Created By: JonnyB on July 19, 2010 Last Edited By: JonnyB on November 19, 2010
Troped

Army Of Lawyers

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
HUT two three four!
Do We Have This One?? Seen It a Million Times...

These are mooks in suits, used for intimidation. When a character in a story feels he's been wronged (or feels he can get the upper hand), especially if said character is rich, he'll often threaten to call upon his Army of Lawyers. (Sometimes, "my legal team", same diff. In other words, lawyer overkill.) Sometimes that Army can actually be seen in a show, and when they are, they are invariably marching in ranks behind the character, in step and double-file (and often with an added foley effect of marching jackboots). Occasionally it will be a team of Yes Men or Middle Management Mooks rather than lawyers, but with the same effect: a martial show of force in a corporate or legal setting. Sometimes the Army will be acting on behalf of an unseen (usually evil) client, all members of the Army working toward one ominous goal.


Examples:

Film

Literature

Live-Action TV
  • The law firm of Wolfram and Hart from Angel.
  • One episode of The Defenders (the 2010 series with lawyers) has one episode's bad guys use their Army of Lawyers as a blatant show of force. There are so many of them that when they sit down at their ridiculously long table they need two row of chairs.

Video Games
  • In Call To Power and its sequel, once you develop to the Modern Era, you can train Lawyers and Corporate Branches to wage economic warfare on your enemies. Ordinary army-units are mostly helpless against them, too - only Lawyers can fight Lawyers. And they're really, really effective. This means that unless it ends before you develop that far, a multiplayer match will inevitably devolve into an earth-shattering confrontation between two competing armies of briefcase-wielding, suit-wearing lawyers (and corporate branches).

Web Comics

Western Animation
  • C. Montgomery Burns has a team of lawyers but usually only the Blue Haired Lawyer talks.
  • Another episode of The Simpsons ("The Joy of the Sect") had the Movementarians call out their lawyers (in the style of some firemen) when they've realised that Marge managed to break her family out.

Real Life
Community Feedback Replies: 27
  • June 13, 2010
    JonnyB
    Found a few news items on the web that referred to this:

    Those are just a few; Googling this phrase shows a plethora of similar ones.
  • June 13, 2010
    randomsurfer
    C. Montgomery Burns has a team of lawyers but usually only the Blue Haired Lawyer talks.
  • June 14, 2010
    Chabal2
    Thief's Ninja Lawyers in Eight Bit Theater.
  • June 14, 2010
    DaibhidC
    There's an Army of Lawyers surrounding the Lavish family in Making Money, although they're mostly there to threaten other Lavishes.
  • June 14, 2010
    Bisected8
    Another episode of The Simpsons ("The Joy of the Sect") had the Movementarians call out their lawyers (in the style of some firemen) when they've realised that Marge managed to break her family out.
  • June 14, 2010
    Game_Fan
    The Partnership Collective from Schlock Mercenary.
  • June 15, 2010
    JonnyB
    I'm thinking Wolfram and Hart from Buffy The Vampire Slayer might fall into this category...
  • June 19, 2010
    Starry-Eyed
    Both the plaintiff and the big tobacco company have one of these in John Grisham's The Runaway Jury
  • June 19, 2010
    Quatic
    Scientology in real life.
  • July 3, 2010
    JonnyB
    bump
  • July 19, 2010
    DaibhidC
    Another Discworld example: the Elf Queen summons an Army of Lawyers in The Wee Free Men; the one thing the Nac Mac Feegle are scared of.
  • November 6, 2010
    JonnyB
    A recent radio commercial prior to the 2010 November elections in California warned voters that Proposition 25 was being fought by politicians and their "briefcase army" (with appropriate marching sound effects in the background).
  • November 6, 2010
    JonnyB
    In National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, Clark's boss is introduced with a team of yes-men marching lockstep behind him.
  • November 6, 2010
    SeanMurrayI
    ^Those aren't lawyers. And knowing that Christmas Vacation is where the picture comes from, those aren't lawyers, either.
  • November 6, 2010
    JonnyB
    I didn't say they were lawyers. I said they were yes-men. And I modified the description to include yes-men, lobbyists or any other group of suited mooks marching lockstep.
  • November 6, 2010
    SeanMurrayI
    Then I'd modify the title as well. Lawyers, yes-men, and lobbyists are three entirely different things and are far from interchangeable terms. Mooks In Suits, perhaps?

    Yes-Men could also probably be its own separate trope.
  • November 6, 2010
    JonnyB
    Yes Man is a separate trope.

    This sort of martial intimidation in the corporate world is usually known colloquially as an army of lawyers, whether it's actual lawyers or not. But I'll make some redirects with alternative titles if there's confusion.
  • November 6, 2010
    SeanMurrayI
    Technically "martial intimidation in the corporate world" is referred to the actions of an "army of lawyers" because the intimidated party is usually being threatened with legal action, which would require lawyers. I've never heard the term "army of lawyers" refer to yes men or lobbyists or anyone other than lawyers.
  • November 7, 2010
    JonnyB
    Perhaps two tropes here, Marching Mooks in Suits and Army of Lawyers as a subtrope.
  • November 8, 2010
    Koveras
    It's mentioned many times in The Dresden Files, that Gentleman Johny Marcone has an Army Of Lawyers to protect him from any kind of legal charges.
  • November 8, 2010
    LarryD
    I have to mention the Nazgul of Armonk. This proposed trope raised to eleven.
  • November 18, 2010
    Game_Fan
    One episode of The Defenders (the 2010 series with lawyers) has one episode's bad guys use their Army Of Lawyers as a blatant show of force. There are so many of them that when they sit down at their ridiculously long table they need two row of chairs.
  • November 18, 2010
    brogaglas
    I hate to do it, but...

    In Family Guy, Peter tried to sue Mc Burgertown following his burger eating binge, massive stroke, and unrealistically fast recovery. Peter, seemingly without representation, tries to bribe the judge with a magazine subscription. Mc Burgertown fielded exactly 100 lawyers. Peter lost.
  • November 18, 2010
    ccoa
  • November 18, 2010
    Jordan
    Would the two lawyers in Order Of The Stick count? I know these examples often have several lawyers, but they kind of fit in behavior. They come from beyond the fourth wall and have on two occasions taken out a villain by virtue of them being a copyrighted character/Overused Copycat Character.
  • November 19, 2010
    randomsurfer
    Correction: Wolfram & Hart is from Angel, not Buffy.
  • November 19, 2010
    BlackDragon
    In Call To Power and its sequel, once you develop to the Modern Era, you can train Lawyers and Corporate Branches to wage economic warfare on your enemies. Ordinary army-units are mostly helpless against them, too - only Lawyers can fight Lawyers. And they're really, really effective. This means that unless it ends before you develop that far, a multiplayer match will inevitably devolve into an earth-shattering confrontation between two competing armies of briefcase-wielding, suit-wearing lawyers (and corporate branches).
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=ts0v0qz1rimo2ha7qpqbnalh