Created By: StarSong212 on October 23, 2017 Last Edited By: StarSong212 on November 29, 2017
Troped

Druidic Sickle

Pagan clergy, especially druids, carry knives with crescent-shaped blades.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
trope
Devotees of old gods often carry small sickles, which are reminiscent of both plants (sickles were originally farming tools) and the moon (the blades are crescent-shaped). They can be seen as weapons, or simply as tools that happen to come in handy for self-defense. These knives are especially common among priestesses; a male character with such a weapon is, however, more likely to be explicitly called a druid, rather than simply a pagan priest.

A sub-trope of Weapon of Choice.


I hereby consecrate these examples in the names of the Lord and Lady:

Comic Strips
  • Astérix features the druid Getafix, who uses a golden sickle to gather potion ingredients. This is apparently especially important for the gathering of mistletoe, the only non-secret ingredient of the druid's magic potion: mistletoe must be harvested with a golden sickle, or it loses all its magical powers. Getafix's sickle breaks in Asterix and the Golden Sickle, forcing Asterix and Obelix to go on a quest to find a new one in time for the upcoming gathering of druids, since Getafix couldn't bear the shame of being the only sickle-less druid present.

Literature

Tabletop Games
  • In Dungeons And Dragons 3rd Edition, the Druid class has a very short list of weapon proficiencies, including the sickle alongside simple weapons like knives, staves and smaller spears. The only martial weapon with which they are proficient is the scimitar, which is vaguely sickle-like in shape.
  • Advanced Dungeons & Dragons: Druids use mistletoe as a component of casting their spells. They have to cut a full year's supply on Midsummer's Eve with a sickle made of silver or gold.
  • Lini, the iconic Druid from Pathfinder, wields a sickle.

Real Life
  • Somewhat Truth in Television; many pagan religions include a sickle-shaped work knife called a boline as part of the ritual tools, though it's not generally considered a weapon.
Community Feedback Replies: 18
  • October 23, 2017
    Zuxtron
    Crescent-shaped knives are called sickles. How about Druidic Sickle or Pagan Sickle for the trope name?

    • In 'Asterix'' , the village's druid Getafix uses a golden sickle to gather ingredients to make the magic potion. One comic, "Asterix and the Golden Sickle" has the heroes embark on an adventure to get him a new one after it breaks.

    • The Lone Druid in Dota 2 carries a sickle, although he doesn't wield it in combat.
  • October 23, 2017
    Theriocephalus
    I second changing the name. My first impression was that this was a trope about the actual crescent moon.
  • October 23, 2017
    KTera
    Sickles are generally used to harvest plants, which might explain why they're associated with druids and priestesses of Mother Nature. Also, the sickle in the Communist Hammer And Sickle represents farmers and agricultural workers (the hammer represents industrial workers), and The Grim Reaper is sometimes depicted with a sickle instead of a Sinister Scythe.
  • October 23, 2017
    ScroogeMacDuck
    Needs A Better Name. While "Crescent Moon Blade" could be a valid trope name, it would be so for the very idea of crescent-shaped blades, and does not at all reflect the proposed trope's focus on druids and other such pagan priests being the ones to wield them. Whether or not this hypothetical trope would be People Sit On Chair is debatable, but that's entirely besides the point.

    I second the suggestion of Druidic Sickle as the new name.
  • October 23, 2017
    Exxolon
    Real Life: Followers of Wicca often use a sickle shaped knife called a Boline in rituals.
  • October 23, 2017
    StarSong212
    Suggestions have been implemented, thanks!
  • October 24, 2017
    Arivne
  • November 27, 2017
    Arivne
    Tabletop Games
    • Advanced Dungeons And Dragons. Druids use mistletoe as a component of casting their spells. They have to cut a full year's supply on Midsummer's Eve with a sickle made of silver or gold.
  • October 24, 2017
    Theriocephalus
    An expansion on the Asterix example, which is kind of bare bones right now:

    • Asterix features the druid Getafix, who uses a golden sickle to gather potion ingredients. This is apparently especially important for the gathering of mistletoe, the only non-secret ingredient of the druid's magic potion: mistletoe must be harvested with a golden sickle, or it loses all its magical powers. Getafix's sickle breaks in Asterix and the Golden Sickle, forcing Asterix and Obelix to go on a quest to find a new one in time for the upcoming gathering of druids, since Getafix could't bear the shame of being the only sickle-less druid present.
  • October 24, 2017
    StarSong212
    Updates added, thanks!
  • October 24, 2017
    Theriocephalus
    Example section:
    • Italicized work titles.
    • Linked the D&D and Pathfinder examples to the works in question.
  • October 24, 2017
    Generality
    A related symbol is the crook and flail carried by Ancient Egyptian royalty. The flail, like the sickle, is a tool for harvesting grain, whereas the crook represents the caring of livestock.
  • October 25, 2017
    StarSong212
    Considering hatting this and calling it ready to consider launching, but I feel like I need more examples. Anyone got any?
  • November 26, 2017
    Darth_Marth
    • World Of Warcraft has the Scythe of Elune, a powerful Druidic weapon that was created from a fang of the Wolf God Goldrinn. Misuse of it's power inadvertently created the Worgen race. It became obtainable by players in the Legion expansion, as the artifact weapon for Balance-specialization Druids.
  • November 26, 2017
    Prime32
    • In Dungeons And Dragons 3rd Edition, the Druid class has a very short list of weapon proficiencies, including the sickle alongside simple weapons like knives, staves and smaller spears. The only martial weapon with which they are proficient is the scimitar, which is vaguely sickle-like in shape.
  • November 27, 2017
    Theriocephalus
    Grammar fix — could't -> couldn't in the Asterix example.
  • November 27, 2017
    StarSong212
    Thanks for the fix, Theriocephalus! Adding Prime 32's edit now.
  • November 29, 2017
    StarSong212
    Great news, everyone! We now have five hats. Launching this trope now!
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