Cops 'n Clubbers
Using baton as your Weapon of Choice.
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(permanent link) added: 2013-06-09 08:17:59 sponsor: GentlemensDame883 edited by: ShanghaiSlave (last reply: 2014-07-02 03:15:22)

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Alt title: Nightstick It To Em

Call them truncheons, coshs, billysticks, nightsticks, prods or what-have-you. Shorter than a Simple Staff, different enough from a generic club to be distinct, the baton is the melee Weapon of Choice of cops, guards and their ilk.

Depending on the portrayal on the police force, a baton can be a heroic weapon, a standard issue Mook weapon, or a symbol of fear. Sometimes used to perform a Tap on the Head; however, modern UK training discourages it due to the possibility of fatal injury.

The Old-Fashioned Copper trope in general also tends to invert the trope, since the "no-nonsense" versions prefer guns (in works set at the time when British officers carried them), while the amicable Dixon Of Dock Green types prefer old-fashioned truncheons. In feudal Japan, the jitte (basically a metal truncheon with a prong for hooking the opponent) was strongly associated with officers and served as their badge of office.

Compare Dual Tonfas, Sai Guy (close to the jitte), Carry a Big Stick, Batter Up.


Examples:

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    Anime and Manga 

    Comic Books 

    Fanfic 

    Film 
  • In Like Flint. General Carter's Z.O.W.I.E. guards use expandable batons to fight Flint in the document incinerator room.
  • In Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol a nebbishy rookie cop (played by Tim Kazurinsky) uses his police baton to totally destroy a trio of gangbangers.
  • The protagonist of The Raid uses a nightstick and combat knife to deadly results.
  • Inspector Ma from Sha Po Lang uses a telescoping baton, in a rare heroic example.
  • In Demolition Man, in the future city of San Angeles, the police are armed with batons... which can discharge electric currents.

    Literature 
  • The Provost's Guard in the Beka Cooper books use short, sturdy batons because they lack the lethal implications of edged weapons.
  • In The Iron Dream, truncheons are the favourite melee weapon in Held. Feric Jaggar, their leader chosen by fate, wields the Steel Commander.
    "The shaft as a gleaming rod of some tarnishless metal fully four feet long and thick around as a man's forearm etched all around with rich red traceries of lightning strokes, a motif which made the huge shaft appear as if it had but recently been quenched in blood. The oversize headball was a life-sized steel fist, and a hero's fist at that."

    Live Action Television 
  • In one episode of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, a Tabletop game invented by Hodges (which features Flanderised versions of the cast) has a Brutal version of Brass who threatens a suspect with a collapsible truncheon (which he's never been shown with in the series thus far).
  • Dixon Of Dock Green strongly averts the Police Brutality aspect of the trope, only using his truncheon to protect the public and generally being an all round Nice Guy.
  • Hostages has Sandrine Renault aka Maria Gonzales use a collapsible baton to restrain the Sanders patriarch in the first episode by hitting the back of his head.
  • The Elementary rendition of Sherlock Holmes practices singlestick for self-defense, considering it a simple and elegant fighting style. He makes use of it with a collapsible metal baton in "M." to capture the Serial Killer who he thought killed Irene Adler.
  • One episode of New Tricks has Jack trying to reconcile with an old friend who has never forgiven Jack for joining The Met and cites the massed baton charges employed by said force during the UK miner's strikes of the mid-80s.
  • A Season Five episode of The Detectives has the hapless duo trying to rescue their boss's grand-daughter from an environmental protest before the Met's Territorial Support Group do a raid. Or as Bob describes them due to their brutality:
    "The BYOB squad; Bring Your Own Baton!"

    Video Games 
  • Abstergo guards in Assassin's Creed games.
  • Priere from La Pucelle uses a baton to beat the crap out of her enemies. This carries to her appearances as an Overlord in later Nippon Ichi games.
  • Cerberus Assault Troopers and Centurions in Mass Effect 3.
  • The most obvious example, Mortal Kombat's own local cop, Kurtis Stryker, who utilizes a night stick alongside other conventional weapons like his handguns.
  • In Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance, the cyborg Dirty Cops in Denver use these.
  • Captain Vor in Warframe. Zero-Context Example
  • In Parasite Eve 2 the protagonist is an FBI agent (for a fictional branch called MIST that deals with mutated monsters). The weapons you start off with are a pistol and a police baton (which also happens to be the only exclusively melee weapon in the game).
  • Half-Life 2: Combine Civil Protection officers wield stun batons that they use when dishing out their particular brand of justice.
  • In Final Fight and Street Fighter games, Rolento the ex-soldier fights with a baton and an acrobatic, speedy style.
  • The Imperial Agent's Non-Player Companion SCORPIO in Star Wars: The Old Republic uses electrostaffs, which are pretty common weapons in the game, except that her custom electrostaffs always seem to look like police batons—quite fitting her profile, as she is basically a robotic prison warden who spent most of her existence herding criminals on the prison planet of Belsavis.
  • Final Fantasy
    • In Final Fantasy XIII, most melee-type enemies of the Corps (military/police organization of Cocoon) category wield batons in battle. Some higher-level PSICOM (e.g. Huntress) and Sanctum (e.g. Inquisitrix) enemies have them, as well.
    • Jihl Nabaat in Final Fantasy XIII wields a swagger stick as a weapon but isn't fought until a DLC battle in the the sequel
    • Shinra Infantrymen wield police batons in Final Fantasy VII and Crisis Core alongside their assault rifles. The Turk Reno also wields a collapsible shock baton fitting of his corporate thug image.
  • Dynasty Warriors
    • Zhuge Dan uses a Nightstick in DW 8. Fitting for a strategist with authority.

    Western Animation 
  • In the South Park episode "Chicken Lover", Cartman is handed a baton when he's deputized. He uses it indiscriminantly on whoever doesn't "respect my authoritah!"

    Real Life 


Does Not Count Bin

  • Practitioners of escrima will often wield batons, either single or dual.
  • The Equalist Lieutenant in The Legend of Korra dual wields a pair of escrima sticks that can deliver electric shocks from a generator on his back.
    • Taishi Ci used Twin Rods in 5 and 7 onwards for his hard-hitting Power Type fighting style, since they're pretty much weaponized Rolling Pin of Doom minus one handle on one end.
  • In Art of Fighting, Mr. Big dual wields batons to fight you.
  • Kirsten Dunst's character in Small Soldiers beats the living crap out of a bunch of animated dolls with a cheerleader's baton.
  • In Rhythmic Pretty Cure, Cure Clubs's main weapon is a single club that looks like a cross between a traditional rhythmic gymnastics club apparatus, a marching band majorette's baton, and the Cutie Moon Rod.
  • Nightwing wields a pair of escrima sticks as his primary weapon.
  • Daredevil's weapon of choice is a baton that doubles as a Grapplinghook Gun.
  • Ranma : Marital Arts Cheerleading uses a cheerleader's baton as one of its associated weapons.
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