Created By: Gemmifer on January 14, 2008
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Break The Haughty

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In fiction, it's dangerous to carry one's head to high. What kind of character is used for this story varies, it can be anyone from warrior prince to high school beauty but their defining trait is that they have a really high opinion of themselves a rather low opinion of... everyone else. The plot usually sets out to teach them the error of their ways through a lot of painful and/or humiliating lessons. The proud character either ends up bitter and alone or having to depend on others which makes them more humble. They learn the Aesop or not, but the public gets to learn it either way. It might be related to Rape as Redemption (with particularly disturbing implications) or Ineffectual Loner though the character can be just as well very popular and sociable. Not related to Spikification because high-and-mighty isn't as great as they think and also hasn't necessarily any inner demons. They're just arrogant. A really stupid example would be Vegeta from Dragon Ball Z who doubles as Ineffectual Loner. Can you think of other examples where this has happened?
Community Feedback Replies: 17
  • January 14, 2008
    BrightBlueInk
    I think both Asuka from Neon Genesis Evangelion and Autor from Princess Tutu would count. Asuka starts off the series with a high-and-mighty attitude and eventually breaks down when Shinji turns out to be better, plus the emotional trauma she recieves in fights. Autor generally comes off as a snob, lording his grand knowledge about the Story-Spinning powers over another character, only to be humiliated when the character is "chosen" over him and he turns out to have no trace of the powers in question.
  • January 14, 2008
    Unknown Troper
    Dr Dedman: Asuka is a subverted version of this. In her both her first story and "The Day Tokyo 3 stood still" she is set up for such a fall. In the first one, everyone pulls together and she learns no "lesson". In the second she makes a fool of herself trying to take charge, until the real battle. Then she starts giving orders that make sense and takes over (and the whole Aesop is just ignored). After she snaps out of her Mind Rape induced coma (when they "kinda" play it straight), she's just as cocky as she ever was (actually even more).

    It's also worth noting that while damage to her pride is one part of Asuka's downward spiral. The other part is the recognition that Shinji is the "chosen one" (most of her latter "talks" with Rei). It's bad enough to go back to being ordinary when the world could end tomorrow. It's worse when you know the guy with the fate of the world on his shoulders doesn't want the job.
  • January 14, 2008
    Fanra
    The Ancient Greeks considered Hubris (exaggerated self pride or self-confidence (overbearing pride)) to be the greatest sin of the ancient Greek world. Thus, there are quite a number of stories about how those guilty of it are punished, either by circumstances or by the gods. Although circumstances are generally also considered caused by the gods.

    Which makes this one of The Oldest Ones In The Book.
  • January 14, 2008
    Unknown Troper
    IIRC, one haughty version of The Libby got Covered In Gunge. Actually I think the original Libby did as well.
  • January 14, 2008
    Narvi
    Aloof Big Brother is a subtrope.
  • January 15, 2008
    Arivne
  • January 15, 2008
    Air of Mystery
    Yes, Fanra, but the Olympians were pricks.
  • January 15, 2008
    Unknown Troper
    Not limited to anime: This happened to Paige in Degrassi: The Next Generation.
  • January 15, 2008
    Sir Psycho Sexy
    Hiei from Yu Yu Hakusho comes to mind...

    And I vote for Pride Goeth Before A Fall.
  • January 15, 2008
    VampireBuddha
    Related to Fallen Princess.
  • January 15, 2008
    Gemmifer
    I like Pride Goeth Before A Fall too. It sounds just as old as that idea seems to be.
  • January 15, 2008
    RobertBingham
    Pride Before A Fall. We have this.
  • January 15, 2008
    Gemmifer
    Oh, yes. How do I discard a discussion?
  • January 15, 2008
    Unknown Troper
    Dr Dedman: Uh, no while the name is used elsewhere. This is a different trope. "Pride Before" is the story revolving around a character who is brought low right off the bat. This seams to be like Break The Cutie, something that happens to other characters as a sort of subplot. This is an episode of in a larger story, pride before IS the story.
  • January 15, 2008
    Shadowen
    Disc World's characters seem immune to this--those who deserve their pride, anyway. Granny Weatherwax? Couldn't dent her pride with a sledge. Vetinari? Not so much prideful as he is very aware of exactly how good he is. Even youths who are, perhaps, excessively prideful still end up, after An Aesop, with slightly more pride than they might in fact have earned.
  • January 15, 2008
    Fanra
    The thing about Discworld, is that yes, if you deserve your pride you are fine. If you don't however, you will be shown to be an idiot. Hubris is not just pride, but excessive pride, pride you don't deserve or without good judgment.

    For example, the Spartans are justified if in their pride they feel they are the best warriors on the planet and each is worth 100 normal warriors. It would be hubris for them, however, to say they could never be defeated in battle, ever. And in fact they were defeated. Of course, they did kill more than 100 enemy for each of them but they still lost.

    Truth In Television would be the example of a US officer meeting with his North Vietnamese counterpart after the war. He mentions that the Vietnamese never won a military battle against the USA. The Vietnamese officer replies that is true, but it is also irrelevant. Indeed, the Tet Offensive was a major military loss for the North Vietnamese. It also was the beginning of the end for the USA.
  • January 15, 2008
    Fanra
    Additional Truth In Television can be see with the Bush Administration's policies toward Iraq, especially for the first few years.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=nymra817