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Real Heroes Dont Have Internships
Rookie Hero recieves dangerous high ranking jobs early in their career
Description Needs Help Needs Examples Tropeworthy? Up For Grabs

(permanent link) added: 2012-11-01 02:52:27 sponsor: PsychoFreaX edited by: StarSword (last reply: 2012-11-12 21:57:24)

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Just to clarify, this is Up for Grabs now.

So you got a rookie hero who just started his villain fighting career. Maybe he became a ninja or an agent for an organization. In any case it would be realistic that starting those career means you'll need to start with more safe simple basic jobs, such as patrolling and slowly move upwards until you had enough training and proved yourself skilled enough to take on tougher missions. But that's just not really interesting.

With this trope, usually when you read about a hero who's just starting in these types of career, they'll usually happen to take on a much more dangerous mission early on that's beyond their expectation. The reason they receive such a job can range from the mission being given to them by mistake, it was an urgent case or they arrogantly insist on taking a more exciting mission despite what authorities advise against. There may also be cases where a Sink or Swim Mentor does this to trainees deliberately.

But in any case, it makes for a more interesting story when the hero goes up against a challenge where they shouldn't be expected to survive. But then again they are the hero so Genre Savvy viewers should know they'll still pull through.


Examples:

Anime & Manga
  • In Naruto, ninjas actually start out really slowly with D rank missions which are really mundane jobs like weeding and walking dogs. But the main characters are given an A rank mission by mistake.
  • This is lampshaded in YuYu Hakusho with Yusuke's first case when Botan complained to Koenma about throwing him to a pack of wolves. Koenma did answer he would have preferred to start him on smaller cases to train him. But it really was an urgent case.
  • Neon Genesis Evangelion deconstructs this like everything else it deals with. Shinji is brought to NERV, put in his Eva and sent straight out to fight Sachiel. He can't even walk in it and gets Curb Stomped. Fortunately, his Eva goes berserk and wins the battle for him.

Comic Books
  • In Ultimate Spider-Man, Spider-Man himself is not really a rookie, but he and his team are still somewhat new to being superheroes. Their first mission? Taking on Doctor Doom, one of the most infamous villains in the Marvel Universe.

Film
  • Point of No Return. After going through intense training, Amanda is taken out to dinner by her boss. She is then informed that she's actually on her first mission, to assassinate a man with no preparation or planning. She's also given false information that could have led to being caught. She succeeds in the mission anyway.
  • In keeping with the Desperate Freedom Fighters motif, the Rebel Alliance in Star Wars often had to make do with fairly green pilots in addition to all its other problems. Luke at least had practical experience as a bush pilot on Tatooine, but many of the other pilots sent against the Death Star were actually on their first mission. Deconstructed in that as a result of their lack of training and the suicidal odds, only three of thirty pilots made it back.

Literature
  • In the Lensmen novel Galactic Patrol the main character is given an incredibly important and very dangerous mission right after graduating from the academy, due to his promising performance the fact that the ship he commands is so experimental that a more experienced commander would only have the wrong habits.

Live-Action TV
  • The SGC in Stargate SG-1 initially had an element of this for the simple reason that no one on the entire planet (apart from the survivors of O'Neill's team from the movie) had been offworld before. They compensated somewhat by drawing the military members of the early SG teams from individuals who were already special forces-qualified. They also eventually introduced a training program seen in "Proving Ground" that greatly reduced offworld deaths and injuries.

Video Games
  • The player character of Dawn of War II and Chaos Rising was but a rookie who had won a battle when he was promoted to Force Commander of the Blood Ravens. It is noted that he was so hastily promoted that he did not even see the Chapter Master, who would normally approve of such things. This is justified in part because the failure of Indrick Boreale back in Soulstorm cost the Blood Ravens almost half of their entire chapter.
  • The first mission in Wing Commander is supposed to be to ease in the new recruits (including yourself.) It's a combat mission, of course, and the recruits are in command of their squadrons, with the vets that are supposed to be mentoring them ordered to let them call the shots.

Western Animation
  • This is parodied in an episode of South Park when the four main kids had investigated and found a girl's missing doll, earning them the title of junior detectives by the police force. They are given their first case, which was to investigate a meth lab where the criminals there are all armed with firearms and can easily kill them. This is due to all the adults in the town really are just idiots.

Real Life
  • Some military traditions in countries that had a lot of wars on their territory, such as Russia, have provisions for accelerated wartime officer training courses. These courses start when the army is bled dry of lieutenants early in a large land war; they take any and all young men with any education even vaguely useful in the army, retrain them for several months, dub them "junior lieutenants" and send to the frontlines.
  • A related peacetime institution is the Soviet voyennaya kafedra (military school). These schools work in civilian universities; students are given basic military training one day per week and dubbed lieutenants after graduation. A few of these still exist today, but their output is insufficient to fully abolish the need of wartime courses in case of a large war.

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