
    acrobox
    Xehanort's ultimate goal in Kingdom Hearts is to create an alliance of 12 versions of himself to represent the power of Darkness in the universe. These include his original self, a younger self from the past, various clones of himself that split off during experiments, and other fanatics willing to give up their identity and become clones as well.
  • January 7, 2015
    Earnest
  • January 7, 2015
    ginsengaddict
    Corrected spelling error in title.
  • January 8, 2015
    flatmatt
    I suggest making the "alliance" requirement more explicit in the description. Also, based on the suggestions provided so far, perhaps a note at the end that simply teaming up with one alternate version of yourself does not meet the requirements? Also perhaps a note that simply creating a large number of yourself (Multiple Man) does not fulfill the requirements. Assuming, of course, that I'm right about what the requirements are!

  • January 8, 2015
    Bisected8
    • In the third Time Splitters game, there are several points where you "team up" with future versions of Cortez, before going back in time to help your past self later in the game. Including the tutorial, as you discover in the penultimate level.
  • January 8, 2015
    Arivne
    • Capitalized the title.
    • Examples section
      • Added a line separating the Description and Examples sections.
      • Blue Linked media section titles.
  • January 8, 2015
    Generality
    • Brainiac's plan in Scribblenauts Unmasked is to steal Lily's teleporting globe and use it to summon alternate universe versions of himself to defeat the Justice League. The key to defeating him potentially uses the same trope- You have to summon alternate versions of superheroes, so you can, if you wish, have a dozen different Supermans fighting the Brainiacs.
  • January 8, 2015
    Earnest
    Added a trope pic.
  • January 8, 2015
    Paycheckgurl
  • January 8, 2015
    marcoasalazarm
    First hat!
  • January 8, 2015
    Kayube
    The final battle of Tokumei Sentai Gobusters Returns Vs Dobutsu Sentai Gobusters involves the alternate Go-Busters teaming up with the regular ones.
  • January 8, 2015
    randomsurfer
    Description should mention that it doesn't include past/future selves from the same universe. (Assuming that they don't, which is implied).
  • January 8, 2015
    MorningStar1337
    • Ben 10 Omniverse had a two parter which involves Ben and his AU counterparts (as well as an AU Gwen, who had that universe's Omnitrix) teaming up to Stop Eon and Vilgax form enacting an Evil Plan. There are 2 twists involved: Vilgax and Eon also have their own army of AU!Bens (and Albedo), and that part ends with Vilgax pulling a multiverse-scale Cosmic Retcon that erases everyonw with the Omnitrix, leaving only one Ben behind, becuase he didn't get his verse's Omnitrix. The next episode focus on reversing this

    (If we're not limiting it to a set minimum, "Store 23" counts as well)

    Also Doctor Who has a few examples: The Three Doctors, The Five Doctors, and the Day of The Doctor. Steven Universe subverts it in one case where the titular character uses time displaced clones to start a band...only for them to argue and fight amongst themselves (neither of which counts if what surfer says you implied are true)
  • January 9, 2015
    acrobox
    • Turtles Forever centers around the team up of the 2003 version of the TMNT and the 1987 version. In the finale the turtles from issue 1 of the original comic book series in 1984 also join. In the end you have 12 turtles, 3 versions of each of the four brothers.

    • In the last episode of Digimon Adventure 02 the characters get blasted into another dimension that makes wishes into reality. When they ask for more power they split off into all of their alternate forms. For example Davis is able to summon Veemon, Flamedramon, Raidramon, Exveemon, Paildramon, and Imperialdramon in both dragon and fighter modes all at once where in a regular battle Veemon would only be able to transform into one of the above. Multiply this by the 6 main characters and they form a small army.
  • August 12, 2015
    concolor
    • Rick And Morty has the Council of Ricks, a multiversal government made of alternate Ricks.
  • August 12, 2015
    StarSword
    • Stargate SG 1:
      • In "Point of View", Prime!Carter has to team up with an Alternate Universe Carter to fix the stargate booster that let O'Neill dial the Asgard homeworld back in "The Fifth Race" in order to contact the Asgard for help in Alt!Carter's home reality.
      • In "Ripple Effect", a whole bunch of alternate SG-1s arrive in the SGC because of black hole-related technobabble, and the various Carters all have to work together to fix the problem.
  • August 12, 2015
    Chabal2
    • One The Authority story has the heroes meet a Gender Flipped version of themselves, though there's no real team-up.
    • Averted in Warhammer 40 K with Waaagh! Grigutz. Due to Warp currents, the Waaagh! ended up coming out of FTL just before they left. The two attacked each other, with Grigutz killing his past self so he could have two sets of his favorite gun. The Waaagh(s)! disbanded in the confusion.

  • August 12, 2015
    shimaspawn
    ^ Neither of those are examples of this tropes. They're just examples of other related tropes.
  • August 12, 2015
    bitemytail
    Seems like this is a variant of Mes A Crowd
  • August 12, 2015
    acrobox
    Yeah but Mes A Crowd is one person instantly creating copies of themselves as a superpower. This involves some level of dimension or time hopping, or alternate versions of a person that live independently and wouldn't meet under normal circumstances.
  • August 12, 2015
    bitemytail
    ^ Hence the word variant?
  • August 12, 2015
    shimaspawn
    ^^ It's a sister trope.
  • August 12, 2015
    acrobox
    ok
  • August 12, 2015
    randomsurfer
    In one arc of Exiles an Exiles team of Wolverines from assorted realities band together to stop an evil Wolverine from yet another reality.
  • August 15, 2015
    AgProv
    Michael Moorcock frequently has multiple versions of the Eternal Warrior fall through holes in the Multiverse or something, in order to team up and fight Law/Chaos together (depending on which is effing up the world this time).
  • August 15, 2015
    BKelly95
    Does this count:

    Video Games
    • The second season of Sam And Max Freelance Police has T-H-E-M, a mariachi musician named Pedro and his past and future selves. Needless to say, they have a time machine.
  • August 15, 2015
    dalek955
  • August 16, 2015
    StrixObscuro
    Comic Books
    • During Final Crisis, Superman teamed up with three alternate versions of himself (an evil version, a Nazi version, and a god-like version) in order to track down and fight Mandrakk. There was also another coalition of alternate-reality Supermen brought together by Renee Montoya to bring down the Justifiers.
  • August 16, 2015
    Generality
    • In the final level of Scribblenauts Unmasked, Big Bad Brainiac uses Lily's teleportation globe to summon versions of himself from various DC universes so that they collectively have enough firepower to take on the world's legion of superheroes. He also develops a beam that teleports away any local who tries to attack him, so the only way to defeat him is to summon alternate-universe superheroes.
  • August 16, 2015
    TonyG
    • In Minions, one of the villains the minions meet is a Mad Scientist who uses his Time Machine to get future versions of himself as helpers. Unfortunately, one of them accidentally kills the original, causing all the others to disappear in a Puff Of Logic.
    • On one Treehouse Of Horror segment of The Simpsons, Bart creates an alternate universe where Marge and Homer never married. Homers from various eras then gather together to try and win Marge's heart.
  • August 17, 2015
    StrixObscuro
    Comic Books
    • In The Intimates, one of the instructors at The Seminary is a superhero whose powers enable him to coordinate attacks with parallel-universe versions of himself.
  • August 17, 2015
    dalek955
    I think this is Up For Grabs, unless shimaspawn already grabbed it. DaibhidC posted this in January and never posted a response, so unless he's been editing recently it's past the lose-by date.
  • August 18, 2015
    StrixObscuro
    I might take it over, if no one has any objections.
  • August 19, 2015
    CarterW
    Western animation

    In the Steven Universe episode Stevenandthe Stevens Steven creates a band with three other stevens. they fight and eventually it's an all out brawl between stevens.
  • August 19, 2015
    BKelly95
    Video Games
    • Near the end of Day Of The Tentacle, the group successfully returns to the point in time before Purple Tentacle mutated to prevent that from happening. However, future Purple Tentacle shows up with an army of his past selves created by repeated use of the time machine.

    Live Action Television
    • One Saturday Night Live sketch with "The Falconer" has him being approached by his future self trying to warn him about some tragedy, only for his falcon Donald to be fatally shot seconds later. The two of them then go to the time machine used by the future Falconer to go back in time to prevent this. They fail repeatedly until there's about a dozen Falconers trying to warn the original. (Note: Since SNL has a low special effects budget, each version of the Falconer is played by a different cast member.)
  • August 29, 2017
    GirlofMassDeconstruction
    Bumping.
  • August 30, 2017
    Snowy66
  • August 31, 2017
    Prime32
  • September 1, 2017
    Basara-kun
    See also Intra Franchise Crossover, in which diverse Alternate Universe versions of The Hero can team up against the same Big Bad.

    (there're various examples there it can be used here BTW)
  • September 1, 2017
    Statzkeen
    "Description should mention that it doesn't include past/future selves from the same universe. (Assuming that they don't, which is implied)."

    I think that distinction is unnecessary. Any sort of "teaming with version of yourself" is the same trope whether they are clones, duplicates, or alt universe versions.
  • September 3, 2017
    Bisected8
    • In the Power Rangers Wild Force episode, "Forever Red" (made to commemorate the franchise's 10th anniversary, WF itself being the 10th series), there is an entire 10 ranger team made up of previous series' Red Rangers and the contemporary team's Rookie Red Ranger.
  • September 3, 2017
    WolfMattGrey
    Is this up for grabs? If so, I can work on it.

    Also, someone should add the Batman example that makes the page image, otherwise there's no point in having it as the image. I'd do it myself if I could remember which episode it was from.

    Also:

    • In Marvel Comics, Kang the Conqueror has the Council of Cross-Time Kangs, formed to rule multiple realities. They clashed several times with the Avengers during their plans.

    I assume that's enough to save this example from zero-context-ness?
  • September 3, 2017
    Kartoonkid95
    • Gravity Falls: In "Double Dipper", Dipper discovers a magic photocopy machine and creates clones of himself to aid him in his ridiculously complicated plan to get Wendy to dance with him. However, when Dipper manages to get with Wendy just by talking to her, he decides he doesn't need his clones anymore, leading them to revolt and lock him in a closet to keep him from interfering with his own plan.
  • September 3, 2017
    mariovsonic999
    Fairly Oddparents: In "The Crimson Chin Meets Mighty Mom and Dyno Dad", Timmy called forth the many version of the Crimson Chin from the 30s Pulp Fiction version to the 80s Edgy version to defeat the Nega-Chin.
  • September 3, 2017
    longpinkytoes
    does Orphan Black count? they are all genetically identical

    though not different iterations of the same consciousness

    sampled from different points on the same time line
  • September 3, 2017
    Antigone3
    Timemaster: The "looper" was a piece of equipment that would let a time traveler bypass Only One Me Allowed Right Now (if it worked correctly, which was not guaranteed). The example of how it works was an agent who needed to confuse a computer-run security system — he looped himself six times, then walked past the security sensors while the computer tried to figure out which him was the real target.
  • September 4, 2017
    WolfMattGrey
    I don't think "same person at different points in time" examples should count, because unless time-travel creates divergent realities in the story, timelines aren't the same thing as alternate universes, which is what the draft seems to focus on.

    Edit: added examples, folders and made the non-timeline requirement explicit. Still need to justify context on some examples, check others and stuff.
  • September 4, 2017
    DustSnitch
    ^ I think your time travel mechanics may be overly restrictive. If someone changes so substantially over their life time that they essentially are alternate versions of the same person, I think it can practically be considered part of the same narrative trend as a group of actual alternatives.

    Take the examples from Doctor Who's "The Day of the Doctor", where the same character from centuries apart played by different actors team up, or Kingdom Hearts Dream Drop Distance, which is an example which combines Time Travel, Body Surfing, and a strange Pocket Universe to get a group of alternates together. The core idea is the same: speculative fiction characters uses the mechanics of speculative fictions to create a united group of duplicates.
  • September 5, 2017
    WolfMattGrey
    Um. For the purposes of this trope, "alternates" refers to those from another universe. Those from the same universe, no matter how similar to alternates, shouldn't count... but I guess it's really pretty ambiguous in some works like Doctor Who. (also I avoided some examples from other works because I'm not familiar enough with what happened but that can be corrected later) Clara Oswald seems to combine Alternate Self with Mes A Crowd and time travel, for example. So I guess I'll add DW examples if they're ambiguous enough (as in, not just time travel or cloning shenanigans).

    Also, I don't know if you're familiar with Homestuck, but its time travel mechanics are exactly what I mean. They always end up creating offshoot timelines that overlap in the game world. I should add examples soon enough.
  • September 5, 2017
    acrobox
    agree with dustsnitch.
  • September 6, 2017
    WolfMattGrey
    Alright, I think it's ready to launch. I loosened the time-travel mechanics to "okay if they're alternate timelines, not just My Future Self And Me" which seems to be confused with this trope quite a lot. (there are works where you stay in the same universe while time-travelling, and others where you go to alternate future/pasts, especially if you tried to change history) And as I said it's still very ambiguous for some works so I assume it's ok to add them. And it can always be tweaked later.Feel free to add any examples we may have overlooked on the finished page. Thanks for all your contributions.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=xve3rzqeqe8dbqx5oh3mow6r