All Women Are Prudes


(permanent link) added: 2010-02-26 23:37:16 sponsor: callsignecho (last reply: 2010-02-26 23:37:16)

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Hijacked! Formerly "Women don't have a sex drive"

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Lie back and think of it.

You know what really grinds my gears? This Lindsay Lohan. Lindsay Lohan with all those little outfits, jumping around there on stage, half-naked with your little outfits. Ya know? You're a... You're out there jumping around and I'm just sitting here with my beer. So, what am I supposed to do? What you want? You know, are we gonna go out? Is that what you're trying to - why why are you leaping around there, throwing those things all up in my, over there in my face? What do you want, Lindsay? Tell me what you want? Well, I'll tell you what you want, you want nothing. You want nothing. All right? Because we all know that no woman anywhere wants to have sex with anyone, and to titillate us with any thoughts otherwise is - is just bogus.

Peter Griffin, Family Guy


In fiction land, sex is something women just give to men to shut them up for a while. Women don't enjoy sex, they don't desire it. If a woman is shown to enjoy sex, it means she's an, ahem, easy pick. It's sometimes implied that a desireable woman shouldn't want sex (see My Girl Is Not a Slut).

The corollary to this trope is that men are not prudes: see I'm a Man, I Can't Help It, A Man Is Not a Virgin, Chivalrous Pervert, and the er...Staff Counterpart--All Men Are Perverts.

However, men as a group do have a modicum of logic, because for every occurance of this trope there exists the parody or subversion of it somewhere else (even in the same story).

Aversions are very common as well; just check out My Girl Is a Slut, Good Bad Girl, Naughty Nuns, Night Nurse. Also the fact that the original Lysistrata Gambit was such an Epic Fail tells us this trope is Newer Than They Think.

Examples:

Film
  • The subject of a hilarious joke in the movie Annie Hall, where Woody Allen and Diane Keaton are both shown talking to their therapists. Woody complains that they almost never have sex: "Only three or four times a week." Annie complains that they constantly have sex, "Three or four times a week."
  • Sets off the plot of the film Extract, though the marriage depicted there has more problems than incompatible sex drives.
  • Played with in, of all things, MST3K Z-list fodder Hobgoblins with the hero's girlfriend, seemingly a living example of this trope until the wish-granting beasties of the title reveal that his girl is an aspiring slut..

Live Action Tv
  • Lampshaded in an episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer in which Xander says that everything makes 15-year-old boys think of sex when asked by his then-girlfriend. Interestingly, Buffy subverted this trope with vigor.
  • Used as the plot of an episode of Rules of Engagement, in which the male leads all bet on which of them -- the married man, the guy with a live-in girlfriend, and the single guy -- can score within 24 hours. Both the married guy and the single guy run into this trope.
  • This was a big part of what broke up J.D. and one of his girlfriends in a season of Scrubs; he wanted sex, she wanted to wait seemingly indefinitely.
    • Also, Dr. Kelso uses everyone's belief in this trope as part of a ruse involving the one night of the year his wife lets him seep with her. His wife has nothing to do with it.
  • Used in an episode of Two and a Half Men, "Kinda Like Necrophilia," with a gorgeous woman who is...less than enthusiastic in bed. Also less than animate.
  • Frequently used on the American version of Men Behaving Badly to drive various plotlines.
  • Kind of lampshaded in Frasier's famous line, "How can men possibly use sex to get what we want? Sex is what we want!" ...Apparently implying that it isn't what women want.
  • Inverted in Chester 5000 XYV. Priscilla certainly has a sex drive, and her husband builds her a robot because he can't keep up with her.
  • Averted in the BBC show Chef! where Janice is very interested in sex and the fact that Gareth is usually too tired is a sore point in their marriage.
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