Created By: AFP on September 30, 2012 Last Edited By: Bobchillingworth on July 21, 2013
Troped

Damage Control

After a base or city is badly damaged, work must be done to repair it.

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Trope
There is a base, or a ship, or a city, where our heroes spend their time throughout the story. It may either be the location where most of the story takes place, or it could be a set piece only seen once in a while. Through some course of events, be it an enemy attack, or a natural disaster, or some kind of accident, everything has pitched into a state of chaos. People are wounded, equipment damaged, chaos and confusion reigns supreme, and everything is on fire.

The first order of the day, aside possibly from dealing with the cause of the damage, is putting out the fires, tending to the wounded, and repairing the damage so everything can go back to normal. Expect all this to be going on even as the driving crisis that caused everything is still ongoing. The main characters will often be split apart and unable to communicate with each other or rely upon each other directly. Expect at least one character to reach down inside himself and find the resolve and resourcefulness he needs to solve a major problem without the team mates he normally relies on. The Engineer and the Old Soldier will be at their best here, leading leading their men in the dangerous and critical work of getting everything operational again.

The trope draws its name from an expression used on naval and merchant vessels, for urgent repair work that is done while the ship is at sea. If unsuccessful, our characters will often be forced to segue directly into Abandon Ship.

Note: when applying this trope to video games, it should only be done when dealing with such repairs as a plot point, as opposed to game mechanics centering on unit healing or repair.

Comic Books
  • Appropriately enough, a comic series called Damage Control centered around a group of people tasked with cleaning up after the destructive fights between superheroes and villains in the Marvel Comics universe.

Film
  • Seen in U-571 as they try to get a damaged submarine under control before they get too deep.
  • Seen in quite a few Star Trek movies:
    • In Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, the Enterprise is taken by surprise in the initial attack, but Kirk and Spock are able to turn the tables and deal some swift damage to Reliant. Both ships are forced to withdraw and effect repairs before they can fight again. In the final battle, both ships are again crippled, and it is only a Heroic Sacrifice by Mr. Spock that allows them to survive.
    • In Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home when Kirk asks when they can get their captured Bird-of-Prey under way, Scotty quips, "Damage control is easy; reading Klingon, that's hard."
    • The space battle in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country has Scotty doing his usual thing while the Enterprise is pummeled by torpedoes.
    • Again, during the battle in Star Trek: Generations, Geordi LaForge is seen ordering his repair teams around, although it ultimately turns out to be futile.
    • In Star Trek: Insurrection the Enterprise gets into another space fight. It's not really seen, but right before it starts, LaForge leaves the bridge for Engineering, knowing what he's going to be doing in short order.
    • The Star Trek II scene is mirrored in Star Trek Into Darkness, this time the roles are reversed. Spock is commanding the battle and Kirk is the one who does the Heroic Sacrifice to repair the ship before it crashes or burns up in Earth's atmosphere.
  • A villainous example in Iron Eagle, due to Chappie and Doug hitting the airfield first, and Colonel Nakesh gives his men one hour to reopen the airfield.
  • In The Avengers, Iron Man and Captain America have to do repairs on the Airborne Aircraft Carrier at 30,000 feet after Hawkeye attacks and blows up one of its engines.
  • Star Wars:
    • The Phantom Menace: After Trade Federation battleships shoot out the shield generators on the royal cruiser, R2-D2 and several other astromechs are called out to fix it. R2 gets it done but all the other droids are blown away in the process.
    • The Empire Strikes Back: Han and Chewbacca are shown trying to get a malfunctioning hyperdrive online while being pounded by Imperial Star Destroyers.

Literature
  • In The Hunt for Red October the sub takes damage in a fight with another sub and has to be repaired.
  • Red Storm Rising had a number of instances, notably the damaged USS Nimitz limping back into port after being struck by missiles, a soviet freighter carrying troops and equipment having to fight fires after being strafed by F-15s, the seawater used to put them out inadvertently ruining a lot of missiles that had planned to install in their new base. It isn't seen, but it's obvious that this is what's going on aboard the ill-fated USS Providence. Finally, the Soviets manage to take over a USAF base in Iceland, and when the Americans attack trying to render it useless, cratering the runways, the Soviets use the repair materials the Americans themselves had left in the event of such an occasion and have them back in use before nightfall.
  • Happens fairly often in the Honor Harrington series, particularly in the books that center on one or two ships. Books which focus on fleet actions will mention the damage control in passing, rather than focusing on it in depth.
    • On Baselisk Station shows some of the issues that a crew of a ship in battle have to deal with. When the missile launchers on one side of the ship are damaged, along with the automated systems for transferring missiles from one magazine to another, crewmembers have to move the missiles by hand with the assistance of anti-gravity rigs, which make the missile weightless, but do not eliminate its inertia, causing one crewmember to be crushed (nonfatally) against the wall when the ship takes a hit.
  • In the Warrior Cats series, a forest fire burns through ThunderClan's territory in the fourth book. In addition to killing several cats and driving out all the prey, the camp itself was destroyed. They have to try and rebuild it with whatever little they have left to work with, and try to get back to a normal lifestyle, before the other Clans take advantage of their vulnerability.
  • The Argo II in The Mark of Athena takes frequent damage through the course of the book, but since they are attacked almost every time they set down they have to do a lot of repairs on the fly, in one case their means of escape does almost as much damage as the attack, meaning Leo has to do some fast work just to keep the ship from flying apart. Another time after being attacked by a sea monster Leo got washed overboard so the others, under Annabeth's direction, had to do enough repairs to keep them from sinking.

Live-Action TV
  • Battlestar Galactica (1978) episode "Fire in Space". Cylon raiders ram the Galactica in suicide attacks, causing fires to break out throughout the ship. Several of the crew are trapped and Commander Adama is injured.
  • Battle Star Galactica Reimagined had this on more than one occassion, as the Galactica often came under attack by the Cylons. The miniseries had many of the damage control personnel get Thrown Out the Airlock when the Galactica officers were forced to vent the atmosphere from part of the ship in order to put the fires out before it was too late.
  • Frequently seen in various Star Trek episodes after the ship takes damage. Notable in Star Trek: Voyager where they had to do many repairs themselves.
  • Babylon 5:
    • A subtle example: Part of the station (one of the fork-like protrutions on the top of the station for handling cargo) is blown off during a battle with an attacking ship in the season 2 finale. In the season 3 intro, the damaged section can be seen re-attached and surrounded by scaffolding.
    • The season 4 episode Endgame has a fleet of ships get crippled due to the heroes' sabotage just before the final battle of the season. The repairwork isn't shown, but is discussed soon after, and later referenced in passing when one of these ships arrives during the final battle just in time to save the Aggamemnon.
    "Engineering, this is General Lefcourt. In case you didn't notice, the enemy just pulled our shorts up over our head and tied them into a knot. You will get the ship under control ASAP, or I will come down there and skin the hide off every last one of you."
  • In the first episode of Last Resort the crew of the USS Colorado are shown repairing the sub after a missile attack.
  • Another first episode, this time for seaQuest DSV, had the titular sub taking a direct from a torpedo. Afterwards, the first officer is talking about the repairs being made. Later a more extensive effort is shown tryign to root out a virus that's been screwing up their computer systems.
  • Firefly: In "Out of Gas", Serenity is crippled by an explosion which disabled their life support. In this case, the required repairs are implied to be simple enough, but they don't have the required part. Mal sends them off while he waits on the ship for someone to answer their distress call.

Video Games
  • Mass Effect:
    • Not really seen on screen, but there is mention that the Citadel had to have major repairs after Sovereign's attack. In Mass Effect 3 we see it more up close after Cerberus attacks.
    • In the intro to Mass Effect 2, one of the Normandy's crewmembers can be seen attempting to fight the fires with a fire extinguisher. The attack is so brutal and overwhelming, they are quickly forced to Abandon Ship.
  • Knights of the Old Republic II: The Sith Lords begins (optionally) with a badly damaged Ebon Hawk drifting through space. The action centers around T3-M4 as he tries to effect repairs and find a safe harbor to land at.
  • Aeon mission 3 in Supreme Commander involves spending the first third of the mission rebuilding a mostly-destroyed island base while finding off waves of UEF units trying to finish you, as the mission focuses on regaining the initiative in a stalled-out assault on a UEF core-world.
  • The first Starcraft includes this twice in the sixth Terran mission, where you have to rescue your former foe the Confederate General Duke from a Zerg assault. The player's abandoned main base must be captured and then repaired before the structures burn to ground, while Duke's ship is damaged and constantly under siege, requiring the player to work quickly to stabilize the situation.

Tabletop Games
  • The boardgame Red November is about a prototype submarine full of Gnomes on which various hazards make life difficult for the sailors, such as fires, leaks, doors getting stuck, various critical countdowns of the ship's system, oxygen running low, and on top of it all, a giant Kraken is lurking outside! The player's goal is to survive 60 minutes and use their time wisely to deal with the damage the sub is taking invariably. The whole game is obviously based on Hunt for Red October and the real-life Kursk disaster.

Real Life
  • Warships carry dedicated damage control teams to get it operational enough to at least reach a friendly port.
  • The USS Yorktown actually subverted it at the Battle of Midway. After being hit by Japanese bombs, the damage controls teams put out the fires and patched the holes so fast that when the second Japanese wave arrived, they thought it was a different ship and attacked again. She wasn't as lucky that time. In fact, the Japanese thought they had attacked three different ships, because each time they had damaged the Yorktown severely. The first time was at the Battle of the Coral Sea, which forced Yorktown to put into port at Pearl Harbor for repairs that were estimated to take at least a month to complete. Thanks to the hard work of the dedicated dockworkers, she was ready for battle in three days.
  • In the US Navy, all shipboard personnel are trained in basic damage control and fire fighting techniques, this is opposed to the Royal Navy's practice of dedicated specialists, which the US Navy used to use... until a major accident during the Vietnam War where the entire Damage Control team was wiped out in a secondary explosion during a flight deck fire.
Community Feedback Replies: 133
  • October 1, 2012
    Arivne

  • October 1, 2012
    Tallens
    • Frequently seen in various Star Trek episodes after the ship takes damage. Notable in Star Trek Voyager where they had to do many repairs themselves.

    Film:
    • Seen in U-571 as they try to get a damaged submarine under control before they get too deep.

    Video Games:
    • Base structures in Command And Conquer have a repair function to bring them back to full capacity after an attack.
    • In Star Craft and Star Craft II Terrans are able to repair structures and vehicles with SCVs.
    • Not really seen on screen, but there is mention that the Citadel in Mass Effect had to have major repairs after Sovereign's attack. In Mass Effect 3 we see it more up close after Cerberus attacks.

    Real Life
    • Warships carry dedicated damage control teams to get it operational enough to at least reach a friendly port.
    • The USS Yorktown actually subverted it at the Battle of Midway. After being hit by Japanese bombs, the damage controls teams put out the fires and patched the holes so fast that when the second Japanese wave arrived, they thought it was a different ship and attacked again. She wasn't as lucky that time.
  • October 1, 2012
    Tallens
    Also there's a work called Damage Control, as well as a few internal things. You might want to think of a different name.
  • October 1, 2012
    norsicnumber2nd
    The Avengers. They probably want to fix NYC.
  • October 1, 2012
    Damr1990
    On the Megaman Legends games, the Bonne Family ends up destroying the city where you fight them (altghout if you play correctly you can reduce the ammount of damage they do) and oftem you can donate money for the reparations, althoug not obligatory, by doing so, many of the destroyed locations can later opent side quest or minigames that give you parts for crafting new weapons
  • October 2, 2012
    AFP
    Damage Control could always get shifted into the Comic Book namespace. That said, I'm all for a better name if anyone can think of one. Send In The Repair Team?
  • October 2, 2012
    AFP
    I think this trope should specifically refer to situations where the repair work is either shown or discussed (i.e.: "We have fires on decks six through ten, hull breach in Engineering! Estimate five minutes until we can get the Black Box operational again!). Simply presenting the damage with the Fridge Logic implication that someone will have to fix it later wouldn't be a good fit here, I think.

    • Battle Star Galactica Reimagined had this on more than one occassion, as the Galactica often came under attack by the Cylons. The first episode had many of the damage control personnel get Thrown Out The Airlock when the Galactica officers were forced to vent the atmosphere form part of the ship in order to put the fires out before it was too late.
  • October 2, 2012
    Rotpar
    In FTL Faster Than Light, you assign crew to different stations to repair damage done by weapons fire or enemies boarding your ship.
  • October 2, 2012
    Tallens
    @AFP Either might work. Maybe we should ask a mod about it.

    • In the first episode of Last Resort the crew of the USS Colorado are shown repairing the sub after a missile attack.
    • Another first episode, this time for Sea Quest DSV, had the titular sub taking a direct from a torpedo. Afterwards, the first officer is talking about the repairs being made. Later a more extensive effort is shown tryign to root out a virus that's been screwing up their computer systems.

    Film:
    • Seen in quite a few Star Trek movies:
      • In Star Trek II The Wrath Of Khan, it's seen as the Reliant tears into the Enterprise, culminating in Spock's Heroic Sacrifice to repair the warp drive.
      • In Star Trek IV The Voyage Home when Kirk asks when they can get their captured Bird-of-Prey under way, Scotty quips, "Damage control is easy; reading Klingon, that's hard."
      • The space battle in Star Trek VI The Undiscovered Country has Scotty doing his usual thing while the Enterprise is pummeled by torpedoes.
      • Again, during the battle in Star Trek Generations, Geordi LaForge is seen ordering his repair teams around, although it ultimately turns out to be futile.
      • In Star Trek Insurrection the Enterprise gets into another space fight. It's not really seen, but right before it starts, LaForge leaves the bridge for Engineering, knowing what he's going to be doing in short order.

    Hmmm...does that spoiler need to be there? Is that a case of It Was His Sled?
  • October 2, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    "Also there's a work called Damage Control, as well as a few internal things."

    More importantly, the term these days often also refers to trying to get a positive spin on a bad PR situation.
  • October 4, 2012
    AFP
    The PR version of course is, in its own way, effectively the same thing, but for public relations rather than equipment or infrastructure. The name comes from this trope though. If we need a trope name for that, I'd call it "Spin Doctoring" or "Spin Control" which are other expressions I've heard for it.
  • October 4, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    "but for public relations rather than equipment or infrastructure"

    Yeah, that's why I wrote "also... a bad PR situation".
  • October 4, 2012
    AFP
    I thought you were saying that was an argument against using this title for this trope. Now I'm just confuzed.

    Which, granted, isn't a new state of mind for me or anything.
  • October 4, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ Actually I was. I was just noting that you seemed to be clarifying my post with the very thing I had written.
  • October 4, 2012
    zarpaulus
    There's an upgrade in the campaign of Starcraft II that allows buildings to automatically repair if damaged into the red and not outright destroyed. I believe it's even called "Damage Control".

    Web Comics
    • In Schlock Mercenary ships with fabbers are capable of repairing themselves, though no where near as quickly as a good shipyard can.
  • October 4, 2012
    AFP
    Well, I think this name is better fitting for this trope, since the PR version is a derivation of that use. Of course, if anyone can think of a better name for this trope, I'm all for that.

    We could also make the PR trope (I'd be surprise if it doesn't already exist, actually) and call it "Spin Control" or "PR Damage Control" or something. It's pretty clear to me that the only thing keeping this trope's head un-covered is the name issue one way or the other.
  • October 4, 2012
    Tallens
    Maybe we could call it Battle Repairs.
  • October 4, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ If this is the standard term, we can stick with this name. The PR form is the offshoot, so it should have an offshoot name.
  • October 4, 2012
    AFP
    A quick Wiki search has Damage Control being a term used by various services for emergency repairwork done on ships at sea. The alternate uses of the name in other contexts (including Public Relations) is mentioned there as well.
  • October 7, 2012
    AFP
    If we're good on the name, I'm putting a hat on it.
  • October 7, 2012
    Tallens
    Literature:
    • Seen in several Tom Clancy novels:
      • In The Hunt For Red October the sub takes damage in a fight with another sub and has to be repaired.
      • Red Storm Rising had a number of instances, notably the damaged USS Nimitz limping back into port after being struck by missiles, a soviet freighter carrying troops and equipment having to fight fires after being strafed by F-15s, the seawater used to put them out inadvertently ruining a lot of missiles that had planned to install in their new base. It isn't seen, but it's obvious that this is what's going on aboard the ill-fated USS Providence. Finally, the Soviets manage to take over a USAF base in Iceland, and when the Americans attack trying to render it useless, cratering the runways, the Soviets use the repair materials the Americans themselves had left in the event of such an occasion and have them back in use before nightfall.
  • October 7, 2012
    DracMonster
    I think Emergency Repairs might be the correct title, this appears to be having to do the work in the middle of a crisis situation. (Not necessarily combat.)

    Damage Control is heavily associated with spewing corporate or political spin
  • October 10, 2012
    AFP
    Either name works, in my opinion, though I would use "PR Damage Control" or "Spin Control" for the PR version .

    Obviously, I like my name better, but mainly I'm interested in finding out what it will take to make this trope launchable.
  • October 10, 2012
    lilliterra
  • October 11, 2012
    AFP
    I suppose that depends on how often you find yourself needing to conduct emergency repairs after a disaster or an attack. I certainly hope life isn't *quite* that interesting for most people.
  • October 11, 2012
    Tallens
    I think People Sit On Chairs is being thrown around a bit too much. It refers to things that are so commonplace as to be meaningless. Like walking on the ground, breathing air, or putting things on top of other things. Every instance that I can think of where Damage Control appears, it is a significant event, with possible plot (or life) altering potential.
  • October 11, 2012
    mew4ever23
    I agree, I think this is People Sit On Chairs. There was a fight, something got broken, it needs to be fixed. Commonplace.
  • October 11, 2012
    Tallens
    ^That is a very broad over-generalization. That could easily refer to a couple of girls having a catfight and breaking their mother's vase, rather than a battle occurring and a crew having to make repairs because their lives depend on it. Then you dismiss it as "commonplace."

    Tropes are common. That's part of what makes them tropes. People Sit On Chairs isn't about that, it even says in its description No Trope Is Too Common. It's about things that are meaningless, that do nothing to advance the story.
  • October 12, 2012
    Dawnwing
    I don't think this is PSOC. Tallens said it pretty well: it's got a point and significant meaning to the plot, it's not just "something broke let's fix it".

    Literature:
    • In the Warrior Cats series, a forest fire burns through ThunderClan's territory in the fourth book. In addition to killing several cats and driving out all the prey, the camp itself was destroyed. They have to try and rebuild it with whatever little they have left to work with, and try to get back to a normal lifestyle, before the other Clans take advantage of their vulnerability.
  • October 12, 2012
    Stratadrake
    Definitely going to need a better name here; in addition to having a work named after it, the phrase "damage control" is also frequently used metaphorically.
  • October 12, 2012
    AFP
    Well, as you mentioned, the work is named after the common expression, and the metaphors are used also because of the common expression. Sounds like it's a perfect name since we already see widespread use of the phrase to refer to this trope.
  • October 12, 2012
    AFP
    And yes, this isn't "There was a fight, something got broken, and it needs to be fixed", it's "There was an attack/major disaster/huge accident, and if we don't get the damage under control soon, this show is going to have a Downer Ending for all of us."
  • October 12, 2012
    Tallens
    A couple more TV examples:

    • Star Trek The Next Generation: The episode "Disaster" has the Enterprise adrift after being hit be a rare energy wave, and an inexperienced Counselor Troi in charge of managing repair efforts.

    • Firefly: In "Out of Gas", Serenity is crippled by an explosion which disabled their life support. They find themselves unable to make repairs because they don't have the right part, so Mal sends them off while he waits on the ship for someone to answer their distress call.
  • October 13, 2012
    Tallens
    Addendum to the Star Craft example: If Terran structures are in the red, they will continue to lose hit points until they explode, or are repaired.
  • October 15, 2012
    Arivne
    Damage Repair would avoid confusion with the "spin doctoring" definition of Damage Control.

    Video Games
    • Dune II. If your base structures are damaged you can repair them by spending a small number of credits proportional to the damage repaired.
  • October 20, 2012
    Tallens
    • In The Avengers, Iron Man and Captain America have to do repairs on the Airborne Aircraft Carrier at 30,000 feet after Hawkeye attacks and blows up one of its engines.

    • In the Star Trek Voyager episode "Deadlock", Voyager takes a severe beating from an unknown source. At the end of the episode, the entire crew is seen doing repairs.

    • Yorktown's sister, USS Enterprise, at the Battle of Santa Cruz was attacked by a wave of Japanese bombers and took hits to her steering system. She spent the next two hours going in circles while repairs were made, repairs that were possible, or at least made a lot faster, because their chief damage control officer had requisitioned twice his allotment of firefighting foam, and another one had made modifications to a breathing apparatus, doubling its capacity.
  • October 21, 2012
    Chabal2
    Some Tower Defense games have a mechanic that lets you repair your base in between waves.
  • October 21, 2012
    Tallens
    ^ Examples?
  • October 23, 2012
    Arivne
    ^

    Video Games
    • In XGen Studio's Web Game Defend Your Castle, you can spend money to repair your castle.
  • October 23, 2012
    Chernoskill
    Tabletop Games
    • The boardgame Red November is about a prototype submarine full of Gnomes on which various hazards make life difficult for the sailors, such as fires, leaks, doors getting stuck, various critical countdowns of the ship's system, oxygen running low, and on top of it all, a giant Kraken is lurking outside! The player's goal is to survive 60 minutes and use their time wisely to deal with the damage the sub is taking invariably. The whole game is obviously based on Hunt for Red October and the real-life Kursk disaster.
  • November 6, 2012
    Tallens
    Bump.
  • November 6, 2012
    Stratadrake
    I think where Video Game examples are concerned it should only count as an example if "rebuild and repair" is explicitly a mission objective. Otherwise, simply saying "you can choose to repair damage" is tantamount to "you can heal your RPG party between Random Encounters" -- Not A Trope. It lacks the narrative and dramatic trappings of the definition (compare Train Wreck Episode).
  • November 25, 2012
    Tallens
    We seem to have lost steam on this.
  • November 25, 2012
    Stratadrake
    Doffing a hat. Working title is bad (established term for "spin doctoring"), Video Game examples must be plot/mission relevant, not just "you have the ability to repair damage".
  • November 26, 2012
    TrollBrutal
    I associated the term with naval overhauls first but nowadays is more a plumber / PR word, what about After Action Repair ?

  • November 26, 2012
    Stratadrake
    Still needs to be plot-relevant to qualify. (This is almost always the case outside interactive media; videogames need special attention to this though.)
  • November 27, 2012
    Tallens
    ^Anyone else care to weigh in? Yea, nay?
  • December 6, 2012
    AFP
    I still feel the need to argue against the spin doctoring term because the phrase originally referred to this Trope.
  • December 6, 2012
    Tallens
    ^I think you're fighting a losing battle with that.
  • December 7, 2012
    AFP
    Sigh, it's so stressfull being the Only Sane Man :-D

    After Action Repair or Emergency Repairs could work too if the consensus is that "Damage Control" isn't a good title. I do recall that the rule of thumb was that if a phrase is used in Real Life to describe a trope, then that is the best title for the trope (this came up in the discussion when I was pitching Nose Art).
  • December 7, 2012
    Stratadrake
    I think this needs a title like Damage Control Episode to reflect that it's the focus of an episode or story element, not just an "oh maybe we should repair this".
  • December 7, 2012
    justanid
  • December 7, 2012
    Tallens
    I think Emergency Repairs is the best fit. It tells us that they're not just repairs, they're urgently needed repairs, as is right now.

    By the way, why were those video game examples removed? I don't recall anyone agreeing to that.
  • December 7, 2012
    StarSword
    The Mass Effect 2 example is hardly a spoiler. It happens in the first five minutes of the game and was, IIRC, revealed in the advertising.
  • December 7, 2012
    Stratadrake
    ^^ See my comment about a dozen posts up. From a gameplay standpoint repairs = healing, so the fact that you "can" make repairs after an attack wave is Chairs.
  • December 7, 2012
    Tallens
    And my point is that so far you're the only one to have issues with that. I happen to disagree. It's a game mechanic, true, but we have a whole list of tropes for those.

    Exhibit 'A': Scoring Points. If that's not what you're complaining about, I don't know what is, but there it is.

    And this while thing about healing being PSOC, how do you conclude that? What does healing mean? It means that after a fight and being injured (or taking damage) you are brought back to full capacity are are then able to continue the story.
  • December 8, 2012
    Stratadrake
    This is not a trope about Video Game gameplay mechanics. When other media use it for plot reasons, videogames must follow suit.
  • December 8, 2012
    Tallens
    Must? I've been going through the guidelines and haven't found anything that says they must as you say. Tropes Are Flexible, after all. If you've found one that does say that, I'd like to see it, otherwise it's still just your opinion.
  • December 10, 2012
    Stratadrake
    There is a reason I invoked Chairs with regards to videogames: It's commonly just healing by a different name (sometimes by a different medic), the priority of which is left to the player's discretion; whether or not a given repair to base structures qualifies as "urgent" or "emergency" in actual gameplay is completely YMMV.
  • December 10, 2012
    Tallens
    Again, where was it decided that healing was chairs?
  • December 10, 2012
    Stratadrake
    Okay, I guess it's not an entirely correct use of chairs. But its use as a healing spell is not the same trope as this one.
  • December 15, 2012
    Tallens
    Since we're comparing this to healing, why don't we take a look at it. The video game examples are all pretty much used the same way as the examples we had here. Healing Potion is the same way.
  • December 15, 2012
    Stratadrake
    Healing Hands and Healing Potion are both specific kinds of healing (skill, item). I also checked the videogames section on each and noticed that the former lists primarily RPG's while the latter includes a variety of genres.
  • December 15, 2012
    Tallens
    The point was that you didn't think that something used as a plot device should be used as a game mechanic as well. Both of those tropes are used as plot devices and game mechanics. Sometimes both. The kind of healing and the genre of the game are both irrelevant.
  • December 15, 2012
    Tallens
    In any case, we seem to have scared off everyone else. We've got 10 straight entries of just the two of us going back and forth.
  • December 16, 2012
    StarSword
    Video Games:

    And it's not chairs. That's something that people just do and doesn't add anything to the story.
  • December 23, 2012
    AFP
    I'm thinking this should be about having to effect repairs as being a plot point, seperate from game mechanics concerning the same. In a medical story, you could sorta make this trope fit by having it be about "Meatball surgury", the quick and dirty temporary fixes to keep someone alive long enough to move on to the next patient, rather than the more time consuming and more complete methods you may not have time for, but I think that's a separate trope.
  • December 24, 2012
    HawkofBattle
    • Stargate SG 1 and Stargate Atlantis had to do this quite a lot, as the gate room tended to get shot up or blown apart on a fairly regular basis, not to mention all the other times the entire base would get overrun with fast growing plants, Replicators and techno virus' that could all eat metal and concrete. Atlantis tended to get flooded, bombed and had the entire control spire blown up on a couple of occasions.

    And then there were their starships, that seemingly couldn't go a single fight without needing repairs.
  • December 24, 2012
    StarSword
    Film:
  • December 24, 2012
    randomsurfer
    See also Cleanup Crew.
  • December 24, 2012
    Stratadrake
    ^ Which, going by its definition, should really be called Coverup Crew.
  • December 24, 2012
    jatay3
    In Berlin a surprising amount of buildings are designed according to the most modern fashions-simply because the earlier ones were subject to intense bombing during World War II.
  • December 24, 2012
    Stratadrake
    ^ ...and?
  • December 24, 2012
    Tallens
    ^^^Something to be brought up in the Trope Repair Shop.

  • December 26, 2012
    AFP
    Regarding the buildings in Berlin, that's not really this trope at all. Having to do rushed repairs to get a damaged factory running again, or to keep an apartment building from collapsing due to its damage, would be.
  • December 26, 2012
    Tallens
    • Star Wars:
      • The Phantom Menace: After Trade Federation battleships shoot out the shield generators on the royal cruiser, R2-D2 and several other astromechs are called out to fix it. R2 gets it done but all the other droids are blown away in the process.
      • The Empire Strikes Back: Han and Chewbacca are shown trying to get a malfunctioning hyperdrive online while being pounded by Imperial Star Destroyers.

    Video game
    • Knights Of The Old Republic II: The Sith Lords begins (optionally) with a badly damaged Ebon Hawk drifting through space. The action centers around T3-M4 as he tries to effect repairs and find a safe harbor to land at.
  • December 28, 2012
    AFP
    The Great Repair seems to have some overlap.
  • December 28, 2012
    Stratadrake
    ...and its own not-particularly-good name....
  • January 3, 2013
    Tallens
    We've got two entries for Star Trek II. They ought to be merged.
  • January 4, 2013
    Tallens
    Wasn't there an episode of The Simpsons where Homer had to single-handedly repair the town's nuclear reactor to avert an imminent meltdown?
  • January 4, 2013
    StarSword
    TV:
    • The Stargate Verse did this a few times once Earth acquired a space fleet.
      • Stargate SG 1: In "Flesh and Blood" the Odyssey's crew spent the first part of the episode patching her up after she was disabled during the Curb Stomp Battle that began the Ori invasion in the previous episode. "Company of Thieves" did it with the Odyssey again after she was badly damaged in a Lucian Alliance ambush.
      • Stargate Universe spends the first couple of episodes just trying to get Destiny's life support working properly after the ship had been left unmaintained for millions of years.
  • January 4, 2013
    Stratadrake
    ^ Second one sounds more like The Great Repair.
  • January 4, 2013
    StarSword
    Yeah, you're probably right.
  • January 4, 2013
    Tallens
    Who put the Tropeworthy tag up there? I thought we'd already established that.
  • January 5, 2013
    Stratadrake
    Did we?

    Wasn't me, but simply "these guys exist in the setting" isn't necessarily a trope.
  • January 19, 2013
    Tallens
    • In Last Exile the Silvana gets into a fight with three other airships and appears to have been destroyed. It wasn't but it took significant repairs just to get her airborne again, even then most of the damage couldn't be dealt with until they put into port.
  • January 19, 2013
    Stratadrake
    ^ Sounds like The Great Repair.
  • January 19, 2013
    Tallens
    They're not necessarily mutually exclusive.

    Besides, The Great Repair is more about keeping your only means of escape/survival operational. That was not the case here, as there was a means to evacuate should they have need to Abandon Ship.

    In any case, a compare/contrast to The Great Repair probably ought to be added to the description.
  • February 6, 2013
    Tallens
    Does anyone care about this anymore?
  • February 6, 2013
    StarSword
    I do, but the sponsor seems to have disappeared.
  • February 6, 2013
    Tallens
    Are you going to take it over then?
  • February 6, 2013
    StarSword
    I'll PM him for permission since it's not Up For Grabs yet.
  • February 6, 2013
    AFP
    I'm still around. I think the last big hanging point was figuring out what to call it:
    • I'm in favor of "Damage Control" because that's what it's called in Real Life.
    • There's a work with that name (borrowing from the Real Life term), but that can be fixed by moving it into the proper namespace to free up the "Main" namespace.
    • There's also a Public Relations term called "Damage Control", but that also borrows its name from the Real Life name for this term, so if a trope for that is needed, it would make more sense for that one to have a different name.
  • February 6, 2013
    AFP
    Not to mentiong figuring out how exactly this compares/contrasts with The Great Repair.
  • February 6, 2013
    StarSword
    The Great Repair seems to be use of a damaged vehicle or location as a Closed Circle to trap everyone aboard for the episode/series/etc. This is repairs of damage in flight. I think this is a case of "may overlap with" rather than "compare/contrast".

    As an aside, seems to me the source of the confusion is Trope Namer Syndrome: The Great Repair is named after The Great Escape for some bizarre reason.
  • February 6, 2013
    StarSword
    As for the conflicting comic book series, I'm moving it to the right namespace as we speak.

    EDIT: Got all the wicks except the one on Medium Awareness, which somebody is editing. I'll try again later. EDIT 2: Finished.
  • February 6, 2013
    randomsurfer
    [oops, didn't notice it's already listed.]
  • February 8, 2013
    Tallens
    • The Argo II in The Mark of Athena takes frequent damage through the course of the book, but since they are attacked almost every time they set down they have to do a lot of repairs on the fly, in one case their means of escape does almost as much damage as the attack, meaning Leo has to do some fast work just to keep the ship from flying apart. Another time after being attacked by a sea monster Leo got washed overboard so the others, under Annabeth's direction, had to do enough repairs to keep them from sinking.
  • February 9, 2013
    PolarBears
    • Another submarine example which predates U-571: Das Boot. The sub is damaged and the crew desperately tries to fix it as it sinks and even after the sub reaches the ocean floor.

    • I am pretty sure there is a repair plot in one of the Horatio Hornblower movies...
  • April 2, 2013
    StarSword
    Is this gonna move?
  • April 2, 2013
    Tallens
    I dunno. We've got the examples plus a few not added, so I think we still had conflict about what to call this.
  • April 3, 2013
    StarSword
    Well, there's no longer a conflict with Damage Control: I moved that to the right namespace over a month ago, and the Main redirect can be repurposed as the trope page as long as we add a disambig to the description.

    We could do an alt titles crowner, but unfortunately crowners are currently disabled due to the site being under DDOS attack (revenge for the porn purge from what I've heard). I worked out an alternate method, but it requires a forum thread and a Google account or similar (for the web document) and for somebody to actively track the thread and update the votes.
  • April 14, 2013
    Tallens
    I've seen a couple of recent crowners, has that situation been resolved?
  • April 15, 2013
    StarSword
    It has, yes.
  • April 15, 2013
    Chernoskill
    An early videogame example is the classic game Rampage, with each player having to build a castle from LEGO-like blocks, setting up cannons, and shooting at their enemy bases. Then comes a short rebuilding phase where you try to replace destroyed wall sections, and then you shoot some more.
  • April 15, 2013
    StarSword
    ^I think they really only want video game story examples, not game mechanic examples.
  • April 15, 2013
    Chernoskill
    ^I see :)

    Edit: Although in this case, I wonder why the Red Novemer TTG example was added :?
  • April 15, 2013
    MokonaZero
    In Starcraft the terrans have to repair burning buildings or else the fire will slowly destroy them.
  • April 15, 2013
    StarSword
    ^Game mechanic example.
  • April 16, 2013
    Arivne
    If this is launched as Damage Control, be sure to remove the redirect that sends that name to the Comic Book series page.
  • April 17, 2013
    Tallens
    • Several times in the Command And Conquer series you would be put down in a damaged base, sometimes first having to locate it, then bring it up to speed before Nod attacked. One mission in Command And Conquer Tiberium Wars had you do this and Hold The Line against Nod forces until reinforcements arrive, while Kane taunts you.
  • April 26, 2013
    Tallens
    A few possibilities for a page quote, all from Scotty

    The shape the thing's in it's hard to keep it from blowin'.

    This jury-rigging won't last for long...

    Hold together little darling, hold together.
  • April 27, 2013
    randomsurfer
    In the first episode of The Simpsons 2007-08 season (after The Simpsons Movie) during the Couch Gag we see Bart skateboarding around Springfield as it's being rebuilt after the events of the film.
  • April 27, 2013
    StarSword
    @Arivne: This would replace the redirect completely, like No Such Agency did with a redirect to NSA.
  • April 27, 2013
    KZN02
  • May 2, 2013
    Tallens
    Come on, let's get this thing out the door!
  • May 16, 2013
    Tallens
    Bump.
  • May 16, 2013
    Bobchillingworth
    Aeon mission 3 in Supreme Commander involves spending the first third of the mission rebuilding a mostly-destroyed island base while finding off waves of UEF units trying to finish you.
  • May 18, 2013
    Tallens
    • The Star Trek II scene is mirrored in Star Trek Into Darkness, but this time the roles are reversed. Spock is commanding the battle and Kirk is the one who does the Heroic Sacrifice to repair the ship before it crashes or burns up in Earth's atmosphere.
  • May 26, 2013
    AFP
    Updated the tropes listing. The old video game examples (the mechanic-based rather than plot-based) are still in there, but commented out. I think they should be removed except for specific examples of missions where the plot specifically depends on conducting repairs.
  • May 27, 2013
    kjnoren
    Not sure if Damage Control is the best trope name, since even the original term encompasses much more than repairs or fire-fighting. Some of the actions taken during damage control can be:

    • flooding magazines in order to prevent a fire from reaching explosives
    • closing watertight doors to prevent flooding of undamaged sections of the ship
    • deliberate flooding of sections to stop the ship from capsizing
    • running the ship aground to stop it from sinking

    I think breaking into closed-off compartments to rescue hurt or trapped sailors is also included. Ie, damage control can in many cases mean causing deliberate damage to the ship.
  • May 27, 2013
    Tallens
    From Star Trek: TNG
    • The incident in "Disaster" was part of the reason Troi decided to take the Bridge Officer Test, which tested, among other things, her ability to manage damage control situations, a part she had considerable trouble with. She eventually passed when she realized that the real test was whether or not she was willing to do whatever it took to ensure the safety of the ship, up to and including ordering someone to his death.
  • June 4, 2013
    Tallens
    What's the hold up now?
  • June 16, 2013
    Tallens
    Bump
  • June 16, 2013
    TwoGunAngel
    So...is this ready to launch, or are people still undecided on what to call this trope?
  • June 18, 2013
    Tallens
    I'm not sure. That's why I was asking what the hold up was.
  • June 18, 2013
    StarSword
    I don't know what the problem is. We've got five hats, the title's a preexisting term (though I call Redirects Are Free on some of the better alt titles), and the conflicting work page has been kicked into the right namespace. I say launch.
  • June 18, 2013
    Tallens
    Agreed. This has been drawn out long enough.
  • June 25, 2013
    Tallens
    AFP, are you out there?
  • July 20, 2013
    Tallens
  • July 20, 2013
    StarSword
    I think this is Up For Grabs by now.
  • July 21, 2013
    Arivne
    The OP AFP's last post was on May 26th, so it becomes officially Up For Grabs on July 26th.
  • July 21, 2013
    DAN004
    Launch plz?
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=u2t3yxez0bnrr14m9nk7ukgh