Created By: GentlemensDame883 on June 9, 2013 Last Edited By: ShanghaiSlave on July 2, 2014

Cops 'n Clubbers

Using baton as your Weapon of Choice.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Alt title: Nightstick It To Em

Call them truncheons, coshs, billysticks, nightsticks, prods or what-have-you. Shorter than a Simple Staff, different enough from a generic club to be distinct, the baton is the melee Weapon of Choice of cops, guards and their ilk.

Depending on the portrayal on the police force, a baton can be a heroic weapon, a standard issue Mook weapon, or a symbol of fear. Sometimes used to perform a Tap on the Head; however, modern UK training discourages it due to the possibility of fatal injury.

The Old-Fashioned Copper trope in general also tends to invert the trope, since the "no-nonsense" versions prefer guns (in works set at the time when British officers carried them), while the amicable Dixon of Dock Green types prefer old-fashioned truncheons. In feudal Japan, the jitte (basically a metal truncheon with a prong for hooking the opponent) was strongly associated with officers and served as their badge of office.

Compare Dual Tonfas, Sai Guy (close to the jitte), Carry a Big Stick, Batter Up.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Anime and Manga 

    Comic Books 

    Fanfic 

    Film 
  • In Like Flint. General Carter's Z.O.W.I.E. guards use expandable batons to fight Flint in the document incinerator room.
  • In Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol a nebbishy rookie cop (played by Tim Kazurinsky) uses his police baton to totally destroy a trio of gangbangers.
  • The protagonist of The Raid uses a nightstick and combat knife to deadly results.
  • Inspector Ma from Sha Po Lang uses a telescoping baton, in a rare heroic example.
  • In Demolition Man, in the future city of San Angeles, the police are armed with batons... which can discharge electric currents.

    Literature 
  • The Provost's Guard in the Beka Cooper books use short, sturdy batons because they lack the lethal implications of edged weapons.
  • In The Iron Dream, truncheons are the favourite melee weapon in Held. Feric Jaggar, their leader chosen by fate, wields the Steel Commander.
    "The shaft as a gleaming rod of some tarnishless metal fully four feet long and thick around as a man's forearm etched all around with rich red traceries of lightning strokes, a motif which made the huge shaft appear as if it had but recently been quenched in blood. The oversize headball was a life-sized steel fist, and a hero's fist at that."

    Live Action Television 
  • In one episode of CSI, a Tabletop game invented by Hodges (which features Flanderised versions of the cast) has a Brutal version of Brass who threatens a suspect with a collapsible truncheon (which he's never been shown with in the series thus far).
  • Dixon of Dock Green strongly averts the Police Brutality aspect of the trope, only using his truncheon to protect the public and generally being an all round Nice Guy.
  • Hostages has Sandrine Renault aka Maria Gonzales use a collapsible baton to restrain the Sanders patriarch in the first episode by hitting the back of his head.
  • The Elementary rendition of Sherlock Holmes practices singlestick for self-defense, considering it a simple and elegant fighting style. He makes use of it with a collapsible metal baton in "M." to capture the Serial Killer who he thought killed Irene Adler.
  • One episode of New Tricks has Jack trying to reconcile with an old friend who has never forgiven Jack for joining The Met and cites the massed baton charges employed by said force during the UK miner's strikes of the mid-80s.
  • A Season Five episode of The Detectives has the hapless duo trying to rescue their boss's grand-daughter from an environmental protest before the Met's Territorial Support Group do a raid. Or as Bob describes them due to their brutality:
    "The BYOB squad; Bring Your Own Baton!"

    Video Games 
  • Abstergo guards in Assassin's Creed games.
  • Priere from La Pucelle uses a baton to beat the crap out of her enemies. This carries to her appearances as an Overlord in later Nippon Ichi games.
  • Cerberus Assault Troopers and Centurions in Mass Effect 3.
  • The most obvious example, Mortal Kombat's own local cop, Kurtis Stryker, who utilizes a night stick alongside other conventional weapons like his handguns.
  • In Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance, the cyborg Dirty Cops in Denver use these.
  • Captain Vor in Warframe. Zero-Context Example
  • In Parasite Eve 2 the protagonist is an FBI agent (for a fictional branch called MIST that deals with mutated monsters). The weapons you start off with are a pistol and a police baton (which also happens to be the only exclusively melee weapon in the game).
  • Half-Life 2: Combine Civil Protection officers wield stun batons that they use when dishing out their particular brand of justice.
  • In Final Fight and Street Fighter games, Rolento the ex-soldier fights with a baton and an acrobatic, speedy style.
  • The Imperial Agent's Non-Player Companion SCORPIO in Star Wars: The Old Republic uses electrostaffs, which are pretty common weapons in the game, except that her custom electrostaffs always seem to look like police batons—quite fitting her profile, as she is basically a robotic prison warden who spent most of her existence herding criminals on the prison planet of Belsavis.
  • Final Fantasy
    • In Final Fantasy XIII, most melee-type enemies of the Corps (military/police organization of Cocoon) category wield batons in battle. Some higher-level PSICOM (e.g. Huntress) and Sanctum (e.g. Inquisitrix) enemies have them, as well.
    • Jihl Nabaat in Final Fantasy XIII wields a swagger stick as a weapon but isn't fought until a DLC battle in the the sequel
    • Shinra Infantrymen wield police batons in Final Fantasy VII and Crisis Core alongside their assault rifles. The Turk Reno also wields a collapsible shock baton fitting of his corporate thug image.
  • Dynasty Warriors
    • Zhuge Dan uses a Nightstick in DW 8. Fitting for a strategist with authority.

    Western Animation 
  • In the South Park episode "Chicken Lover", Cartman is handed a baton when he's deputized. He uses it indiscriminantly on whoever doesn't "respect my authoritah!"

    Real Life 


Does Not Count Bin

  • Practitioners of escrima will often wield batons, either single or dual.
  • The Equalist Lieutenant in The Legend of Korra dual wields a pair of escrima sticks that can deliver electric shocks from a generator on his back.
    • Taishi Ci used Twin Rods in 5 and 7 onwards for his hard-hitting Power Type fighting style, since they're pretty much weaponized Rolling Pin of Doom minus one handle on one end.
  • In Art of Fighting, Mr. Big dual wields batons to fight you.
  • Kirsten Dunst's character in Small Soldiers beats the living crap out of a bunch of animated dolls with a cheerleader's baton.
  • In Rhythmic Pretty Cure, Cure Clubs's main weapon is a single club that looks like a cross between a traditional rhythmic gymnastics club apparatus, a marching band majorette's baton, and the Cutie Moon Rod.
  • Nightwing wields a pair of escrima sticks as his primary weapon.
  • Daredevil's weapon of choice is a baton that doubles as a Grapplinghook Gun.
  • Ranma : Marital Arts Cheerleading uses a cheerleader's baton as one of its associated weapons.
Community Feedback Replies: 97
  • June 9, 2013
    Koveras
    • In Final Fantasy XIII, most melee-type enemies of the Corps (military/police organization of Cocoon) category wield batons in battle. Some higher-level PSICOM (e.g. Huntress) and Sanctum (e.g. Inquisitrix) enemies have them, as well.
  • June 9, 2013
    eowynjedi
    • The Provost's Guard in the Beka Cooper books use short, sturdy batons because they lack the lethal implications of edged weapons.
  • June 9, 2013
    Bisected8
    • In one episode of CSI, a Tabletop game invented by Hodges (which features Flanderised versions of the cast) has a Corrupt Cop version of Brass who threatens a suspect with a collapsible truncheon (which he's never been shown with in the series thus far).
    • Dixon Of Dock Green strongly averts the Corrupt Cop aspect of the trope, only using his truncheon to protect the public and generally being an all round Nice Guy.

    The Old Fashioned Copper trope in general also tends to invert the trope, since the "no-nonsense" versions prefer guns (in works set at the time when British officers carried them), while the amicable Dixon Of Dock Green types prefer old-fashioned truncheons. In feudal Japan, the jitte (basically a metal truncheon with a prong for hooking the opponent) was strongly associated with officers and served as their badge of office.

    Thinking about it, are you sure that only corrupt cops tend to use batons? I'd say they're more weapons that are associated with police and guards in general.
  • June 9, 2013
    Generality
    Compare Dual Tonfas.
  • June 9, 2013
    GentlemensDame883
    Good point, Bisected8. I'll change that part of the description.
  • June 9, 2013
    MrRuano
    • The most obvious example, Mortal Kombat's own local cop, Kurtis Stryker, who utilizes a night stick alongside other conventional weapons like his handguns.
  • June 9, 2013
    RandomSurfer
    In Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol a nebbishy rookie cop (played by Tim Kazurinsky) uses his police baton to totally destroy a trio of gangbangers.
  • June 10, 2013
    Arivne
    Sometimes used to perform a Tap On The Head.

    Film
    • In Like Flint. General Carter's Z.O.W.I.E. guards use expandable batons to fight Flint in the document incinerator room.
  • June 10, 2013
    TrueShadow1
    • Priere from La Pucelle uses a baton to beat the crap of her enemies. This carries to her appearances as an Overlord in later Nippon Ichi games,
  • June 10, 2013
    Larkmarn
    ... that name is terrible. Not only does the rhyme... thing not work, the problem with using baton is that for a lot of people a baton is something that marching bands twirl. And "Baton Me" in particular sounds like someone at a track event asking someone to pass them a baton.

  • June 10, 2013
    Koveras
    The association of batons with corrupt police probably comes from countless video footage showing the police driving off protesters with them.
  • June 11, 2013
    GentlemensDame883
    I'd welcome any alternate name suggestions.
  • June 12, 2013
    henke37
    I Thought It Meant Grievous Harm With A Body, you might want to pick a different name.
  • June 12, 2013
    GentlemensDame883
    ... I'm afraid I don't see how you make that connection, henke37. :S
  • June 12, 2013
    Larkmarn
    As in "The Baton is Me." It's tenuous, but so is the current name anyway.

    How about Nightstick It To Them? Cosh Combat? Baton Battler (though that sounds like a Magical Girl to me)?
  • October 17, 2013
    KZN02
    Hero Factory: One of Stormer 2.0's weapons.
  • October 17, 2013
    kjnoren
    I'm not sure simply using a club as a weapon is trope-worthy, and I think the weapon tropes should try to give some meaning to why they are carried or used.

    In this case, I think the key word is authority - the carrier of a baton is indicated to be an officer of law and order. That also gives the baton a connection with the various ceremonial maces, the sceptre, and the marshal's baton.

    So I think a good name would be Baton Of Authority or similar.

    Literature:

    • In The Iron Dream, truncheons are the favourite melee weapon in Held. Feric Jaggar, their leader chosen by fate, wields the Steel Commander.
      "The shaft as a gleaming rod of some tarnishless metal fully four feet long and thick around as a man's forearm etched all around with rich red traceries of lightning strokes, a motif which made the huge shaft appear as if it had but recently been quenched in blood. The oversize headball was a life-sized steel fist, and a hero's fist at that."
  • October 17, 2013
    Bisected8
    ^ What about Baton Of Office (as a pun on "Badge of Office")?
  • October 17, 2013
    DRCEQ
    ^ That's even worse than the original suggested name.
  • October 17, 2013
    StarSword
    Page quote:

    M: You!
    Sherlock Holmes: Me! Baton! (clubs M in the head)
    — "M.", Elementary

    TV:
    • The Elementary rendition of Sherlock Holmes practices singlestick for self-defense, considering it a simple and elegant fighting style. He makes use of it with a collapsible metal baton in "M." to capture the Serial Killer who he thought killed Irene Adler.
  • October 17, 2013
    Quantumawsome
    I like "Nightstick it to 'em" as a name.
  • October 18, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ Lovin' that.

    • In Demolition Man, in the future city of San Angeles, the police are armed with batons... which can discharge electric currents.
  • October 18, 2013
    KarjamP
    Combat Baton as a possible name?

    ^^ Might be decrided for violating No New Stockphrases.

    Also, kjnoren does have a point.

    The baton has to be related to storytelling in order for this to be a trope.

    Or else it can be decrided for violating "People Sit On Chairs".
  • November 9, 2013
    Bisected8
    • In Parasite Eve 2 the protagonist is an FBI agent (for a fictional branch called MIST that deals with mutated monsters). The weapons you start off with are a pistol and a police baton (which also happens to be the only exclusively melee weapon in the game).

    Personally, I think we should stick with "cops use batons". There only seem to be one or two examples of batons listed so far that aren't some sort of law enforcement or guard.

  • November 10, 2013
    arbiter099
  • November 10, 2013
    Scrounge
    Kirsten Dunst's character in Small Soldiers beats the living crap out of a bunch of animated dolls with a cheerleader's baton. Or maybe a marching band baton. Anyway... Does that count?
  • November 11, 2013
    Alvin
    Live-Action TV TJ Hooker liked to throw his at a running perp's legs.
  • March 8, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    Fan Fiction
    • In Rhythmic Pretty Cure, Cure Clubs's main weapon is a single club that looks like a cross between a traditional rhythmic gymnastics club apparatus, a marching band majorette's baton, and the Cutie Moon Rod.

    For examples like this, though, I would really like for either this or a separate but related trope to be called Baton Battler.
  • March 9, 2014
    DAN004
  • March 9, 2014
    Koveras
    • The Imperial Agent's Non Player Companion SCORPIO in Star Wars The Old Republic uses electrostaffs, which are pretty common weapons in the game, except that her custom electrostaffs always seem to look like police batons—quite fitting her profile, as she is basically a robotic prison warden who spent most of her existence herding criminals on the prison planet of Belsavis.
  • March 9, 2014
    DAN004
    Add the examples plz?
  • March 9, 2014
    TonyG
    In the South Park episode "Chicken Lover", Cartman is handed a baton when he's deputized. He uses it indiscriminantly on whoever doesn't "respect my authoritah!"
  • March 9, 2014
    StarSword
    I liked Quantumawsome's suggestion of Nightstick It To Em for the title.
  • March 9, 2014
    lycropath
    Western Animation Comic Books
    • Nightwing wields a pair of escrima sticks as his primary weapon.
    Video Games
  • March 9, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    covered by Simple Staff.

    I'd argue we don't need this for the same reason we don't need every variation of Blade On A Stick.
  • March 9, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    Does Simple Staff also cover the use of batons by Magical Girls?
  • March 9, 2014
    Elbruno
    Video Games
    • In Left 4 Dead 2 this is one of the available melee weapons for the survivors, having one of the fastest attack rates among them but poor swing coverage.
  • March 9, 2014
    DAN004
  • March 9, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    Or Magic Wand, but I don't see the Cutie Moon Rod (which is a major influence on the design of Tsumugi/Cure Clubs's Precise Baton) listed on either trope, so apparently there may be a separate trope for Magical Girl Warriors who use batons.
  • March 10, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ then go list it.
  • March 10, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    Just read Kjnoren's post above here. dood have a point.

    We already have Staff Of Authority for police batons and nightsticks (explicitly mentioned in the description).

    so I guess remaking this to Baton Battler for Majorettes and Magical Girls are fair game?

    BTW, I think eskrima sticks are distinct from batons. it has a similar connotations to Wooden Katanas Are Even Better from what little I know about the martial art.
  • March 10, 2014
    Koveras
    The description of Staff Of Authority does not mention it being used as a weapon, so as far as I can gather, that trope is about the symbolic significance of the sticks, rather than weaponizing them. I think the OP had stumbled onto tropability with the association of a baton and law enforcement, so I think something along the lines of Lawman Baton would be a good trope title.
  • March 10, 2014
    DRCEQ
    Combat Baton or Baton Battler. One of those two needs to be the name for this trope. The current name is still horrible. It shouldn't be a pun off some type of phrase.
  • March 10, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ Dunno, many weapon tropes have fun names. Not sure if we should keep it that way or not. :P
  • March 10, 2014
    BaffleBlend
    Battle Baton?

    I didn't even realize the current name was supposed to be a pun. It sounds more... well, kinky than punny.
  • March 10, 2014
    CrypticMirror
    • One episode of New Tricks has Jack trying to reconcile with an old friend who has never forgiven Jack for joining The Met and cites the massed baton charges employed by said force during the UK miner's strikes of the mid-80s.

    • A Season Five episode of The Detectives has the hapless duo trying to rescue their boss's grand-daughter from an environmental protest before the Met's Territorial Support Group do a raid. Or as Bob describes them due to their brutality:
      "The BYOB squad; Bring Your Own Baton!"
  • March 10, 2014
    DracMonster
    Seconding Baffle Blend's Battle Baton (heh,) good call.
  • March 10, 2014
    Larkmarn
    Since OP hasn't done anything on this in a long time, this is automatically Up For Grabs if someone wants it. I suppose I'll take it if no one's really itching for it.
  • March 10, 2014
    StarSword
    ^Go for it, Larky.
  • March 10, 2014
    Paradisesnake
    Thirding Battle Baton.
  • March 10, 2014
    lycropath
    I place my vote in Nightstick It To Em
  • March 10, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ That's better as a redirect, I guess
  • March 10, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    Batons are just shorter Simple Staff, The Same But More Specific. the fighting style. majorette baton fighting, police nightstick fighting, gangster using a Pipe Pain, is more tropeable IMO.
  • March 11, 2014
    jatay3
    The phrase "using a baton as a weapon" is awkward. It implies it is an Improvised Weapon when a nightstick is supposed to be a weapon.
  • March 11, 2014
    DAN004
    If Larkmarn doesn't wanna grab this, I will...
  • March 11, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    Yes, Dan, and please retool it to something more tropeable.
  • March 12, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ I'm not in my computer now, though. Maybe later.
  • March 12, 2014
    Larkmarn
    All yours. I was at a "well, I don't WANT to take this over, but I will" so if you have any actual desire to do it, it's all you.
  • March 13, 2014
    TwoGunAngel
    Practitioners of escrima will often wield batons, either single or dual.
  • March 14, 2014
    AP
  • March 14, 2014
    SKJAM
    • Ranma One Half: Marital Arts Cheerleading uses a cheerleader's baton as one of its associated weapons.
  • March 14, 2014
    DAN004
    Gonna add examples, though not all at once
  • March 20, 2014
    DAN004
    All examples added. Phew! Now gonna call for hats...

    BTW I argue that this shouldn't be limited to policemen or other kind of lawgivers. Oh, and I would say that jitte examples are allowed as well.
  • March 20, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    • Dynasty Warriors
      • Zhuge Dan uses a Nightstick in DW 8. Fitting for a strategist with authority.
      • Taishi Ci used Twin Rods in 5 and 7 onwards for his hard-hitting Power Type fighting style, since they're pretty much weaponized Rolling Pin Of Doom minus one handle on one end.

    I still think Martial Arts Stick, Magical Girl/Majorette style Baton Battler are separate tropes from this. Simple Staff doesn't really quite cut it for those when it comes to connotation.
  • March 20, 2014
    CrypticMirror
    The Ranma one is covered by Martial Arts And Crafts and seems a better fit there.
  • March 20, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    May I make a formatting correction to a broken folder?
  • March 20, 2014
    Paradisesnake
    ^ You don't really need to ask permission for something like that...
  • March 20, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    I just want to make sure it's OK with DAN004 before acting.
  • March 20, 2014
    lycropath
    I still think Martial Arts Stick, Magical Girl/Majorette style Baton Battler are separate tropes from this. Simple Staff doesn't really quite cut it for those when it comes to connotation.

    Couldn't we just make a different note to the different types of batons say different things about the wielder kind of like The Baroness? Or are the three types just to distinct to share a page?
  • March 20, 2014
    DAN004
    @P.Snake: go right ahead, dude.
  • March 20, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    Thanks. Wait... who are you talking to? Just wondering.
  • March 20, 2014
    Paradisesnake
    ^ He was talking to me... for some reason? :D

    EDIT: Namespaced a bunch of examples + removed a duplicate Parasite Eve 2 example.
  • March 20, 2014
    DAN004
    Lol.
  • March 21, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    lycropath

    no. they have different story purpose.

    we should make them separate for the same reason we make Broomstick Quarterstaff, Batter Up, Rolling Pin Of Doom,Cane Fu ,Telephone Polearm , Pipe Pain, Wrench Whack, Crowbar Combatant separate.

    these are all "sticks" and yet they all have different meanings. despite all of them being used simply for whacking people.

    Majorette Batons are impractical as "baseball bats", but work well as a "martial arts staff", they are also often used with a girly fighting style. escrima sticks has a similar connotation with Dual Tonfas. Cops using Nightsticks may be part of their fighting style or them resorting to use their Emergency Weapon, so may not have a Martial Arts connotation.
  • March 21, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    The Baroness has two variations with one meaning. so it don't compare with the ones i've mentioned.

    "A badass, frigid, sadistic, and dominant villainess." the variations are "old and experienced" vs "young and sexy".
  • March 26, 2014
    DAN004
    Bump.
  • March 30, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    In Happiness Charge Pretty Cure, Cure Honey's weapon of choice is the Triple Dance Honey Baton, which has three modes: "baton", "ribbon", and "maracas". It can also be used as a microphone.
  • April 2, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    I still think this one is lumping too many weapons into one trope. I mean come on, we have BFS, Royal Rapier, Machete Mayhem, Heroes Prefer Swords. why must we lump weapons with different connotations in one place?
  • April 2, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ please elaborate.
  • April 3, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^ Been there done that
    lycropath

    no. they have different story purpose.

    we should make them separate for the same reason we make Broomstick Quarterstaff, Batter Up, Rolling Pin Of Doom,Cane Fu ,Telephone Polearm , Pipe Pain, Wrench Whack, Crowbar Combatant separate.

    these are all "sticks" and yet they all have different meanings. despite all of them being used simply for whacking people.

    Majorette Batons are impractical as "baseball bats", but work well as a "martial arts staff", they are also often used with a girly fighting style. escrima sticks has a similar connotation with Dual Tonfas. Cops using Nightsticks may be part of their fighting style or them resorting to use their Emergency Weapon, so may not have a Martial Arts connotation.
  • April 3, 2014
    DAN004
    So what I can see here:
    • Police batons (the very first idea)
    • Majorette/cheerleading batons
    • Escrima sticks and other martial arts sticks

    Am I missing something?
  • April 3, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    no, those are exactly what i've noticed so far.
  • April 3, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ now how should we handle those?
  • April 3, 2014
    crazysamaritan
    I don't see why martial arts sticks cannot be covered by Simple Staff, although I do understand why Law Enforcement batons is a separate trope from that one.
  • April 3, 2014
    DAN004
    I see... so escrima sticks and the like shouldn't count.
  • April 8, 2014
    DAN004
    Pruning out unfitting examples, though I put it in their special section for now
  • April 8, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    If it's the majorette/cheerleading batons that don't count, this may as well get another rename.
  • April 8, 2014
    DAN004
    One that refers to cops or other law enforcers, preferably.
  • April 8, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    The Fighting Clubbers?

    As for the majorette/cheerleading batons trope, I'll create a separate YKTTW called Baton Battler and have the orphaned examples transferred there as necessary.
  • April 8, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    changed the title to something humorously confusable with cops and nightclub goers for now.

    Cops With A Stick?

    also, move this in a new YKTTW DAN 004. too many useless comments.
  • April 8, 2014
    StarSword
    Fan Works:
    • In Red Fire Red Planet, among the tools of the trade of Starfleet Security Ensign Kate McMillan is something called a "stunstick".
  • April 8, 2014
    StarSword
    TV:
    • In the Blue Bloods episode "Critical Condition" Jamie and an academy classmate get an assignment leaving out a bag of goods on a park bench to see if anyone will steal it (the idea being that folks who do little crimes also do big ones). When a guy they catch resists arrest, Jamie goes for Good Old Fisticuffs but his partner pulls out a collapsible metal baton and hits the guy. Hard.
  • April 8, 2014
    DAN004
    I'm not in my computer right now so I'll make a new ykttw later.
  • April 9, 2014
    aurora369
    In Dunno on the Moon, much emphasis on the brutality of the Lunar police is made with help of the fact that they wantonly use their batons with built-in stun guns. Note that this was written before an electric stun baton became real-world police equipment.
  • July 1, 2014
    KantonKage
    Lawman Baton has already been launched.
  • July 2, 2014
    AgProv
    Quick correction: the hooks at the base of the Japanese jitte, according to authority Stephen Turnbull, were used to catch and deflect a samurai sword blade. A skilled user of the jitte could catch a sword blow, pull the swordsman off balance, twist the jitte, and disarm the stroppy samurai.

    Real Life: the Rodney King business in LA that saw several LAPD cops get over-enthusiastic with their nightsticks, lie about it afterwards, and provoke major rioting.

    A similar incident at a demonstration in London saw a riot copper gratuitously lash out with his baton at a hapless guy who was just walking by - he lived locally and had no connection at all with the demonstration. This was caught on film. The man died later and the cop lied about his actions, the Met tried to cover it up, but he was named at the inquest and attracted a shitstorm of protest.
  • July 2, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ please add those into Lawman Baton, thank you.
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