Created By: BluSuedeNicNac81 on August 5, 2012 Last Edited By: BluSuedeNicNac81 on August 7, 2012

Riding the Hovercar

To experience any story, the audience must first get in the hovercar

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Trope
The initiation, perpetuation, and conclusion of the Willing Suspension of Disbelief as experienced by the audience. The audience first chooses to submit to the unreality of the story and "get in the hovercar." Upon completion of the story, the audience exits the hovercar. The believably of the story thus hinges upon the smoothness of the hovercar ride.

Asking the audience to get in the hovercar is a metaphor for asking them to leave Real Life behind for a moment and step into the fantasy. The state that follows during the hovercar ride is the Willing Suspension of Disbelief. The hovercar, while immune to pot holes, is succeptible to Plot Holes that can jar the audience from that state if they are large enough and/or hit at high enough speed.

While not all hovercars are made equally, they are present in every story.
Community Feedback Replies: 21
  • August 5, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    Name looks too literal, as there are scenes of this in movies to make it look like the literal riding on top of a hovercar that a character does.

    As this is, it's not a trope, it's an analogy.
  • August 5, 2012
    BluSuedeNicNac81
    I could say the same of Jumping The Shark, yes?
  • August 5, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ That is a fan term for a moment, not an analogy. You think the term is strictly figurative?
  • August 5, 2012
    abk0100
    So what you're saying is, I had a hovercraft inside me all along?
  • August 5, 2012
    BluSuedeNicNac81
    well, neither are analogies and both are metaphors (Grammar Nazi moment, sorry).

    Figurative is what I'm going for. A hovercar is an appreciably unbelievable piece of technology. Asking the audience to get in the hovercar is a metaphor for asking them to leave Real Life behind for a moment and step into the fantasy. The state that follows during the hovercar ride is the Willing Suspension Of Disbelief. the hovercar, while immune to pot holes, is succeptible to Plot Holes that can jar the audience from that state if they are large enough and/or hit at high enough speed.
  • August 5, 2012
    BluSuedeNicNac81
    I'll be honest, I came up with this because I was thinking of something to say to my buddy who was complaining about a movie because the technology was impossible, and "Just get in the hovercar" seemed like a good comeback, lol.
  • August 5, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ That's just Fan Dumb or Hate Dumb.
  • August 5, 2012
    BluSuedeNicNac81
    how so?
  • August 5, 2012
    pcw2727
  • August 5, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^^ Wait. Was it a sci fi movie, or one that took place in modern day?
  • August 5, 2012
    BluSuedeNicNac81
    It was the Avengers, so both I guess lol. Of all the things to set him off, he just couldn't accept that an aircraft carrier could be made to fly.
  • August 5, 2012
    BluSuedeNicNac81
    and PCW, i didn't think so either at first, but it's really more in Omnipresent Tropes territory. Every storyteller has to get the listener to first buy into his fantasy, then keep them strung along, and finally deposit them at the ending - preferably wanting to come back for more. It's a "recognizable pattern... in the fan experience," which qualifies it as a trope.
  • August 5, 2012
    Stratadrake
    ^ ^^ Notice the pencil icon next to your posts; that is called the "edit" button.
  • August 5, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    Well fantasy and sci fi includes comic books, but if your friend was just ready to accept superpower and not high tech...

    This is still just YMMV plus Willing Suspension Of Disbelief, and the latter already implies a bit of ymmv.
  • August 5, 2012
    BluSuedeNicNac81
    I think it was an uncanny valley sort of thing with the high tech. Or maybe he was just being disagreeable, idk.

    I don't see comparison. Everyone gets on the hovercar when they see a movie or read a book or whatever. I'm not about to propose different makes and models for different genres or tastes or anything. THAT would certainly be YMMV.

    ^^I know, I just try not to use it unless I'm correcting grammar or something. It's a habit you pick up if you do lots of collaborative writing using Word.
  • August 5, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^ I'm not suggesting different makes. I'm just stating a likely reason your friend thought that was the unrealistic part.
  • August 5, 2012
    randomsurfer
    I think this is the Anthropic Principle. "For any given story, there exist basic elements that are required for the story itself to happen; there would be no story otherwise."
  • August 6, 2012
    Arivne
    We're trying to avoid trope names that are likely to confuse the reader, so "Riding the Hovercar" definitely needs to be changed.

    Also, isn't this pretty much covered by Willing Suspension Of Disbelief?
  • August 6, 2012
    fulltimeD
  • August 6, 2012
    BluSuedeNicNac81
    "the Anthropic Principle says that certain details of the story do matter because they are the foundations that the story itself is built upon, and accepting those details on faith is critical to the audience's enjoyment of the show, even if it doesn't make much sense from an outside viewpoint."

    That covers it quite nicely! Thanks randomsurfer!
  • August 7, 2012
    Diask
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=nzdm272o1wvxyfjldgjof9ys