Created By: EponymousKidAugust 30, 2013 Last Edited By: ArivneJuly 6, 2014

Supporting The Monster Son

Oh man your kid is a zombie -- time to chain him in the basement and kill people for him to feed on!

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
It can be hard when a loved one turns into a mindless, monstrous freak who only eats human flesh. For a lot of people, this is apparently the humane option — for said loved one, at least.


Examples

Comic Books
  • During the events of Blackest Night, the second Captain Boomerang killed people for his undead Black Lantern father to eat.
  • The villain in Hack Slash Meets Zombies Vs Cheerleaders is the school's football coach, who has been abducting students and chopping them up for his zombie son.

Western Animation
  • In one episode of South Park, Butters' parents believed their son dead and underwent a ritual to bring him back. When Butters returned home, they thought him an abomination, and tried to feed him a solicitor they killed.

Community Feedback Replies: 27
  • August 30, 2013
    Koveras
    • Happens in The Last Wish: King Foltest's daughter was born a monster, but instead of killing her, he decided to lock her up until a witcher came about who'd lift that curse (which Geralt does). The situation repeats in The Witcher video game.
  • August 31, 2013
    Lawman592
  • August 31, 2013
    Arivne
    Both the title and Laconic restrict this to children, but the description says "loved one" and the examples include a father.

    Also, the description limits this to eating human flesh, but shouldn't it include Vampiric Draining as well?

    To avoid Missing Supertrope Syndrome, I suggest changing the title, Laconic and description to include all loved ones and all forms of evil consumption, such as Im A Humanitarian and Vampiric Draining.

    Live Action TV
    • Friday The13th The Series episode "Night Prey". After a man finds out that his wife is a vampire, he captures her and imprisons her in his home. When she asks to be fed, he pays a prostitute to come to his home and his wife drinks her blood.
  • August 31, 2013
    Koveras
    Compare also Madwoman In The Attic.
  • August 31, 2013
    kjnoren
    Comic Books:

    • Prince Henry is mortally wounded and brain dead in the backstory of Heart of Empire (the sequel to The Adventures Of Luther Arkwright), but his mother Queen Anne refuses to let him die. Her efforts to save his life turns him into a monstrous blob feeding on human beings.
  • August 31, 2013
    FlyingDuckManGenesis
    • While not a monster per se, Hugo, Bart's conjoined brother from The Simpsons "Treehouse of Horror VII" segment, "The Thing and I" was treated like one. The two were separated at birth, and when it was discovered that Hugo was too evil to live in society, Homer and Marge kept Hugo locked up in the attic and fed him a bucket of fish heads once a week. It is revealed at the end of the segment that Bart was the true evil twin, as the evil twin is always on the left side, and Hugo's scar is on the right side, so the Simpsons put Bart in the attic and have dinner with Hugo.
  • August 31, 2013
    Bisected8
    • The Minotaur of Crete from Classical Mythology was the Queen's daughter (by a bull, thanks to a curse from the Gods; some versions have the bull in question as the one Heracles had to capture as one of his labours). In some versions anyway. The King kept his step-son in The Labyrinth and had sacrifices brought in (seven young men and seven young women a year) to feed him, until Theseus came along to slay it.
  • August 31, 2013
    EponymousKid
    Arivine: I'm open to suggestions; not married to the name, it was just the only thing I could think of. And there's a character limit for Laconic.

    I could also use help with the description, if anybody's interested.

    FDMG: That's just a regular Madwoman In The Attic. This is similar but distinct. Hugo's even the subject of the page quote on that one.
  • August 31, 2013
    DracMonster
    Also compare Fed To The Beast.

    Providing For The Flesh Eater? Or "Abomination"?

  • September 1, 2013
    DAN004
    Does it have to involve sacrificing people? o_O

    I thought the monster son can be anything and the mom can help him in any kind of ways. I'm thinking of the alien's mother in Dreamcatcher, though I have to rewatch it for context...
  • September 3, 2013
    DracMonster
    ^It wouldn't have to be limited to killing per-se, but if this is going to have reasonable boundaries (not just making dinner for normal kids,) it has to involve doing something reprehensible/squicky, and 90% of the examples are going to be some type of cannibalism. (The few that aren't could be shoehorned in comfortably, I think.)
  • September 3, 2013
    LikeSnowyNights
    Does this only accept supernatural examples? How about if the loved one is a serial killer or some sort of psychopath?
  • September 3, 2013
    randomsurfer
    In a Halloween episode of South Park Stan's mother thinks he's a serial killer (it's actually his new evil pet goldfish), so she chops up his kills and buries them in the basement in order to hide his crime.
  • September 4, 2013
    earnest
    A Zombie Advocate who is in denial about the truly monstrous nature of their loved one will probably do this.
  • September 4, 2013
    earnest
    Ooh! Another example that toes the line.

    TV
    • The Walking Dead had Hershel and his family keep a barn full of captured Walkers in the hope that someone would find a cure for them. They didn't feed them humans, thankfully, but occasionally released chickens into the barn to let them feed.

    And a straight example.

    Film
  • September 4, 2013
    DracMonster
    ^^^^ I think it should be limited to when you have to do murder or something similar for your charge to survive. Satisfying a psychopath's murder urges isn't necessary to keep them alive, and lacks the (slight) moral grayness.

    EDIT: Although now that I think about it, helping a loved one commit murder just because they're family is probably tropeable too, but would warrant on a separate page.
  • September 4, 2013
    Chernoskill
    The H.P. Lovecraft story "The Dunwich Horror" fits this trope. It's about a son whose real father is hinted at to be Yog-Sothoth and whose family keeps it in a secluded farmhouse over the years, during which it invariably grows and grows so the building has to be enlarged more and more, and cows from surrounding fields go missing, supposedly providing him with substenance. The son is not human at all but an invisible horrendous being too terrible to describe (as usual for Lovecraftian horrors, it has multiple extremities and tentacles). In the end, it grows so large that it breaks out from it's home and rampages across the countryside towards the site of an ancient ritual taking place that would bring doom to Dunwich if not the whole world. Luckily, a team from Arkham manages to kill it with a spell at the last minute.
  • September 5, 2013
    aurora369
    In The Elder Scrolls IV Oblivion DLC Shivering Isles, the conspiracy theorist Muurine lives with her uncle Leo. Uncle Leo is a zombie locked on the second floor of her house, and it appears that she still loves him and feeds him (judging by the fact that the zombie is non-hostile, he's well fed). Muurine also appears to be unaware what exactly is wrong with Uncle Leo, saying he's only "not feeling well".
  • September 9, 2013
    EponymousKid
    In the Borderlands "Zombie Island of Dr. Zed" DLC campaign, the player/s can encounter the zombie of their old pal TK Baha. TK, being an old blind man with one leg before he got killed, can't 'hunt' for his own food, so the player characters bring him brains. However, as the zombie outbreak claimed every living soul in Jakobs Cove, the brains come from other zombies; he doesn't seem to mind.

    I'll add this and other examples to the main draft soon as I can, by the by.
  • September 9, 2013
    Snicka
    In Brain Dead, Lionel does this to his mother when she turns into a zombie.
  • June 24, 2014
    Hero_Gal_2347
    Related to Zombie Advocate?
  • June 25, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ definitely. Mama Didnt Raise No Criminal as well.
  • June 25, 2014
    DAN004
    Again, I don't think the caretaker has to do crime for their abomination child. Just taking care of them like any other child - instead of, you know, dumping or even killing them - should count here.
  • June 30, 2014
    TheHandle
    I think the trope should be extended to cover people whose sons are psychopaths or otherwise metaphorical monsters, and who know it. Also note how it's related to Moral Myopia.

    • Jojos Bizarre Adventure: Yoshikage Kira's father's ghost is 100% supportive of his son's Serial Killer habits and will do anything and harm anyone as long as it keeps his beloved son happy.

    • Inverted in Game Of Thrones: Tyrion Lannister is no monster, only a dwarf, but his father and sister treat him like he was an evil monster from Hell.
  • July 6, 2014
    Arivne
    Tabletop Games
  • July 6, 2014
    Arivne
    • Capitalized the title.
    • Examples section formatting
      • Added a line separating the Description and Examples sections.
      • Added the word "Examples".
  • July 6, 2014
    JonnyB
    Re. the Walking Dead example above: The Governor likewise kept his deceased zombie daughter chained up in a closet and regularly fed it.

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