Created By: TTurtle on March 29, 2011 Last Edited By: TTurtle on April 13, 2011
Troped

Spirited Young Lady

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There's a certain kind of character commonly found in historical fiction set in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (though she can appear earlier or later, too). Her literary ancestress can be found in some of the best-loved novels of the Regency and Victorian eras. She's the girl who bends the rules just a little. Oh, she can dance a country dance or pour tea with the best of them, but she may also be a good walker or horseback rider. She may be the most intelligent girl in the story, and she's almost certainly the wittiest and the most outspoken, sometimes earning her the title of spitfire. She may be talented in more practical ways, as well: if given the opportunity, she may turn out to be a wise investor, and she may harbor talent for music, writing or art may that goes beyond drawing room entertainment and becomes a means of financial independence, if necessary. In rare cases, she may even solve a murder. She may run into some trouble, especially if she fails to obey the powers that be, but she usually comes through in the end . . . and will likely attract the hero as well.

The Spirited Young Lady may have the same grace and style as the Proper Lady, but she's got an added spark of attitude or rebellion that's missing from her more-prim-and-proper literary cousin. This is what makes her such a popular character today: she's the character modern audiences can most admire or relate to. In historical fiction, she's likely to be a proto-feminist. In nineteenth-century literature, she may not speak out for women's rights generally (a few examples do), but she will speak out for her rights pretty clearly. Her willingness to say what she wants is part of what makes her stand out. In unskillful hands, such a character may seem anachronistic, or may become a Sue, though there are many examples that are both believable and well-rounded.

To sum up, here are the defining traits of a Spirited Young Lady:

  • She is a young woman, usually between 16-25.
  • Her social standing/family background will be middle class or higher. Most often, her family comes from the landed gentry, though she may be a clergyman's daughter.
  • She is witty and confident in her conversation.
  • She is often quite intelligent, and may display other talents.
  • She is independent and self-sufficient.
  • She is generally honest and frank (though she may lie for a good cause).
  • She may be outspoken, bold, or in some cases even defiant.
  • Despite the above, she generally avoids going so far beyond the rules of her society that she would be labelled disreputable: she is, after all, a lady.
  • Though the Spirited Young Lady is usually a heroine or positive supporting character, negative versions of this trope are possible. Only add such examples if is clear that they are treated as spirited young ladies in universe. If you're adding a villain or anti-hero as an example, please explain how she fits this trope rather than being just a period version of another trope.

The Proper Lady and the Spirited Young Lady are frequently paired together. If the Spirited Young Lady is the heroine, the Proper Lady may be her rival. In such cases the Spirited Young Lady may serve to deconstruct the Proper Lady. On the other hand, if the Proper Lady is the heroine, the Spirited Young Lady may serve as a bad example that the Proper Lady must reject. However, the two tropes have been known to coexist quite happily together as siblings or friends, in which case their differing character traits complement each other.

Compare Rebellious Princess, who's of a higher social standing but may behave similarly. The Spirited Young Lady may also be a Plucky Girl, but that isn't necessary to this trope. See also Yamato Nadeshiko, which can serve as the Japanese counterpart to either this trope or the Proper Lady.

Examples

Film

Literature
  • Elizabeth Bennet of Pride and Prejudice exemplifies this trope. She's smart, loyal to her friends, athletic, and witty. She knows the rules of her society quite well, and is distinguished by her good manners, but she isn't afraid to say what she thinks, even to Lady Catherine. Her sister Jane is her Proper Lady counterpart.
    • Mary Crawford from Mansfield Park definitely fits the trope, even though her lack of a moral compass ultimately keeps her from being admirable.
  • The titular character of Jane Eyre is this in spades. She sometimes appears to be meek and mild, but don't be fooled. She knows exactly what she wants and she is willing to go through considerable hardship to get it. She also gets a rousing "women have the same needs men do" speech early in the novel.
  • Many of Georgette Heyer's heroines count as this. One example would be Frederica, who at 24 is running her younger brother's estate and bringing up her younger siblings.
  • Margaret Hale of North and South is a strong, determined woman who will put herself in the way of angry mob in order to protect someone in need. (Later events suggest that she's pretty good at business, too.)
  • Scarlett O'Hara of Gone with the Wind displays the strength of character and drive for success associated with this trope. She also knows how to act the part of a lady, although her manipulation and bitchiness may suggest that she doesn't deserve that title. Melanie plays the Proper Lady counterpoint to Scarlett.
  • Isobel Archer in Henry James' Portrait of a Lady.
  • Among the March sisters in Little Women, Jo is one who best fits this trope, given her outspoken nature and her intellectual gifts. (Meg plays the Proper Lady in contrast.)
  • In Black Beauty, the Lady Anne is a Spirited Young Lady, going by what little we see of her.
  • Valeria Brinton of Wilkie Collins' The Law and the Lady is ladylike, graceful, and devoted to her husband. She also becomes one of the first amateur female detectives in the nineteenth-century novel.
  • Definitely Alexia Tarobotti from The Parasol Protectorate series. She is a lady of high intellect and wit, who wears the appropriate clothing, and follows Edwardian manners to a T (except when it pleases her to break them for the purpose of moving things along because everyone else is being annoying and incompetent). In-universe, her 'spirit' is humorously attributed by her fellow Englishmen to her half-Italian blood, and her blunt and unsympathetic manner to her Soullessness. It Makes Sense in Context.
  • Ada Lovelace from Robert Rankin's The Japanese Devil Fish Girl.

Theater
  • Cecily Cardew from The Importance of Being Earnest. Her spirit and wit are vividly showcased in the tea scene, which quickly becomes a snark-off between her and Gwendolen Fairfax (who has elements of this herself).
  • Beatrice from Much Ado About Nothing counts, despite predating the Regency Era quite a bit: she is independent, intelligent and has quite the rapier wit with a sharp tongue. While not being a man-hater, she doesn't need a man to complete her life, and no one would (dare) suggest that she wasn't anything but an exceptional lady.

Western Animation
  • Belle of Beauty and the Beast is a middle-class example: intelligent, witty, spirited in a subtly feminist way--but still feminine, refined, and gorgeous in a ballgown.
  • Rapunzel from Tangled. She's pretty good about following Mother Gothel's orders, but she's even better at finding loopholes around those rules.
  • Despite being dead, Emily of Corpse Bride plays the more spirited counterpart to the film's other heroine, a proper lady quite appropriately named Victoria.
Community Feedback Replies: 71
  • March 29, 2011
    captainbrass2
    Would Scarlett O'Hara of Gone With The Wind fit it here? For an alternative title you could try "Spirited Girl", as the key point of this character is precisely being rather more spirited than your average heroine of the period.
  • March 29, 2011
    StarryEyed
    • Cecily Cardew from The Importance Of Being Earnest. Her spirit and wit are vividly showcased in the tea scene, which quickly becomes a snark-off between her and Gwendolen Fairfax (who has elements of this herself)

    • Belle is a middle-class example: intelligent, witty, spirited in a subtly feminist way--but still feminine, refined, and gorgeous in a ballgown.

    As for the title, may I suggest Lady Of Wit And Spirit?

  • March 29, 2011
    TTurtle
    I kind of like the idea of a title with "Lady" in it somewhere, to indicate the connection to Proper Lady. Maybe Spirited Lady is another possibility. We considered Lady Of Wit in an early stage of planning, but thought that just saying "wit" was too limiting.
  • March 30, 2011
    Dacilriel
    Rose DeWitt Bukater from Titanic
  • March 30, 2011
    peccantis
    I don't suppose Scarlett is an example. She is deliberately manipulative and quite a bitch, i.e. not a lady at all.

    How about Spirited Young Lady? They tend to be young and unmarried.
  • March 30, 2011
    TTurtle
    @ Peccantis -- the thing is that "lady" is as much an indicator of class, education, and poise as it is of behavior. Scarlett is a lady in the sense of being a woman of the upper class who displays gentility. She's not a lady in the sense of having a generous or kind personality, though. How do we want to define "lady" here?
  • March 30, 2011
    captainbrass2
    @T Turtle - I'd go for the social definition. The common thing these characters have is that they're "ladies" in a social sense who don't necessarily always act in a lady-like way. Contrast Scarlett O'Hara with Melanie Wilkes, for example.
  • March 30, 2011
    0blivion
    The Lady Paragonal, perhaps? After all, the trope describes what most people thought as "the ideal woman".
  • March 30, 2011
    peccantis
    Still not sure about Scarlett. She's written in such an unadmiring a way that she gives off Anti Hero vibes. Aren't these Charming Talented Witty Young Ladies supposed to be straight played heroines? She can stay in the example list for what I care, but she's not your straight played typical example. Deconstructed maybe.

    As a random side note, this trope can be seen as a reconstruction of the Proper Lady, if the PL comes off as too doormat-ish for one's tastes.
  • March 30, 2011
    TTurtle
    Peccantis-- you raise a good question. Should this trope only be for heroines? I can think of some examples that would actually be the rival to a more Proper Lady-type heroine. (Mary Crawford of Mansfield Park, maybe). In fact, the Proper Lady and Spirited Young Lady are often paired together by way of contrast.
  • March 31, 2011
    peccantis
    Ok let's see...

    • Proper Lady vs. Spirited Young Lady - if the two compete, one will be deconstructed so that the other one can be the heroine. Proper Lady becomes Stuck Up Bitch or an Extreme Doormat, or SYL becomes a Destructively Wild Child or something.
    • Proper Lady & Spirited Young Lady - in peaceful coexistence, neither one needs to be deconstructed, and they might actually compliment each other's personalities: Gone With The Wind had a few moments of this when Melanie lay on her dying bed. She confessed she had admired Scarlett and wished to be more like her, while Scarlett shares similar thoughts about her.
  • March 31, 2011
    Kaoy
    Spirited Young Lady makes me think of Genki Girl.
  • March 31, 2011
    Thebes
    ^It makes me think of Period pieces. I read the name and knew immediately it was about a counter-point to the Proper Lady.
  • March 31, 2011
    Kaoy
    ^I still think it sounds like the PC-police's preferred 'correct' way of referring to a Genki Girl.
  • March 31, 2011
    TTurtle
    One of my concerns with Spirited Girl and (to a lesser extent) Spirited Young Lady is that they both might be too broad, since they could mean a wide variety of character types in different contexts. All of the more specific proposed titles seem unwieldy or inelegant, though. I am very definitely open to suggestions!
  • April 1, 2011
    peccantis
    IMHO, Rebellious Princess could be listed as a compare-with trope.
  • April 1, 2011
    captainbrass2
    Isobel Archer in Henry James' Portrait of a Lady.
  • April 1, 2011
    azul120
    See also: Plucky Girl.
  • April 2, 2011
    TTurtle
    We still need more examples, but I'm also open to feedback on the title.
  • April 2, 2011
    Thebes
    I still think it's good, clear meaning, obviously period, but I know some people don't agree.
  • April 2, 2011
    Kaoy
    ^Mine is more of a gripe than a real complaint. It works, its just that I feel its a little reminiscent of an entirely different trope. I wouldn't object to launching it simply on those grounds though.
  • April 2, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    • Beatrice from Much Ado About Nothing (predates Regency Era quite a bit, as it's Elizabethan, but I think she still counts) is independent, intelligent and has quite the rapier wit with a sharp tongue who, while not being a man-hater, doesn't need a man to complete her life, and no one would (dare) suggest that she wasn't anything but an exceptional lady.
  • April 2, 2011
    peccantis
    I'll say I like the current title (SLY). It's concise, and "young lady" is what these characters are, ladies who are young. "Spirited" doesn't quite begin to cover the "incredible surfeit of energy" a Genki Girl would have... If they decided to rename GG into English, I bet they'd go for something more like "Unendingly Energetic And Eager Girl" or something.
  • April 3, 2011
    TTurtle
    Well, we have time to think about it a bit more and see if we come up with anything better. I don't want to launch this yet anyway, because I'd like to see it get more examples first.
  • April 3, 2011
    whereismytea
    I don't think this is Genki Girl, but I really don't see what distinguishes this from Plucky Girl in Period Works.
  • April 3, 2011
    peccantis
    ^ SLY IS Plucky Girl In Period Works But With A Dash Of Rebellious Princess And The Heart Of A True Lady. To satisfy the social standards of her Period universe, and maybe her Period audience, she needs to meet at least the most important of Proper Lady standards. If she doesn't, she is an unacceptable woman. This character type doesn't exist outside universes with certain cultural and timeframes, where women have a lot of rules to follow to be accepted.
  • April 3, 2011
    whereismytea
    That sounds almost Too Specific To Sub-Trope.
  • April 3, 2011
    TTurtle
    Whereismytea: I can see why you'd think this is too specific, but this character shows up a LOT in historical fiction. One of the classic Heyer heroines pretty much embodies this trope, and Heyer influenced subsequent generations of historical romance authors. This trope actually arose out of a TRS discussion of the Yamato Nadeshiko, where it was decided to split that trope based on setting, so that Western characters weren't lumped in with Japanese characters. Then some people suggested that the problem was that in Western literature, there were really two separate sister tropes: the Proper Lady and this one, which was originally dubbed the Jane Austen Woman.

    Also, for the record, I'm not sure that the Spirited Young Lady is ALWAYS a Plucky Girl. Plucky Girl refers to optimism, doesn't it? But the "spirited" in SYL refers not to optimism but to boldness or even defiance. It's possible to be bold or defiant without also being optimistically determined.
  • April 3, 2011
    peccantis
    Yah, SYL can be Plucky Girl but it isn't needed.
  • April 3, 2011
    TTurtle
    However, the confusion between Plucky Girl and Genki Girl may suggest a need for a different title!
  • April 3, 2011
    whereismytea
    @T Turtle: Plucky is pretty well synonymous with spirited. Also, from the third paragraph of Plucky Girl: "[the girl exhibits] a strong sense of optimism and an unassailable spirit...You can beat her, but damned if she'll let you break her." Edit: Also, if you're thinking of pure optimism, that's more The Pollyanna.

    And I think that every one of these examples I recognize fits quite smoothly under Plucky Girl. Tropes Are Flexible. So, that said, if it is distinct enough to single out period examples, I recommend that it is explicitly a subtrope of Plucky Girl, in which case you should remove some of the examples off Plucky Girl and onto here when you launch.
  • April 3, 2011
    TTurtle
    My understanding is that Plucky Girl is The Determinator + optimism. I do think this trope is different; I don't think it's just a period-specific variation of the Plucky Girl. If anything, it's closest to Rebellious Princess, although the Spirited Young Lady may not go so far in her rebellion. Clearly I'm not articulating the difference well, though, so I'll have to think about it more.
  • April 3, 2011
    Windsong12
  • April 3, 2011
    TTurtle
    @ Whereismytea: Okay, this is a better response, but I'll leave the original one for posterity. Anyway, look at the original title: Charming Witty Lovely And Talented. That's unwieldy but it sums up the character traits of this trope fairly well. The trope MAY include elements of the Plucky Girl, but it also includes quite a bit else. In particular, wittiness is a major element. I think this is a problem with the trope title rather than with the trope itself. Maybe Lady Of Wit And Spirit would be better?

    ETA: looking at the description, I can see that there are some lines that might make it sound like the trope requires an overlap with Plucky Girl, so there might be more work needed on the description, too. Really, though, the wit and outspokenness are supposed to be more important than the "pluck" in this trope.
  • April 3, 2011
    Madrugada
    Whereismytea; are you familiar with Little Women? Meg is a Proper Lady, Jo is a Young Lady Of Wit And Spirit.

    In Black Beauty, the Lady Anne is a Young Lady Of Wit And Spirit, going by what little we see of her.
  • April 3, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    Heck, Belle from Beauty And The Beast qualifies as well, now that I think about it.
  • April 3, 2011
    peccantis
    In having independent dreams of faraway places and a geekish interest in books, and the way she handles Gaston (with grace but not without snark), Belle is a little bit more SLY than Proper Lady, although IMO the distinction is so subtle she's worth an entry in both lists.
  • April 4, 2011
    whereismytea
    @T Turtle: Fair enough, but the description definitely should be tweaked to reflect those things better. Also the title, because the razor-sharp wit bit really doesn't come through (although I'd agree Young Lady Of Wit And Spirit is unwieldy in comparison to the current one).

    @Madrugada: Jo is also rather plucky (good ol' Protestant optimism and work ethic and all).
  • April 5, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    If you know Period books, then you know when someone calls a girl 'spirited' back then it usually implies that they are either rebellious, or sharp-tongued and independent or both, so I think the title is just fine.

    • Also, definitely Alexia Tarobotti from The Parasol Protectorate series. She is a lady of high intellect and wit, who wears the appropriate clothing, and follows Edwardian manners to a T (except when it pleases her to break them for the purpose of moving things along because everyone else is being annoying and incompetent). In-universe, her 'spirit' is humorously attributed by her fellow Englishmen to her half-Italian blood, and her blunt and unsympathetic manner to her Soullessness. It Makes Sense In Context.
  • April 5, 2011
    DannyVElAcme
  • April 5, 2011
    TTurtle
    @ Noir Grimoir- Still, we want a title that's understood by people who aren't necessarily Vic lit fans, right? Right now I'm leaning more towards Young Lady Of Wit And Spirit, despite its wordiness.
  • April 5, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    Eh, I still think it gets the general point across, and then you can read the page for specifics. Might just need a down and dirty check-list that makes it easy to quickly identify whether a character counts for the trope or not.
  • April 6, 2011
    TTurtle
    Hmmm. . . if we put a checklist up, what would be on it? Class status? Wit? Outspokenness? propriety? Youth? Anything else?
  • April 6, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    Independence and self-sufficiency is a big one too, I think. And confidence, especially when speaking with men. They usually talk with men like they are equals (and if the books are to be believed, the men like it ^^). The rest looks good. In terms of class, they are usually gentry class, though occasionally they might be middle-class or nobility. The are pretty much never poor, or at least don't start out that way. Age is about 16 to 25, I would say. Too much older and they were just spinsters, younger and they weren't out in society to demonstrate this trope in the books.
  • April 6, 2011
    Thebes
    ^That looks pretty good.
  • April 7, 2011
    McKathlin
    I second including Spirited Young Lady antagonists and anti-heroes. Mary Crawford from Mansfield Park definitely fits the trope, even though her lack of a moral compass ultimately keeps her from being admirable.
  • April 7, 2011
    bluepenguin
    If we're including the more amoral type, there's Becky Sharpe from Vanity Fair. Beautiful, clever, strong-willed, manipulative as hell, and possibly a murderer.
  • April 7, 2011
    TTurtle
    Becky Sharpe starts off as this, but she veers into some very disreputable behavior -- I'm not sure whether to count her. Someone who is separated from her husband because of (potential) infidelity might not meet the standards of the trope. This raises the issue of how much propriety should count for this trope.
  • April 8, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    I don't think villains and anti-heroes should be counted. For one thing, I can't think there a many of them who aren't simply trying to pass themselves off as regular Proper Ladies as a Bitch In Sheeps Clothing, and part of the mystique of this trope is that people are supposed to admire the Spirited Young Lady and when they're evil it really defeats that purpose. It just doesn't have the same feel, if you understand me. If there's a real question, then the points for and against can be added in the description of the example.

  • April 8, 2011
    TTurtle
    @ Noir Grimoir -- so, what's your take on Scarlett from Gone With The Wind? We had some discussion about her, too, when someone upthread suggested adding her. I ended up adding the example with qualifications.
  • April 8, 2011
    peccantis
    Maybe we could list heroines and anti heroines separately?
  • April 8, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    ^^ I honestly don't know enough about her, but my impression from what I do know about her is that she was sort of a Period version of The Libby (or Lovable Libby to some). I feel like the idea of the Spirited Young Lady is much more a heroic ideal. Type, 1 or 2 antiheroes might apply to the trope, but if a character is manipulative then I think it should almost automatically disqualify them. I think bluntness, frankness and honesty might also be a qualifier for the trope (except for white lies and when they are holding their tongue out of deference to manners). Then again as long as they make a case and explain why there is a question as to qualifying then I don't see too much wrong with adding it to the examples.

    On an unrelated note to that, it has occurred to me that there is a related trope, featuring outrageously improper and foolish little sisters to either the Proper Lady or Spirited Young Lady, maybe someone wants to start that YKTTW? I can think of two or three exampes off the top of my head.
  • April 8, 2011
    TTurtle
    @ Noir Grimoir: If we take out the anti-hero/villain characters, I'll need to rework the paragraph about the way this character relates to the Proper Lady. It's still the case that the Proper Lady may serve as a rival to the SYL, but I don't know how likely it is for the pure, heroic SYL to serve as the rival to the Proper Lady, since those rivals are usually negative versions of the SYL. Thoughts on how to do that?
  • April 8, 2011
    Thebes
    I'd say leave them. At least some. I see no reason a period Libby couldn't be an unsympathetic Spirited Young Lady or a Bitch In Sheeps Clothing Proper Lady.

    Maybe you should mention what this trope isn't, for example Cinderella's stepsisters are nobles and the rivals of a Proper Lady, but lack the wit and charm to fit this trope.
  • April 8, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    I don't know. I feel like the SYL ideal is not very manipulative at all, and more villainous characters who might qualify for this trope are manipulative. But I suppose we can accept them, as long as the examples explain why they qualify.
  • April 8, 2011
    Thebes
    Well, one of the main qualities of the SYL is charm, which, used by an unsympathetic character, comes across as manipulation.

    .... I can't tell if that's evidence for or against.
  • April 9, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    I think of Elizabeth Bennet as THE ideal example of an SYL, and she isn't manipulative at all. She's frank and open about her feelings. If she wants something from you, she'll come out and say it.

    Then again, I have to wonder who many characters other then Scarlett even have this problem as to whether they qualify? I suppose she counts until there are enough other examples with the issue that it's actually a problem. She might just be an unusual manifestation of this trope.
  • April 9, 2011
    Lavalyte
    Rachel Weisz' character from The Mummy
  • April 9, 2011
    peccantis
    I suppose Just A Woman gets launched long befor this does, so I'd like to hint that SYL has a tendency to prove she is not "Just A Woman". Or at least that's a very potential plot element for SY Ls.
  • April 9, 2011
    TTurtle
    @ Noir Grimoir: I agree that Elizabeth Bennet is probably the best example of this trope, but that doesn't mean that all SY Ls have to be exactly like her. What about Emma? Would she be discredited as a SYL simply because she's crazy manipulative? When all's said and done, I think she is supposed to be the heroine of the novel. Mary Crawford is another example like Scarlett. To me the most troubling of the anti-hero examples is Becky Sharpe; I put her up as an example but I may take her out. It's true that she is opposed to Amelia the Proper Lady, but I think she's too villainous to count for this trope.
  • April 9, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    ^Yes, I think we should take outright villains and villain protagonists out of the equation. Like I said, to be honest I really feel as if the manipulative examples of this trope are actually just period versions of another trope. The Libby, Femme Fatale, Manipulative Bitch, The Vamp etc. It's just that the period happens to be regency/victorian/edwardian or whatever. So while obviously all incarnations of this trope don't have to exactly fit Elizabeth Bennets example, I do think it's good to keep in mind that she isn't remotely manipulative and one might even say Brutal Honesty is closer to one of her defining traits. And of course everyone is manipulative at some point, but I think if manipulation, especially morally questionable manipulation, is a characters defining trait then they need not apply to this trope. Although I have to admit a part of me can see where it might make sense to accept them...hm.

    Okay, how about this. If a character is treated or commented on in-universe as being a SYL, then they fit no matter what. If they are just treated as a villain or a bitch, then they don't. Scarlett would fit then, I think. Don't know enough about Becky to say in her case.
  • April 10, 2011
    TTurtle
    @ Noir Grimoir: Okay, I took Becky Sharpe out. The distinction you're making makes sense. I'll see if I can come up with a way to indicate this without getting too wordy.

    @ Peccantis: How do you think we should word this? I hadn't noticed that YKTTW until you mentioned it.
  • April 11, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    I think this is getting close to launch, yes?
  • April 11, 2011
    TTurtle
    I was just thinking the same thing. Any last words of wisdom from anyone on the description?
  • April 11, 2011
    Thebes
    Do we have a pic?
  • April 11, 2011
    TTurtle
    @Thebes: No, we do not! I'm no good with image picking. Do you have one in mind?
  • April 12, 2011
    Thebes
    Nothing off the top of my head. I'll dig around a bit. I'm thinking Period Dress on a horse, snarky expression a bonus.
  • April 12, 2011
    Deboss
    I've heard the term Spit Fire used for this as well.
  • April 12, 2011
    TTurtle
    Shall we go ahead and launch without the image? That can come later, if we find a good one.
  • April 12, 2011
    Thebes
    Sure.
  • April 13, 2011
    Cidolfas
    One more example: Ada Lovelace from Robert Rankin's The Japanese Devil Fish Girl.
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