Guile Hero


(permanent link) added: 2009-09-26 07:38:40 sponsor: Tokuiten (last reply: 2009-09-26 07:38:40)

Add Tag:
Will launch by end of Friday unless there are serious objections.

Completing a triangle with the Action Hero and the Science Hero, the Guile Hero is a hero who operates by playing politics and manipulating the bad guys. The Guile Hero trades swords and guns (or science and technology) for charm, wit, political and/or financial acumen, and an in-depth knowledge of human nature. The Batman Gambit, the Xanatos Gambit, and even the Xanatos Roulette are at the Maniuplation Hero's fingertips. Often, a Guile Hero will manipulate the other good guys and a whole bunch of innocent bystanders as part of their scheme to bring down the Big Bad, though they'll take care to ensure the other characters aren't truly harmed in the process. The Guile Hero is likely to be a politician or a businessman.

The Guile Hero may be considered a heroic analogue to the Magnificent Bastard; unlike the Magnificent Bastard, the Guile Hero is unambiguously a good guy with the same goals as any Action Hero or Science Hero. While some other heroes may be unhappy with being manipulated by the Guile Hero, it is made clear to the reader that this character both has a heroic goal and is not Jumping Off the Slippery Slope into becoming a Well-Intentioned Extremist.

The Guile Hero combines elements of The Chessmaster and The Strategist while being neither. A Guile Hero isn't neccessarily The Chessmaster: the Guile Hero is simply a hero who uses wit, charm, and skill to mislead and set up the bad guys, while The Chessmaster is often devoted to grander schemes, and is always at the top of the food chain. For example, The Chessmaster is likely to be The Man Behind the Man of both The Empire and La Résistance; the Guile Hero is likely a member or supporter of La Résistance plotting to destroy the morale of The Empire's soldiers by creating a financial crisis to render them underpaid and undersupplied.


Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • Rock in Black Lagoon.
  • The main character (Ayumu Narumi) from Spiral fits this pretty well.
  • Kisuke Urahara in Bleach combines this with Action Hero. He can kick ass when he needs to, but he prefers to use the protagonists to act as his surrogates in his conflict with Sosuke Aizen.
  • Lawrence, the main character of the anime Spice and Wolf is the economic type. When Horo is kidnapped by an evil corporation, he uses economic wizardry and manipulation to arrange for her release. Which pisses her off to no end since she'd hoped to see him rescue her personally, all Prince Charming style. Every once in a while, he manages to get himself into deep enough trouble that Horo has to bail him out by Deus ex Machina, but he's still quite the savvy trader...

Comic Books

Film
  • Harvey Milk in his biopic, Milk

Literature

Live-Action TV
  • Matt Parkman from Heroes. Subliminal mind-control (or something like that) is his super power.
  • Mr. Chapel, Vengeance Unlimited. His gambits use the services of previous clients.
  • From Leverage, Leverage Consulting and Associates as a group, and Nate Ford as a character.
  • Ed Deline, from Las Vegas.
  • Michael Weston in Burn Notice.
  • The scale of his manipulation is not as grand as some others listed here, but Aloysius Pendergast from the Preston/Child novels never hesitates to blackmail anyone into doing his bidding. For the greater good, of course.

Video Games

replies: 40

TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy