Created By: capnKate on August 12, 2010
Troped

Come With Me If You Want To Live

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Do We Have This One? and Is This Tropable?

Alice has found herself in a sticky situation. Maybe the Mooks are closing in, or even worse, The Big Bad himself. Enter Bob with a speedy getaway at the ready. However, Bob has to be sure that Alice understands her options, so he utters the words "Come with me if you want to live."

  • One of the Iconic lines from the Terminator movies
  • Achmed says this to Rhapsody in the book Rhapsody
Community Feedback Replies: 19
  • August 12, 2010
    BelieveItOrNot
    It sounds like the trope is detailing an instance when a character is literally saying that line? If that's the case, then I don't think this is tropable. There's not enough examples for its use.
  • August 12, 2010
    Vree
    ^ Agreed. I guess this could could be made into a subtrope of the Herald though, similar to Harbinger Of Impending Doom, for the Herald who drags the character into adventure by saving them from becoming a victim of The Call Knows Where You Live.
  • August 12, 2010
    berr
    Sort of like the Long Lost Relative who saves you from a nasty death at the hands of an invading army or whatever?
  • August 13, 2010
    Arivne
    Film
    • The Mask. As Stanley Ipkiss is fleeing the police, Peggy Brandt pulls up in her car and tells him to get in.

    Tabletop RPG
    • Shadowrun adventure Harlequin. The PCs are on a mission when things go haywire, with corporate police closing in from all directions. A van pulls up beside them and the driver says "So, are you guys going my way or would you rather stick around and wait for your new friends to catch up with us?"
  • August 13, 2010
    Korodzik
    Homestuck. Rose Lalonde's walkthrough for the game Sburb informs the reader that following the walkthrough carefully will be needed for actual survival of the players, even outright stating: "If you want to live, you will do as I instruct".
  • August 13, 2010
    Unknown Troper
    Spoofed on Community, during the paintball war episode. "Come with me if you don't want paint on your clothes."
  • August 13, 2010
    Micah
    I think the trope here is "vehicle unexpectedly pulls up during a fight or chase scene with a screech of tires to rescue one of the sides." I've seen it often enough to get into the habit of saying "come with me if you want to live" whenever it shows up in something I'm watching with my girlfriend...

    • The Middleman has an example complete with the iconic line in its Mirror Universe episode -- mirror-Pip makes his first appearance rescuing Wendy from the mirrored version of her apartment like this.
  • August 13, 2010
    BelieveItOrNot
    Ok, I can see that one. The line there, however, is almost always a simple "Get In"
  • August 13, 2010
    capnKate
    So maybe Needs A Better Title or maybe needs to be more general? And I definitely agree with it being a subtrope of The Call Knows Where You Live
  • August 13, 2010
    BelieveItOrNot
    I don't know. The title is good enough, seems to make sense, definitely not boring. It seems like you have a good amount of examples coming in so far, so hopefully it keeps up.
  • August 15, 2010
    berr
    Thirded Come With Me If You Want To Live.

    It could be a trope whose Ur example is "car pulls up and unexpected rescuer inside" BUT! examples need not be limited to that. In a swashbuckler, for example, it might be a guy on a horse who the audience doesn't expect.

    This is also a classic setup for introducing a new character who you aren't sure of their loyalties at first (half the time these days, it's a double agent).

    Heck, even Aragorn in the inn (Lotr) might qualify.
  • August 15, 2010
    GuesssWho
    I seem to remember the Doctor introducing himself with "Run!" at one point . . .
  • August 15, 2010
    prinzenick
    One of the CGI Casper movies makes a Shout Out to this line, but i'm not sure which one.
  • August 15, 2010
    AspieForPeace
    Perhaps as a Shout Out to the Terminator movies, when Fox released The Sarah Connor Chronicles, an android(played by the stunning Summer Glau) did something like this.
  • August 16, 2010
    randomsurfer
    ^Since the show is literally based on The Terminator series it's a bit more than a Shout Out, more a Mythology Gag since it comes up in every film.

    I remember seeing something on TV do this recently complete with "come with me if you want to live" line, but I don't remember what. Sorry, that's not much of an example.
  • August 16, 2010
    Darkmane
    Most examples of these are a Shout Out to Terminator; so I'm of half-minds as to whether or not it is tropable.

    There are more examples, of course:

  • August 16, 2010
    berr
    The trope name is just a Shout Out; examples (IMHO) should include any time an unexpected rescuer (with better access to a vehicle, or knowledge of an escape route) cuts short a chase or an ambush.

    This is distinguished from The Cavalry because the unexpected rescuer is (a) introduced in this fashion, having only been briefly seen or mentioned before; (b) helping the hero escape, not reinforcing the hero; (b) generally introduced in this fashion in order to keep the audience guessing left open ended if he's a good guy, bad guy or something in between.

    So this is quite a universal trope. It could be a guy on a horse, on a motorcycle, a wilderness expert, or a made-of-iron cyborg Meat Shield.
  • August 16, 2010
    berr
    In addition to Aragorn, wilderness expert "come with me if you want to live" rescues include:

    • The Mohican rescue in Last Of The Mohicans. "We're movin' outta here, fast. Unless you all's'd rather wait for the next Huron war party to come along."

    Fresh example:

    • Saito in Inception pulls up in car in Kenya and rescues Dom from the absurdly vindictive assassins from a rival corporation. Saito is also a former victim of Dom's mind-hacking who turned the tables on Dom and hired him, so this is a "friend or foe" example.
      Dom: You had me tracked too?
      Saito: Protecting my investment.
  • August 17, 2010
    berr
    So, just curious, do y'all think this should be limited to the actual expression, or the more general trope?
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