Created By: Pichu-kun on October 1, 2013 Last Edited By: PhantomDusclops92 on March 4, 2016
Troped

Early Installment Character Design Difference

A characters design looks different in early in the series

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Trope
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/zelda_thennow.jpg
Princess Zelda, then and now.

Early in the series any character is bound to have a characteristic look. It can go from Clothes Make the Legend, a Nice Hat, a particular hairstyle, etc.

While this is under Early Installment Weirdness, the specific part of Early Installment Design Difference is that this can be something that varies with Art Evolution, and some Character Development, as the Important Haircut, amongst others.

Some Webcomics use this as a Plot Point such as the characters' changing classes (in a gaming webcomic), or the author by some Art Evolution is removing the Limited Wardrobe trope from her/his arsenal.

Daughter of Early Installment Weirdness, Sister Trope to Costume Evolution and compared to Art Evolution.


Examples:

Anime And Manga
  • Several characters from Wandering Son had different hair colors early on. Takatsuki is the most noticeable, as they had brown for the first two volumes but it changed to black from thereon. Nitori's hair color darkened over time from a light brown to a dark brown but that's handwaved in-series as her hair darkening as she grows.
  • Naruto wore goggles in the pilot chapter and first few chapters before switching to a Ninja Headband. The Ninja Headband was created because Naruto's goggles were too difficult to draw.
  • Several characters from K-On!:
    • Yui wore Zettai Ryouiki early on in the manga before the author switched her over to Proper Tights with a Skirt.
    • Ritsu's bangs, which spill out from the side of her hair-band, weren't drawn as prominently in first chapters of the manga.
    • Mugi's distinctive eyebrows were drawn noticeably thinner in the earliest manga chapters.
  • In the first chapters of Yu-Gi-Oh! had some differences in character design:
    • Jono-Uchi's hairstyle was different, with normal bangs rather the outrageous pompadour we all know.
    • Anzu wore loose socks with her school uniform, while in later chapters her socks are normal.
    • The Pharaoh wore ankhs on his wrists.
  • Pokémon:
  • Berserk had one with the short called "Berserk Prototype". Guts notably had an eyepatch over his missing eye.
  • Black Lagoon: Revy didn't settle on her haircut until later in the series. This is one of few things the anime changed, there she has her haircut from the start.

Comic Books
  • In the early Superman stories the art had Supes occasionally have an additional S on his cape, the S symbol be smaller, and be on a more yellow background.
  • During Steve Ditko's run on Spider-Man, Spider-Man had noticeable, dramatic webs under his armpits. These mostly disappeared over time as other artists took over, to the point most people don't know they were ever part of the costume.
  • In the pilot to Sabrina the Teenage Witch Salem was a stereotypical black cat. In the series proper he was orange for several decades until a retcon occured due to the popularity of Sabrina the Teenage Witch live action adaptation.
  • Archie Comics:
    • Betty didn't begin wearing her signature Tomboyish Ponytail until several years after the series began. Her hair was usually down.
    • Archie originally had buckteeth. By The '70s they were gone.
    • Moose originally had an overly cartoony design.
  • Josie and the Pussycats started out as a Distaff Counterpart to the main Archie comics. Melody and Josie wore normal clothes for several years before they first put on their famous cat costumes.

Comic Strips
  • Peanuts:
    • In early strips Snoopy walked on all fours and was much more doglike in appearance and personality than he was in later strips.
    • Many of the characters, including Shroeder, Lucy, Linus and Sally, start off as babies or very young toddlers before aging to approximately the same age as the other characters. Charlie Brown and several other characters were originally four year olds but were aged up into eight year olds eventually.

Literature
  • The titular character of Arthur didn't even wear pants in the first book, he had a long nose for several books, and he did not wear his iconic cardigan at first. Francine didn't wear her signature red sweatshirt or blue jeans in the early books either, instead she wore a dresses (hich is something the current tomboy Francine almost never does.)

Live-Action TV
  • In Raumschiff Game Star, the eponymous starship crew's iconic "garbageman" uniforms didn't make an appearance until the second season. Ditto the bad guys' black hooded cloaks.
  • This happened on Bonanza as the clothing choices of the Cartwrights got changed to Limited Wardrobe so more Stock Footage could be used.
  • The uniforms in both pilot episodes of Star Trek were different, both from each other, and from those in the regular episodes.
  • The first two seasons of Red Dwarf have Rimmer in a khaki Space Corps uniform and Lister in a stained, shabby version of the same uniform, as opposed to Lister's leathers and Rimmer's shiny outfits in later seasons. The Space Corps uniform itself is changed retrospectively in flashbacks.
  • Sesame Street:
    • Throughout the first season there was a noticeable variation in Ernie's sweater. Rather than being strictly red and blue striped, it also had orange, yellow, and pink stripes in it as well.
    • Many Muppets had different designs early on and even throughout the years their designs have evolved. The Muppets Wiki has several pages dedicated to explaining the various designs. For example Kermit originally wasn't a frog, he was a Cartoon Creature until 1968 when Sesame Street aired. Big Bird originally had less feathers on his head, and the character that would become Cookie Monster had teeth prior to appearing on Sesame Street.
  • In Sherlock, the titular character did not start wearing his famous deerstalker until the second series. Perhaps the creators thought it would not fit with the character's modernisation, but were forced to backtrack on the decision due to the hat's iconic nature.
  • Hogan's Heroes. In the first two color episodes, LeBeau wears a navy blue sweater over his fatigues, rather than his usual red one. He may or may not have also worn it in the black-and-white pilot episode, as it is hard to determine, though it does appear to be a rather dark sweater.
  • Dinosaurs had a different look for Fran's head crest in the first couple of episodes.

Music
  • In The Beatles earliest performances they dressed in leather jackets and presented themselves as Greaser Delinquents. Once Brian Epstein became their manager he made them switch to the collarless suits everyone thinks of when they think "early Beatles."

Tabletop Games

Toys
  • Cheerilee from My Little Pony G3 was originally a unicorn with a slightly different coloring and a different Cutie Mark. For the "Core 7" soft reboot she became the previous Cherry Blossom with Cheerilee's name.

Video Games
  • Reimu and Marisa from Touhou, especially in the PC-98 era. Reimu started out wearing a much more plain and basic miko outfit, without the ribbons and her memetic armpits. She also had purple hair. Marisa, famous for her black-white witch dress, started out wearing purple. She also had red hair instead of blonde, although only in her first appearance.
  • Pokémon:
    • Red in Pokemon Red, Blue, and Green is depicted with bone straight hair in his sprites but has Anime Hair in his official design. This is likely because the prototypical version of him from Capsule Monsters had this hairstyle, and the sprites didn't change when his design did.
    • Blue's champion sprite in Red, Blue and Green has a hairstyle not even seen in any artwork.
    • Many Pokemon looked different in the sprites for the first two generations. For example Charmander had spikes according to most adaptations (excluding the anime), the original sprites, and early official art but they were removed by Gold and Silver. Pikachu were infamously very chubby looking at first but as early as Yellow began slimming down and by the third gen were in their current, thinner design.
  • Super Mario Bros.:
    • Mario had a blue shirt and red overalls until the colors were swapped around for the second title. Luigi had a brown shirt-green overall combo in his first appearance, and green shirt and white overalls (resembling the fire flower form) in Super Mario Bros. (Both of the remakes gave him back said brown shirt-green overall combo (or, in the case of the Super Mario All Stars version, the blue shirt-green overalls) , and made this costume his fire flower form instead).
    • In Super Mario Bros., Toad wore a red vest. The western version of Super Mario Bros. 2 changed it to dark blue in game, while in the artworks it was more purple. Super Mario Bros. 3 brings back the red vest, but the blue/purple one came back in subsequent games... until Super Mario Sunshine introduced, along with various Toads with differently colored vests and mushroom spots, a yellow trim around the vest, which was kept since then.
    • Daisy wore a purple crown in her older appearances, but somewhere around Mario Kart Double Dash it was replaced with a golden one like Peach's one. Her hair was also long like Peach until it was cropped shorter in Mario Party 4.
    • Starting from Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour, Birdo wears a ring with a giant diamond on her right middle finger.
    • Wario originally wore a long-sleeved shirt, but since Wario Land II he's often been seen wearing a short-sleeved one. He's consistently portrayed with short sleeves in Wario's own games however in the Mario spinoffs he alternated between them and the long sleeves before permanently settling on the short ones.
  • Street Fighter:
    • In the very first Street Fighter game - which is often forgotten - Ryu has reddish hair and wears a pair of red shoes. Odd considering that in the games chronologically after it, he Does Not Like Shoes and he has it pointed out numerous times.
    • In the very first Street Fighter game, Birdie is a fair-skinned light-toned man. In his next chronological appearance (Street Fighter Alpha), he's Black and slightly bulkier. He explains: "I was pale because I was sick!"
  • Mega Man X: In his first appearance (in the first game), Zero has circular shoulders and lacks his Z-saber. In the second game, where he was rebuilt after he was destroyed one game before, he gets a new square shoulders with his signature Z on it, and his Z-saber as well, which is retained throughout the rest of the series. His design also becomes a bit pointier.
  • In the Rayman series, the titular character started out with separated eyes and a red handkerchief on his neck, but starting with Rayman 3: Hoodlum Havoc, Rayman gained Conjoined Eyes and a red hoodie in place of the handkerchief.
  • The Legend of Zelda:
    • There are multiple incarnations of Link, which explains his design differences from game to game, however overall Link follows a basic design. The original Link from The Legend of Zelda I and Zelda II: The Adventure of Link had dark brown hair however starting with The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past he's been varying degrees of blond ever since. Link originally had a long nose however, after internal complaints that he wasn't attractive with his nose, Link's nose size was decreased in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. Early Link's also didn't wear pants underneath their tunics.
    • Princess Zelda similarly has been multiple people but overall she shares certain traits. The Zelda from the first game and the Sleeping Zelda from the second game are a brunette and redhead respectively. The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past was the first game to have Zelda as a blonde and every game has kept that, though The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess Zelda has hair so dark it's mistakable for brown. The Zelda's were drawn with simplistic, puffy pink dresses and '80s Hair until the third game. ALTTP showed the beginning of her standard design form: a white dress with gold trimmings and either pink or purple accents.
  • Ratchet & Clank (2002) is the only Insomniac Games Ratchet game - Secret Agent Clank and Ratchet & Clank: Size Matters both have the same Ratchet design but are made by High Impact Games - to have Ratchet with no shirt and no shoes (unless you equip the Magneboots or Grindboots from the items menu for a cosmetic effect). Every other game, he has some sort of armor or clothing that covers those bits.
  • Marth in the first Fire Emblem Akaneia game did not wear pants and wore a tunic. His clothes are styled after his design in the third game, Mystery Of The Emblem

Web Comics
  • The Order of the Stick: Burlew has played with this trope a few times and it is shown with Haley's hair (cut really short in one point, to recovering it to look like Lady Godiva at a small panel joke, before returning to normal since Long Hair Is Feminine). At a point in story it goes short and comments on some of the clothes used in the past of the comic.
  • 8-Bit Theater: The sprites change when the party changes jobs with the rat tail soup.
  • City Of Dream: While some characters act on the Limited Wardrobe, some others have taken this route. Jessica in particular has stopped cosplaying Momo, and moved onto a somewhat varied wardrobe of pants and shirts.

Western Animation
  • Rugrats:
    • Tommy wore a red shirt in both the unaired pilot and the actual pilot for the show. After that his signature color became blue, and his main outfit became a blue shirt.
    • In the "All Growed Up" Special, the ten-years-older versions of the Rugrats had clothes that had similar color schemes to the clothes they wore as infants. When All Grown Up!! was spun off into its own series, the characters had outfits that were very different to the ones in the special, especially in the later seasons of the show.
  • The titular character from Caillou wore a grey shirt in the early episodes but once he turned four he began wearing a yellow version.
  • Betty Boop was originally a dog however later her species was changed to a human.
  • In the first The Simpsons shorts appearing on The Tracey Ullman Show Bart wore a blue shirt, but as of the switch to their own show he wears orange. Despite the change happening so early, a lot of merchandise in The '90s had Bart wearing a blue shirt.
  • Muffy from Arthur had buck teeth in early seasons.
  • Several times in The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius. The most noticeable differences are that in Jimmy Neutron Cindy had Girlish Pigtails instead of a ponytail and a pink shirt instead of a green one while Jimmy had shorts, instead of jeans, and different shoes. In the series proper, Libby originally wore a green dress and had straight hair with Peek-a-Bangs. Starting with episode 21 she switched to cornrows and starting with episode 25 she began wearing jeans and a pink shirt.
  • Transformers:
    • In the first episode of The Transformers, Shockwave was shown with both hands. Later he got his signature laser gun replacing his left hand.
    • The first episode of Transformers Animated have some design differences: Sentinel Prime is shown with a white face rather than grey, a longer head with a smaller chin and smokestacks on his shoulders, while Blackarachnia had the spider abdomen on her back splitted in two coattails, lacked two of the spider eyes on her chest and an extra pair of spider legs on her shoulders.
  • In My Little Pony: Rescue from Midnight Castle Megan is depicted with cowboy boots, an orange shirt, a brown vest, and jeans. In the sequel she receives a Girliness Upgrade in terms of colors (they're now pastel) but keeps the general design. Come My Little Pony 'n Friends and her design is given a total rehaul. She now wears somewhat frilly overalls with a heart in the middle.
  • Classic Disney Shorts:
    • Donald Duck's iconic sailor suit changed considerably over the years. In his first appearance in Wise Little Hen, the hat had a stiff brim, rather than the floppy hat he now has. Also, the hat was white until the early forties, and the bow on his collar changed from black to red. And for a brief period in the 1950s, the buttons on his shirt disappeared.
    • For his first appearance in Mickey's Revue, Goofy (then known as Dippy Dawg) wore only a vest, glasses and no pants; only the hat is recognizable. This look (sans glasses) was revived for the Mickey Mouse (2013) shorts.
    • Mickey Mouse's and Minnie Mouse's original designs had them with larger eyes and didn't wear gloves or shoes. The gloves were added later to make sure that you still see their hands even if they held them across their stomachs. Shortly after, they had shoes and gloves, and their eyes became simple black dots. In 1939, their eyes became more "human" eyes to give them more expression.
    • Minnie also had a hat with a flower in it, but it was changed to a large bow by 1939. Traditionally she wore a skirt with no shirt however nowadays it's more common for her to wear a dress, though the skirt sometimes still appears.
  • Jem:
    • Clash originally had red hair with blue highlights. After a few appearances she was given completely purple hair and a future episode shows her natural hair is purple.
    • Zipper was blond at first before becoming black haired and with noticeably blue eyes.
    • Lindsey originally had straight hair in a different style instead of curly hair.
    • The "Starbright" pilot episodes feature different designs from the actual series. Jem's pink belt became white. Jerrica's pink and blue striped dress with a red belt, a hat and pink shoes, became white and blue striped with a white belt, without hat and blue shoes. Pizzazz received an bracelet, she lost a legband, and switched her sock to ther other leg. Roxy's top became purple instead of black, her tights became multicolored instead of pink and green, she lost her necklace, received a bracelet, her belt changed shape, and received new shoes.
  • In season 1 of The Amazing World of Gumball, Penny was oval-shaped. In season 2, she became peanut-shaped.
  • The second season of The Dreamstone made some changes to character designs following a switch with animation studios. The Dream Maker in particular, originally wearing a more humble patchwork robe, now wears a far more dignified attire. Rufus and Amberley had more differentiating proportions (Rufus gained a bulkier upper body while Amberley became lankier) and had their clothing streamlined. The swords on both Rufus and the Urpneys' belts (that they never used) are now gone too. To a lesser degree Zordrak's robe changed from purple to blue.
  • Sandy from Spongebob Squarepants, Sandy's underwater suit was changed to have a hole for her tail Season Two onwards. She also didn't have an acorn on her suit originally.
Community Feedback Replies: 89
  • October 1, 2013
    justanotherrandomlurker
    This could be a sister trope to my YKTTW Extreme Character Makeover.
  • October 1, 2013
    FlyingDuckManGenesis
    Here's an expansion for the Rugrats example:

    • In the "All Growed Up" Special, the ten-years-older versions of the Rugrats had clothes that had similar color schemes to the clothes they wore as children. When All Grown Up! was spun off into its own series, the characters had outfits that were very different to the ones in the special, especially in the later seasons of the show.
  • October 1, 2013
    NotJim99
    Here's a possible example:
    • Cindy Vortex from Jimmy Neutron Boy Genius wore a pink shirt in the movie but later switched to a green one in the show.
  • October 1, 2013
    paycheckgurl
    In the early Superman stories the art had Supes occasionally have an additional S on his cape, the S symbol be smaller, and be on a more yellow background.

    During Steve Ditko's run on Spider Man, Spider-Man had noticeable, dramatic webs under his armpits. These mostly disappeared over time as other artists took over, to the point most people don't know they were ever part of the costume.
  • October 1, 2013
    RandomSurfer
    In the first Simpsons shorts appearing on The Tracey Ullman Show Bart wore a blue shirt, but as of the switch to their own show he wears orange.
  • October 2, 2013
    TrueShadow1
    • Reimu and Marisa from Touhou, especially in the PC 98 era. Reimu started out wearing a much more plain and basic miko outfit, without the ribbons and her memetic armpits. She also had purple hair. Marisa, famous for her black-white witch dress, started out wearing purple. She also had red hair instead of blonde, although only in her first appearance.
  • October 2, 2013
    Koveras
    • In Raumschiff Gamestar, the eponymous starship crew's iconic "garbageman" uniforms didn't make an appearance until the second season. Ditto the bad guys' black hooded cloaks.
  • October 2, 2013
    KarjamP
    The Mario example can be expaned:

    • Mario from Super Mario Bros had a blue shirt and red overalls until the colors were swapped around for the second title. Luigi had a brown shirt-green overall combo in his first appearance, and green shirt and white overalls (resembling the fire flower form) in Super Mario Bros. (Both of the remakes gave him back said brown shirt-green overall combo (or, in the case of the Super Mario All Stars version, the blue shirt-green overalls) , and made this costume his fire flower form instead,).
  • October 2, 2013
    robinjohnson
    • The uniforms in both pilot episodes of Star Trek were different, both from each other, and from those in the regular episodes.
    • The first two seasons of Red Dwarf have Rimmer in a khaki Space Corps uniform and Lister in a stained, shabby version of the same uniform, as opposed to Lister's leathers and Rimmer's shiny outfits in later seasons. The Space Corps uniform itself is changed retrospectively in flashbacks.
  • October 2, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    isn't this by nature already covered by Early Installment Weirdness?

    i highly doubt costume design remains the same in any work from start to finish:

    they always work on improving the design. it'd probably better to list aversions instead.
  • October 2, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ Sub Tropes are by definition The Same But More Specific - but with numerous enough examples to be notable.

    And no, it isn't that universal.
  • October 2, 2013
    Pichu-kun
    Would hairstyles go under this trope? I'm thinking of making this trope should be more "general fashion" than just clothes.

    I know of a few examples:

    • Several times in The Adventures Of Jimmy Neutron Boy Genius. The most noticeable differences are that Jimmy Neutron Cindy had Girlish Pigtails instead of a ponytail while Jimmy had shorts, instead of jeans, and different shoes. In the series proper, Libby originally wore a green dress and had straight hair with Peek A Bangs. Starting with episode 21 she switched to cornrows and starting with episode 25 she began wearing jeans and a pink shirt.
    • Red in Pokemon Red, Blue, and Green is depicted with bone straight hair in his sprites but has Anime Hair in his official design. This is likely because the prototypical version of him from "Capsule Monsters' had this hairstyle and the sprites didn't change when his design did. Blue's sprite also has a hairstyle not seen in any artwork when he's a Champion.
  • October 3, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^^ no, i meant Early Installment Weirdness already implies elements present early in the series and were eventually replaced/improved. and now that i think of it, yeah, this is worth a trope, just not simply about clothing, because that's too narrow. also, this seems related to You Dont Look Like You.
  • October 3, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ You Dont Look Like You is when the shift is too large and makes the character no longer noticeable.
  • October 3, 2013
    SKJAM
    This happened on ""Bonanza'' as the clothing choices of the Cartwrights got changed to Limited Wardrobe so more Stock Footage could be used.
  • October 3, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^^ i did say "seems" didn't I?
  • October 3, 2013
    Pichu-kun
    You Dont Look Like You mostly refers to adaptations and extremely large design changes, not something little like a new shirt or hair design.
  • October 3, 2013
    paycheckgurl
    Comics examples need to separated into two separates bullets; it's two separate examples (sorry if that wasn't clear when I listed them).
  • October 3, 2013
    DAN004
    • In the very first Street Fighter game - which is often forgotten - Ryu has reddish hair and wears a pair of red shoes. Odd considering that in the games chronologically after it, he Does Not Like Shoes and he has it pointed out numerous times.
  • October 4, 2013
    Alucard
    I entered these examples on the K On Character Page. They can be moved here.

    • Yui wore Zettai Ryouiki early on in the manga, before the author switched her over to Proper Tights With A Skirt.
    • Ritsu's bangs, which spill out from the side of her hair-band weren't drawn as prominently in first chapters of the manga.
    • Mugi's distinctive eyebrows were drawn noticeably thinner in the earliest manga chapters.
  • October 4, 2013
    DAN004
    Another for Street Fighter
    • In the very first Street Fighter game, Birdie is a fair-skinned light-toned man. In his next chronological appearance (Street Fighter Alpha), he's black and slightly bulkier. He explains: "I was pale because I was sick!"
  • October 5, 2013
    justanotherrandomlurker
    The new title is a bit too ambiguous, it doesn't really specify when a character's signature style of wardrobe or clothing or whatever wasn't quite the same as it became later on, and again, it almost makes this sound more similar to the YKTTW Extreme Character Makeover.

    But here's an example to contribute: Live Action TV
    • Throughout the first season of Sesame Street, there was a noticable variation in Ernie's sweater, rather than being strictly red and blue striped, it also had orange, yellow, and pink stripes in it as well.
  • October 5, 2013
    KarjamP
    ^ It's a Snowclone of Early Installment Weirdness, for which this is the subtrope of.
  • October 8, 2013
    PhantomDusclops92
    Let's add some more stuff!

    • In the first chapters of Yu Gi Oh had some differences in character design:
      • Jono-Uchi's hairstyle was different, with normal bangs rather the outrageous pompadour we all know.
      • Anzu wore loose socks with her school uniform, while in later chapters her socks are normal.
      • And the Pharaoh had shark teeth and ankhs on his wrists.
    • In the first episode of The Transformers, Shockwave was shown with both hands. Later he got his signature laser gun replacing his left hand.
    • Similarly, the first episode of Transformers Animated have some design differences: Sentinel Prime is shown with a white face rather than grey, a longer head with a smaller chin and smokestacks on his shoulders, while Blackarachnia had the spider abdomen on her back splitted in two coattails, lacked two of the spider eyes on her chest and an extra pair of spider legs on her shoulders.
  • October 8, 2013
    troacctid
    Isn't this covered under Art Evolution?
  • October 9, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ Some of these, yeah, when it happens to be subtle. But sometimes it isn't. Art Evolution is broader.
  • October 9, 2013
    Cider
    Is there any pressing reason for this page? Is art evolution or early instalment weirdness getting to unwieldy? Otherwise I say no, we should not launch this page. The Same But More Specific is something we should be making efforts to avoid.
  • October 9, 2013
    KarjamP
    It doesn't have to be an example of Art Evolution if it's an example of this trope.

    An example of this would be everything under Live Action TV, due to the nature of the medium having all the characters be in the same "artstyle" unless they're computer generated or are puppets (that's if they don't make the puppet look different).

    Likewise, it doesn't have to be an example of this trope in order for it to count as Art Evolution.

    An example of this is characters that don't generally wear clothing or have little clothing (like Garfield, Pokemon, Sonic The Hedgehog, Kirby, etc.).
  • October 9, 2013
    Cider
    So that is one down, does not explain the need for separation from Early Installment Weirdness.
  • October 10, 2013
    KarjamP
    DAN 004's argument:

    Sub Tropes are by definition The Same But More Specific - but with numerous enough examples to be notable.

    And no, it isn't that universal.
  • October 10, 2013
    FlyingDuckManGenesis
    I had two more examples, but deleted them when I realized they generally wore little to no clothing.

  • December 7, 2013
    TonyG
    • Donald Duck's iconic sailor suit changed considerably over the years. In his first appearance in Wise Little Hen, the hat had a stiff brim, rather than the floppy hat he now has. Also, the hat was white until the early forties, and the bow on his collar changed from black to red. And for a brief period in the 1950s, the buttons on his shirt disappeared.
    • For his first appearance in Mickey's Revue, Goofy (then known as Dippy Dawg) wore only a vest, glasses and no pants; only the hat is recognizable. This look (sans glasses) was revived for the Disney Channel Mickey Mouse shorts.
  • December 7, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    Namespaced and italicized a bunch of examples.
  • December 7, 2013
    Chabal2

  • May 23, 2014
    DAN004
    • Mega Man X: In his first appearance (in the first game), Zero has circular shoulders and lacks his Z-saber. In the second game, where he was rebuilt after he was destroyed one game before, he gets a new square shoulders with his signature Z on it, and his Z-saber as well, which is retained throughout the rest of the series. His design also becomes a bit pointier.
  • May 23, 2014
    ZuTheSkunk
    • In the Rayman series, the titular character started out with separated eyes and a red handkerchief on his neck, but starting with Rayman 3 Hoodlum Havoc, Rayman gained Conjoined Eyes and a red hoodie in place of the handkerchief.
  • May 24, 2014
    Alucard
    That Donald Duck example made me realize: any character that reaches a certain age will ultimately become an example of Art Evolution, over this trope. I already gave a hat to this one, but the distinction from Art Evolution for older characters will have to eventually be made.
  • May 24, 2014
    Mr.Movie
    In Dragon Ball, Goku didn't acquire his iconic Turtle School Gi (a special type of clothing for martial artists) until after his training with Roshi.

    Also, it has my hat.
  • May 24, 2014
    DAN004
    Taking hat. Description needs improvement.
  • May 25, 2014
    KarjamP
    ^How does it need improvement?
  • May 25, 2014
    GingerSnaps
    It's far too short and could stand to be a little less colloquial.
  • I'm noticing some of the more recent edits to the draft are examples that have already been covered by the YKTTW Extreme Character Makeover; I think we should limit this to noticable differences in a character's signature outfit or wardrobe, and keep differences in a character's overall design as a whole (to wit, the Big Bird, Kermit, and Cookie Monster examples) to Extreme Character Makeover.

    That said, here's this:

    Live Action TV
    • Hogans Heroes. In the first two color episodes, LeBeau wears a navy blue sweater over his fatigues, rather than his usual red one. He may or may not have also worn it in the black-and-white pilot episode, as it is hard to determine, though it does appear to be a rather dark sweater.
  • June 3, 2014
    KyleJacobs
    Wouldn't this already be under Art Evolution?
  • ^ I can't speak for or explain this one, but as mentioned in Extreme Character Makeover, whereas Art Evolution is a natural evolution of a character's overall look and design over a gradual amount of time, Extreme Character Makeover is where a character's look and design are radically overhauled at any given point in a work's lifespan (like from one season to another). For example, in the first season of Sesame Street, Oscar the Grouch was bright orange, then afterwards, he was changed to green as per the request of Jim Henson, who thought he looked better green (and the in-universe explanation was Oscar went on vacation to a swampy resort where the atmosphere was so damp and murky that it turned his fur green overnight).

    What this seems to be is like a sister trope, where instead a character's overall appearance is radically changed, it's just that character's signature wardrobe being noticably different in earlier installments.
  • June 3, 2014
    TonyG
    I suggest changing the title to Early Installment Wardrobe Weirdness, to make it clear that it's about the character's clothing.
  • June 4, 2014
    needsanewhobby
    • In Sherlock, the titular character did not start wearing his famous deerstalker until the second series. Perhaps the creators thought it would not fit with the character's modernisation, but were forced to backtrack on the decision due to the hat's iconic nature.
  • June 4, 2014
    Psi001
    • The second season of The Dreamstone made some changes to character designs following a switch with animation studios. The Dream Maker in particular, originally wearing a more humble patchwork robe, now wears a far more dignified attire. Rufus and Amberley had more differentiating proportions (Rufus gained a bulkier upper body while Amberley became lankier) and had their clothing streamlined. The swords on both Rufus and the Urpneys' belts (that they never used) are now gone too. To a lesser degree Zordrak's robe changed from purple to blue.
    • A small case with Spongebob Squarepants, Sandy's underwater suit was changed to have a hole for her tail Season Two onwards.

      • Concerning the Bart example, it's worth noting merchandise such as plushes and shirts even into the late nineties still had Bart with his original blue shirt.
  • September 25, 2014
    Cider
    Is there a reason why someone wouldn't just put this on Early Installment Weirdness or Art Shift? Seems completely unnecessary to me.
  • September 25, 2014
    acrobox
    Or Art Shifted Sequel, or just a function of Time Skip
  • September 26, 2014
    Pichu-kun
    It's a sub trope of Early Installment Weirdness referring to the characters designs.
  • November 18, 2014
    PhantomDusclops92
    • Other Mario redesigns:
      • In Super Mario Bros., Toad wore a red vest. The western version of Super Mario Bros. 2 changed it to dark blue in game, while in the artworks it was more purple. Super Mario Bros. 3 brings back the red vest, but the blue/purple one came back in subsequent games... until Super Mario Sunshine introduced, along with various Toads with differently colored vests and mushroom spots, a yellow trim around the vest, which was kept since then.
      • Daisy wore a purple crown in her older appearances, but somewhere around Mario Kart Double Dash it was replaced with a golden one like Peach's one.
      • Starting from Mario Golf: Toadstool Tour, Birdo wears a ring with a giant diamond on its right middle finger.
      • Wario originally wore a long-sleeved shirt, but since Wario World he wears a short-sleeved one.
    • In season 1 of The Amazing World Of Gumball, Penny was oval-shaped. In season 2, she became peanut-shaped.
    • The original design of King Dedede wore only a hat, a coat and a belly sash. Later he started wearing what looks like a kimono under the coat and sash. The coat's design also had some changes in years: in some earlier representations the picture on his back was the one of Dedede giving the peace sign similar to the one that appeared on the boss battle doors of Kirby's Adventure, but starting from the anime it was replaced with a more stylized design that could be interpreted either as Dedede's hand giving the peace sign or a bunny head.
  • December 11, 2015
    Kartoonkid95
    Mickey and Minnie's original designs had them with larger eyes and didn't wear gloves or shoes. Shortly after, they had shoes and gloves, and their eyes became simple black dots. In 1939, their eyes became more "human" eyes to give them more expression.

    Minnie also had a hat with a flower in it, but it was changed to a large bow by 1939.
  • December 12, 2015
    randomsurfer
    In The Beatles earliest performances they dressed in leather jackets and presented themselves as Greaser Delinquents. Once Brian Epstein became their manager he made them switch to the collarless suits everyone thinks of when they think "early Beatles."
  • December 12, 2015
    DragonQuestZ
    The description needs to start with the definition, not a link to another trope. It implies we have to know what that trope means before we understand this trope. Worse Clothes Make The Legend belongs more on the contrast line.

    A Sister Trope to Costume Evolution.

    • In the first two The Legend Of Zelda games Princess Zelda was drawn as a redhead in a puffy pink dress, while the third game showed the beginning of her standard design form: a white dress with gold trimmings and either pink or purple accents.
  • December 12, 2015
    Pichu-kun
    It's a placeholder description. Someone else should fix it since I'm not good at doing descriptions.
  • December 12, 2015
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ Okay, perhaps we can help,

    Also putting either this picture or part of this picture of Princess Zelda right next to this later picture could make a great trope image.
  • December 12, 2015
    Mauri
    On the description and examples (sorry if I had to put my work as an example but it jumped on the memory, if it bothers you then don't add it to the list):

    Early in the series any character is bound to have a characteristic look. It can go from clothes make the legend, losing weight, change hairstyle, etc.

    While this is under Early Installment Weirdness, the specific part of Early Installment Design Difference is that this can be something that varies with Art Evolution, and some character development, as the important haircut, amongst others.

    Some Webcomics use this as a Plot Point such as the characters' changing classes (in a gaming webcomic), or the author by some Art Evolution is removing the Limited Wardrobe trope from her/his arsenal.

    Daughter of Early Installment Weirdness, Sister Trope to Costume Evolution and compared to Art Evolution.

    Examples: Webcomics
    • The Order of the Stick: Burlew has played with this trope a few times and it is shown with Haley's hair (cut really short in one point, to recovering it to look like Lady Godiva at a small panel joke, before returning to normal since long hair is feminine). At a point in story it goes short and comments on some of the clothes used in the past of the comic.
    • Eight Bit Theater: The sprite change when the party changes jobs with the rat tail soup.
    • City of Dream: While some characters act on the Limited Wardrobe, some others have taken this route. Jessica in particular has stopped cosplaying Momo, and moved onto a somewhat varied wardrobe of pants and shirts.
  • December 12, 2015
    Pichu-kun
    No, that's a fine enough description. Thanks.
  • December 12, 2015
    Mauri
    Did leave a slip up in the early part of the introduction and I have just noticed; edit any mess ups as noticed:

    Early in the series any character is bound to have a characteristic look. It can go from clothes make the legend, a nice hat, a particular hairstyle, etc.

    • Reason for this edit: to make sure it is less confusing on the starting point.

    Also you can always use the pencil button next to some comments to copy the original comment so you don't have any broken links.
  • December 13, 2015
    NESBoy
    The Wario example is wrong. The short sleeved shirt actually first appeared in Wario Land II, his second adventure. While the short sleeves were consistently portrayed in Wario's own games, in the Mario spinoffs he alternates between them and the long sleeves before permanently settling on the short ones.
  • December 13, 2015
    henke37
    • Black Lagoon: Revy didn't settle on her haircut until later in the series. This is one of few things the anime changed, there she has her haircut from the start.
  • December 13, 2015
    DAN004
    Speaking of haircut, I thought Haruhi Suzumiya had long hair at first, but then she cuts it short, but I don't know the series enough to add more info...
  • December 13, 2015
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ See it's entry on Important Haircut. But it was the first episode, so it wouldn't fall under this.
  • December 13, 2015
    JoeG
    • Peanuts
      • In early strips Snoopy walks on all fours and is much more doglike in appearance and personality than he was in later strips.
      • Also, many of the characters, including Shroeder, Lucy, Linus and Sally, start off as babies or very young toddlers before aging to approximately the same age as the other characters.
  • December 14, 2015
    randomsurfer
    ^Including Charlie Brown and his contemporaries, who age up from 4 to 8 and then stay there.
  • December 14, 2015
    DragonQuestZ
    Does this look like a good picture?

    The markup is included below.

    Princess Zelda, then and now.

    [[quoteright:260:Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/zelda_thennow.jpg]]

    [[caption-width-right:260:Princess Zelda, [[VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink then]] and [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess now]].]]
  • December 14, 2015
    DragonQuestZ
    Also, the trope name doesn't specify this is about character designs. It seems like a trope for the whole look of the series changing over time (which can still be a trope).

    Perhaps Early Installment Character Design would be more clear.
  • December 14, 2015
    Mauri
    Well the picture is fitting and I guess the idea is just to get the examples running.

    Mmm character design can also land on some notes as well but that is on the whole "what could have been" territory if some of the initial ideas were to have been kept.
  • December 15, 2015
    chicagomel
    • Dinosaurs had a different look for Fran's head crest in the first couple of episodes.
  • December 16, 2015
    Pichu-kun
    ^^^^ I am uncertain if that'd be a good image or not considering those are two separate individuals. I suppose it could work fine for now though. I was gonna go with that Arthur image that gets thrown around the internet but we already use it for Anthropomorphic Shift.
  • December 16, 2015
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ But still Legacy Characters, and the various Links have shared similar looks.
  • December 16, 2015
    Mauri
    If not you can always check on Ganondorf looks to go with the design of the legacy character.

    If not there are other options available...
  • December 17, 2015
    DragonQuestZ
    Edited the OP so the picture was right-aligned.
  • December 17, 2015
    Pichu-kun
    Thanks.

    The trope name is okay sounding, right? Or is it too wordy?
  • December 17, 2015
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ I noted in a previous post that it was too broad. If this is about character design, it needs to note that. So Early Installment Character Design would work better. Otherwise it may be confused for the overall look and design of a series (which would be a separate trope).
  • December 17, 2015
    Pichu-kun
    Better?
  • December 17, 2015
    DragonQuestZ
    I guess. Any other things you want to take care of before launching?
  • December 18, 2015
    Mauri
    Well I'd say examples. To see if some others appear before sorting the current ones in alphabetical order before the launch.
  • December 18, 2015
    MegaMarioMan
    You want an example?

    Ratchet And Clank 2002 is the only Insomniac Games Ratchet (Secret Agent Clank and Ratchet And Clank Size Matters both have the same Ratchet design but are made by High Impact Games) game to have Ratchet with no shirt and no shoes (unless you equip the Magneboots or Grindboots from the items menu for a cosmetic effect). Every other game, he has some sort of armor or clothing that covers those bits.
  • December 18, 2015
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ That might fit on Costume Evolution, since it's just giving him clothes, not his face, fur, or body design.
  • December 27, 2015
    WalterSmith
    Woody Woodpecker: the titular character's first design was much more goofy and simplier than his other incarnations. His feet were bulkier, his tail feathers were green colored and he had no gloves at all. Not to mention he had buck teeth!

  • February 8, 2016
    BrokenEye
  • February 8, 2016
    DAN004
    NVM
  • February 8, 2016
    Pichu-kun
    I could have sworn this had more hats a few weeks ago and it doesn't seem launched... Maybe my memory is off.
  • February 8, 2016
    Snicka
    Does this count?

    • In the early comics, Garfield walked on all fours, was much chubbier and had very small eyes. The comic went through a lot of Art Evolution until Garfield reached his current, iconic look.
  • February 8, 2016
    Pichu-kun
  • February 8, 2016
    mariovsonic999
    How about Marth in the original. For the record, he has no pants and wear a tunic which is downright forgotten while his design in the cover box of Mystery of the Emblem pretty much stick and his wardrobe in Super Smash Bros. and Shadow Dragon looks more like the latter.
  • February 17, 2016
    TitoMosquito
    In Beetlejuice, Mayor Maynot has a different design each season. His first design is a short monster in classic mayor attire (Ă  la mayor in The Nightmare Before Christmas), and the second season design resembles a mummy or an invisible man in bandages dressed as a more modern mayor.
  • March 4, 2016
    Pichu-kun
    ^ Is that conscious choice of the character or was he redesigned?

    So, is this launch-worthy yet?
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