Created By: NoirGrimoirOctober 16, 2011 Last Edited By: 69BookWorM69October 23, 2011
Troped

Cool Crown

The headgear of choice for royalty.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
A sure-fire way to get across that you are important is to wear a Cool Crown. It's the headgear of choice for Kings, Queens and Princesses alike, and no Requisite Royal Regalia would be complete without it.

Cool Crowns come in many sizes and shapes but a few have distinct associations:

  • Tiaras are the iconic crown of the Princess Classic and heavily associated with fairytales. Perched directly on top of the head, usually with heart or flower designs worked in, they are dainty and sparkly and make great hair accessories. It's almost solely women who wear tiaras, and usually not worn by High Royalty, like Queens or Empresses. Not if they want to be taken seriously, anyway.
    • Frill-like Diadems, often seen being worn by Pageant Queens also tend to have the same connotations as tiaras despite having more robustness, similar to a heavy circlet.
  • Circlets are the staple of Modest Royalty. Who wants to wear a heavy, clunky crown everywhere? These Royals need to be able to move and get things done. The circlet is usually a ribbon-like strand of metal that wraps around the forehead, sometimes with a simple jewel on the front, or a heavier band that perches atop the head that may have other decorations, but no hoops or caps. They are worn by both genders, and Elves seem to like the really thin across-the-forehead kind, for some reason.
  • Hoop Crowns, with arches, jewels and velvety-cloth caps or ermine-edging are the coolest crowns of them all and usually only Kings, and the occasional Queen, get to wear them. They are big and in your face and anyone wearing one is really important, or seems to want you to think he is. Even most Royalty don't like to wear them all the time, though. During everyday royal activities such a crown may be exchanged for a circlet.
  • Laurel Wreaths are associated with the Roman Caesars and despite being less obnoxious than the typical crown, resembling circlets more in their modesty, they tend to indicate someone who is at the top, in terms of importance. Emperors and Greek Gods really like them. The wreath is usually gold, but occasionally may be made of actual leaves.

Subtrope of Nice Hat and Requisite Royal Regalia. The main prop involved in an Awesome Moment Of Crowning.

Examples:

General
  • In high school settings, the King and Queen of the Prom (or Homecoming Queen and King) get crowns for the occasion.

Anime And Manga
  • In Bleach, Baraggan Louisenbairn has a bone-like protrusion out of his head that resembles a crown. Fitting, as prior to encountering Aizen, he was the king of Hueco Mundo. His Resurreccion form had a more normal crown on his head, made of gold and encrusted with all sorts of jewels.

Comics
  • When seen in animation, Aquaman, who is king of Atlantis, is rarely to never seen with his crown on. His wife, Mera, however, is rarely to never seen without hers.

Film
  • In Anastasia, the titular Russian princess wears a very sparkly diadem with her princess dress.
  • Averted in Star Wars. Despite having royalty, no one ever sports a crown.
  • In Robin Hood 2010, King Richard's helmet has a crown built into it.
  • Rapunzel has a tiara in Tangled. Her parents have hoop crowns.

Literature
  • In the Heralds Of Valdemar series, the Valdemaran royals wear understated circlets to go with their Modest Royalty and indicate they don't think they are better than their subjects. Other royals in neighboring countries either copied them or came up with the idea independently (probably the latter).
  • The Awesome Moment Of Crowning scene in The Lion The Witch And The Wardrobe makes a special point of mentioning that the crowns given to the Pevences aren't the heavy, gaudy, over-emblished sort (like the British Crown Jewels) but elegant circlets. The royal lines of Narnia all tend to fall in the Royals Who Actually Do Something camp.
  • The Wheel Of Time book A Crown of Swords is named after the Laurel Crown of Illian. The crown is of a laurel wreath design, but between the leaves are tiny daggers alternately pointing up and down; the intention in the design is that the wearer can never wear it comfortably, reminding him of the obligation and danger it represents. After he notices this, Rand gives the Laurel Crown its other name.
  • The crown of the dragons in The Enchanted Forest Chronicles is a heavy circlet made of iron. When, after her first day as King, Kazul exhaustedly hurls it against the wall, Cimorene chides that she shouldn't treat the crown that way. Kazul responds, "Of course I should. It's expected. That's why we made it out of iron and not something soft and pliable like gold."
  • In Lord Of The Rings the first crown of Gondor was and actual war helm that belonged to Isildur, and the second (Aragorn was crowned with it), was a more pimped-up, crown-like helm. And in the other Numenorean kingdom, Arnor, a simple circlet with a single diamond was used.
  • In the Deryni works, there's a number of these:
    • The Haldanes have the State Crown of Gwynedd, bejeweled and with intertwined gold leaves and crosses, worn at coronations and state occasions. Even Kelson wears this when duty calls for it, though he prefers a "simpler circlet of gold" like the hammered gold circlet he wears when addressing the bishops at Valoret in The Quest for Saint Camber.
    • Also in The Quest for Saint Camber, Kelson wears "the oldest and plainest of Kelson's official crowns: a band of hammered gold two fingers wide, chased with a design of Celtic interlace and set with small, round cabochon rubies in some of the interstices."
    • Caitrin Quinnell, soi-disant Queen of Meara, has a regal crown of gold set with sapphires and rubies. This one is notably heavy; it creases Caitrin's brow (the marks are visible when she takes it off), Ithel flinches under its weight when Caitrin briefly sets it on his head, and Kelson complains of its weight after wearing it at the surrender ceremony in Laas.
    • Matyas brings a crown from Torenth's treasury when he comes to Rhemuth to escort Liam-Lajos back for his investiture: "a handsome circlet of beaten gold, nearly the width of a man's three fingers, set round with smoky balas rubies, baroque pearls, and chunky rough-polished emeralds the size of a man's thumbnail." Liam receives a newer traditional Torenthi crown at the ceremony: "a golden diadem studded with rubies and emeralds and pearls, with great jeweled pendants hanging just short of his shoulders at either side.".
  • Exiern King Urtica has the circlet (emblazoned with a stylised sun) style of crown, which is in keeping with his status as a hard-working (albeit in a Magnificent Bastard cum Chess Master kind of way) monarch.
  • In Wyrd Sisters Lancre doesn't have a flashy crown, well not compared to the crowns a group of actors have. It's lampshaded by Granny Weatherwax that imitation crowns are always cool and flashy looking, because that is what people expect crowns to be. Real crowns are just an impractical hat and badge of office so aren't that impressive.
  • In the Elenium, the sapphire rose Bhelliom once adorned the Crown of Thalasia, until the loss of both crown and the king who wore it in circumstances very similar to Isildur's loss of the One Ring.

Video Games
  • The Super Mario series subverts the association of Princesses with tiaras by giving Princess Peach a heavy gold circlet decked out in sparkly jewels. Her crown is also a treasure in Pikmin Two (the first region, pretty much as far away as you can get from the landing site).
  • In Angry Birds, some of the bigger and tougher Pigs wear crowns. Such attire is usually switched with whatever headgear is appropriate for the level's theme, however.
  • In Super Mario Bros enemy bosses have these.

Western Animation
  • In My Little Pony Friendship Is Magic, Rarity wore a tiara with her dress for the Galloping Gala and Rainbow Dash wore a Laurel Wreath. Twilight also has a tiara-thing that she wears when the ponies must use the Elements of Harmony. Both Princess Celestia and Princess Luna also wear tiaras.
  • All fairies on Fairly Oddparents wear "floaty crowny things".
  • The Fire Lord and his family of the Fire Nation in Avatar The Last Airbender all have a hair ornaments that stand in as crowns.
Community Feedback Replies: 52
  • October 16, 2011
    Elle
  • October 16, 2011
    GreenMachine
    • Super Mario series: Doesn't Princess Peach wear a full crown at times? I specifically remember it being a treasure in Pikmin 2 (the first region, pretty much as far away as you can get from the landing site). I think she mostly wears it when she's been kidnapped...
  • October 16, 2011
    ParadiscaCorbasi
  • October 16, 2011
    DragonQuestZ
    Since this is "cool crown", and Nice Hat is about more than just hats, I feel that just wearing a crown might not be enough. It has to be elaborate or noticeable. Now that would still cover a lot of examples, but it would help reduce any and all examples of wearing crowns.

    Oh, and how about this picture for the trope picture?
  • October 16, 2011
    randomsurfer
    In ads for Imperial Margarine just taking a bite gives you the Full Crown.
  • October 17, 2011
    aurora369
    The technical term for a big full crown is hoop crown.
  • October 17, 2011
    aurora369
    I second the poring king as the page image.
  • October 17, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    I think any image should show the various types.
  • October 18, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    I'm looking for small images for a composite montage. I've uploaded a couple, but I've turned off the addresses below so the formatting doesn't go beserk.

    [[quoteright:123:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/crownofmonomakh_4758.jpg]]

    [[quoteright:171:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/crown_3877.jpg]]

    [[quoteright:319:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/MissU2011_5311.jpg]]

    I'm trying to get a small version of other styles, but I have to go to work now.
  • October 18, 2011
    ParadiscaCorbasi
  • October 19, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    Here's a group of crowns ready made that might do for a page image:

    [[quoteright:256:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/crowns_4604.jpg]]
  • October 19, 2011
    DragonQuestZ
    We might need a collage. I'll whip one up, just to see how it would work.
  • October 19, 2011
    DragonQuestZ
    Hows this? And the caption would link to the works, but YKTTW just doesn't work with hottips.


  • October 19, 2011
    bulmabriefs144
    I'm liking the caption picture.
  • October 19, 2011
    X2X
    Would nobles and Ojou-esque characters work within the context of this idea?
  • October 19, 2011
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ If the crowns are fancy enough.
  • October 19, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    It needs a forehead-type circlet. Technically Sailor Moon's tiara is like a fore-head type circlet, but they call it a tiara anyway. Also it doesn't have any character with Laurel Leaves. I think any picture should clearly illustrate each type, like the Zettai Ryouiki's picture does. It should be useful, not just "here, have some random crowns!"
  • October 19, 2011
    DragonQuestZ
    That other trope is showing just sock types, not showing the types of the trope. And there are too many crown types to actually show them all.

    And so what if this is random? The point is in the pothole at the end of the caption.
  • October 19, 2011
    ZombieAladdin
    In Bleach, Baraggan Louisenbairn has a bone-like protrusion out of his head that resembles a crown. Fitting, as prior to encountering Aizen, he was the king of Hueco Mundo. His Resurrección form had a more normal crown on his head, made of gold and encrusted with all sorts of jewels.
  • October 19, 2011
    Generality
    • The Wheel Of Time book A Crown of Swords is named after the Laurel Crown of Illian. The crown is of a laurel wreath design, but between the leaves are tiny daggers alternately pointing up and down; the intention in the design is that the wearer can never wear it comfortably, reminding him of the obligation and danger it represents. After he notices this, Rand gives the Laurel Crown its other name.
    • The crown of the dragons in The Enchanted Forest Chronicles is a heavy circlet made of iron. When, after her first day as King, Kazul exhaustedly hurls it against the wall, Cimorene chides that she shouldn't treat the crown that way. Kazul responds, "Of course I should. It's expected. That's why we made it out of iron and not something soft and pliable like gold."
  • October 19, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    ^^^There are five, maybe six types. How is that too many types? That's exactly how many you have on that picture.
  • October 19, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    Here's a pic of a guy wearing a laurel wreath:

    [[quoteright:140:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/laurelwreathworn_736.jpg ]].
  • October 19, 2011
    DragonQuestZ
    ^^ I didn't mean the picture had too many types. I meant the reality did. I limited it to six to show variety at good detail, but not make a vertical wall of images. The point is not to catalog every type. It's just to show that this trope can come in many forms.
  • October 19, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    Literature example:
    • In the Deryni works, there's a number of these:
      • The Haldanes have the State Crown of Gwynedd, bejeweled and with gold leaves, worn at coronations and state occasions. Even Kelson wears this when duty calls for it, though he prefers a "simpler circlet of gold" like the hammered gold circlet he wears when addressing the bishops at Valoret in The Quest for Saint Camber.
      • Also in The Quest for Saint Camber, Kelson wears "the oldest and plainest of Kelson's official crowns: a band of hammered gold two fingers wide, chased with a design of Celtic interlace and set with small, round cabochon rubies in some of the interstices."
      • Caitrin Quinnell, soi-disant Queen of Meara, has a regal crown of gold set with sapphires and rubies. This one is notably heavy; it creases Caitrin's brow (the marks are visible when she takes it off), Ithel flinches under its weight when Caitrin briefly sets it on his head, and Kelson complains of its weight after wearing it at the surrender ceremony in Laas.
      • Matyas brings a crown from Torenth's treasury when he comes to Rhemuth to escort Liam-Lajos back for his investiture. It too has gems the size of a man's thumbnail. Liam receives a newer traditional Torenthi crown at the ceremony.
  • October 19, 2011
    ParadiscaCorbasi
    • When seen in animation, Aquaman, who is king of Atlantis, is rarely to never seen with his crown on. His wife, Mera, however, is rarely to never seen without hers.
    • In high school settings, the King and Queen of the Prom (or Homecoming Queen and King) get crowns for the occasion.

  • October 19, 2011
    jatay3
    Numenorean Crowns like the crown Aragorn was crowned with in Lord Of The Rings were decorated war helms.
  • October 19, 2011
    aurora369
    Comment on Lord Of The Rings: the crowns were more precisely Gondorian, since in Numenor itself a sceptre was the primary sign of royalty. There were two of them in succession: the first, an actual war helm that belonged to Isildur, and the second (Aragorn was crowned with it), a more pimped-up, more crownlike helm.

    And in the other Numenorean kingdom, Arnor, a simple circlet with a single diamond was used.
  • October 19, 2011
    jatay3
    Interesting, Aurora. Been a while sense I read that. I do remember the sceptre thing though.
  • October 19, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    @ Dragon Quest Z. I don't get why it's too much to ask to have an example of a tiara, a diadem (this one's optional), thin circlet, heavy circlet, a hoop crown and laurel wreath exactly, so people know which is which. The point of explaining those types is that each one has specific associations. Any other crown type is just means 'generic royalty'.
  • October 19, 2011
    AP
    • Averted in Star Wars. Despite having royalty, no one ever sports a crown.
  • October 20, 2011
    ZombieAladdin
    By the way, since non-standard characters turn up weird in this, the strange characters in the word "Resurreccion" (in the Bleach entry) should be an "o" with the accent mark pointed to the upper-right.
  • October 20, 2011
    DragonQuestZ
    ^^^ This trope is "cool crown", not "useful notes: crowns".
  • October 20, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    If it was useful notes: crowns, the page would be a lot longer. And there are tons of tropes that have diagrams and such to explain the trope, don't pretend like there aren't.

    I'm going to leave it picture-less when its launched. You can take it through Image Picking yourself and see what they decide. I'll accept whatever they choose.
  • October 21, 2011
    Chabal2
    Film: In Robin Hood 2010, King Richard's helmet has a crown built into it.

  • October 21, 2011
    CrypticMirror
    Exiern King Urtica has the circlet (emblazoned with a stylised sun) style of crown, which is in keeping with his status as a hard-working (albeit in a Magnificent Bastard cum Chess Master kind of way) monarch.

    In Wyrd Sisters Lancre doesn't have a flashy crown, well not compared to the crowns a group of actors have. It's lampshaded by Granny Weatherwax that imitation crowns are always cool and flashy looking, because that is what people expect crowns to be. Real crowns are just an impractical hat and badge of office so aren't that impressive.
  • October 21, 2011
    Generality
  • October 21, 2011
    DragonQuestZ
    "And there are tons of tropes that have diagrams and such to explain the trope, don't pretend like there aren't."

    I didn't claim there aren't any. You are claiming that it's necessary for this trope, when it's not.

    And my point about useful notes was that it would be a legit reason to list every major crown type, but it's not that, so that reason is not valid.

    "I'm going to leave it picture-less when its launched."

    That's really petty. If I turn down a picture in ykttw, it's because I feel it shows the trope poorly, not leaves one optional aspect out that I really want.
  • October 21, 2011
    DragonQuestZ
    If you really want a laurel wreath picture on the collage, then ask for it, and I would do it (preferably also requesting another type of crown not shown to make it an even 8).

    But it's just something you want added (which itself isn't bad, as you're entitled to an opinion), not something that is needed, as though one type of crown left out magically wouldn't show the trope then (which is unnecessarily trying to make an opinion appear as fact).
  • October 21, 2011
    lulzipents
    Super Mario Bros. enemy bosses have these.
  • October 21, 2011
    ZombieAladdin
    In Angry Birds, some of the bigger and tougher Pigs wear crowns. Such attire is usually switched with whatever headgear is appropriate for the level's theme, however.
  • October 21, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    @Dragon Quest Z My primary purpose in suggesting leaving it picture-less wasn't to be petty, but to stop this argument. You're the one whose being petty. All I asked was that whatever picture we have, show every type listed. That is it. I don't understand why you're being so antagonistic. All you'd have to do is switch out one or two of the pictures. Now I will not talk about this anymore unless you change your attitude. If you really want to push the picture through, then take it up with Image Picking.

    Also if anyone wants to suggest associations with other types of crowns, I'd be happy to hear and add them.
  • October 21, 2011
    DragonQuestZ
    "All I asked was that whatever picture we have, show every type listed."

    Um, you didn't state before that you meant in the description. I thought you meant every type of crown, period. The latter is very different. The former is fine. And if you would put it up, I would add a laurel wreath to the collage. Do you just have another kind of crown you want added?
  • October 21, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    I really don't think I was being that vague, but I'll accept that there may have been some kind of misunderstanding between us.

    I would prefer if one of the pictures was a 'laurel crown' type and one was more obviously a thin, forehead circlet-type. Technically Sailor Moon's is, but it's called a tiara in the show, and it's almost more of a hair-deck anyway. I'd just prefer if a circlet picture was more obviously 'circlet-like'. Personally I'd rather the 'full crown' version the blob is supposed to represent actually have hoops, but if you guys are just in love with that picture you can keep it I suppose.
  • October 21, 2011
    DragonQuestZ
    "I really don't think I was being that vague, but I'll accept that there may have been some kind of misunderstanding between us."

    Hey, I misread, and sorry about the misunderstanding. I missed that in the description, so mea culpa.

    "I would prefer if one of the pictures was a 'laurel crown' type and one was more obviously a thin, forehead circlet-type. Technically Sailor Moon's is, but it's called a tiara in the show, and it's almost more of a hair-deck anyway."

    Or I can add Saphire's crown from Disgaea 3.

    "Personally I'd rather the 'full crown' version the blob is supposed to represent actually have hoops, but if you guys are just in love with that picture you can keep it I suppose."

    Well it's also to show you can see a crown in on several types of creatures.
  • October 21, 2011
    DragonQuestZ
    How's this?

    Just a fraction of the many types of crowns. (Left to right:Queen Elizabeth II, Aragorn, Sailor Moon, King Slime, Tiana, Claudius, Sapphire, Starscream)

  • October 22, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    I'll approve it.

    I'll put it on when the trope launches, though, since YKTTW doesn't like right justified captions and with the bullet points it will have to be right justified.
  • October 22, 2011
    DragonQuestZ
    I know that perfectly well. Just also be sure to make the parentheses a hottip.
  • October 22, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    Ah, okay, got it.
  • October 22, 2011
    ParadiscaCorbasi
    Rapunzel has a tiara in Tangled. Her parents have hoop crowns.
  • October 23, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    @ NoirGrimoir I've looked up specific descriptions in the canon of the crowns in one of my examples and quoted the descriptions. It helps to have the details at hand.
  • October 23, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    ^ What are you trying to tell me to do? Helps what?
  • October 23, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    No, no, it's not about you; it's about my faulty memory, and my foolishness to loan books and not get them back. I had to borrow a copy of King Kelson's Bride from the library to get the gorgeous details on Liam's crowns (which are illustrative of the trope), then I added the details directly to the description instead of posting them in the comments.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable