Created By: Octagon8 on July 12, 2011 Last Edited By: Octagon8 on August 14, 2011
Troped

Solemn Ending Theme

A solemn piece of music accompanying the credits

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Formerly Solemn Credits Song.

Rolling Updates, No Launching Please, Needs a Better Description

A slow-paced, emotional, solemn song played during the credits. Common especially in anime and video games.

In most cases pensive, retrospective or sad. Often so melodramatic that it falls into Narm territory.

Very often in Japanese.

Since except in some cases the soundtrack usually supports the temper of the ending, this is often a sign of a bittersweet or Downer Ending, except in anime, where the opening theme is usually more exciting in order to build excitement for the coming show while the closing theme is more somber to provide a resting period or moment of reflection between shows.

Preferably provide links to the song (Youtube or otherwise) when adding examples. Take care, linked credits videos might obviously contain ending spoilers; to prevent this, it would be optimal to link the song without the credits video or mark credits videos as such.

Examples:

Anime

Film

Live-Action TV

Professional Wrestling
  • When Mick Foley first appeared as "Mankind" in the WWF, he had two themes, an entrance theme and a different, more solemn exit theme that played when he won a match.

Video Games
Community Feedback Replies: 26
  • July 12, 2011
    LeeM
    Wolfs Rain, "Gravity". Sung in English by Maaya Sakamoto.
  • July 12, 2011
    revolverzanbolt
    Baccano!, "Calling". Extremely noticeable in contrast to the jazzy upbeat opening, "Guns & Roses".
  • July 13, 2011
    goodtimesfreegrog
  • July 13, 2011
    AgProv

    is there a sub-theme where a show that normally has a jolly theme tune switches to something sounding like a funeral dirge, or a dirge-paced version of the usual theme, if a regular character is killed off or if some sort of natural disaster occurs to prune the wages bill for the cast? The death of Adric in "Dr Who" maybe.

    Or (unrelated)the two occassions in "Red Dwarf" where "Fun in the Sun" is subverted - once as a Western theme at the end of the Wild West episode, and once on Hammond Organ in tribute to Rimmer's singular taste in music.
  • July 13, 2011
    Octagon8
    @Ag Prov: Sounds like Dark Reprise.
  • July 20, 2011
    LeeM
    Gerry Anderson's UFO has a fast upbeat opening theme, but closes with an ominous atmospheric piece.
  • July 20, 2011
    Tiiba
    Excel Saga ends with a parody. The last episode parodies the parody.
  • July 27, 2011
    terrafox
    • Neon Genesis Evangelion features Frank Sinatra's "Fly Me to the Moon" sang by several different female vocalists, each with her own unique voice style.
    • Gasaraki features one
    • Metal Gear Solid features one that with a Native American style to it
    • Outlaw Star features this for the first 13 episodes, and a slightly less solemn one for the rest of the series.
    • The 3rd season of Sailor Moon featured this in the original Japanese, it was changed to an instrumental version of the US opening credit song when it ran in syndication on Cartoon Network.
  • July 27, 2011
    dalexterminate
    In the Doctor Who episode Earthshock, there is no music over the credits dur to Adric's death.
  • July 28, 2011
    Octagon8
    Not An Example, I think...
  • August 1, 2011
    lamoxlamae
    This could use the examples being split into categories (Anime, Film, ect). I also think that linking each end theme would be very appropriate and interesting to readers.

    By the way, here are links for Outlaw Star's Season one end theme and Season two's end theme. Yes, both far more somber than the opening theme.

    --Video Games--

    --Anime--

  • August 1, 2011
    TBTabby
  • August 2, 2011
    Koveras
    "May It Be" for the first Lord Of The Rings movie.
  • August 2, 2011
    pinkdalek
    Metal Gear Solid's isn't Native American (that would actually make sense). It's in Irish Gaelic.

    Also, almost all the Metal Gear ending songs are like this, with the exception of "Can't Say Goodbye To Yesterday" and the one to the original Metal Gear (which was ridiculously peppy). "Way To Fall" is a mournful alt-rock ballad, "The Best Is Yet To Come" is a Gaelic ballad and "Calling To The Night", "Here's To You" and to a slightly lesser extent "Heaven's Divide" are all super-melodramatic Power Ballads.
  • August 4, 2011
    SunnyV

  • August 4, 2011
    ScanVisor
    Neither of the exammples from Final Fantasy are sad: YMMV on melodrama.
  • August 4, 2011
    DarkConfidant
    A partial example: Wild Arms 3 has a fairly sad theme that plays whenever you quit the game. The credit theme is a softer, more solemn theme of the opening theme, though possibly not solemn enough to qualify for this trope.

    Legend of Legaia plays this trope far straighter.
  • August 4, 2011
    Twentington
  • August 4, 2011
    Acebrock
    Often a sign of a bittersweet or Downer Ending.
  • August 6, 2011
    lamoxlamae
    (continuing Acebrocks's train of thought)

    ... when not used in Anime. In anime the opening theme is usually more exciting in order to build excitement for the coming show while the closing theme is more somber to provide a resting period or moment of reflection between shows.
  • August 6, 2011
    LobsterMagnus
    The ending theme of Queen Millennia. True, the title theme isn't exactly Hard Rock either, but the ending seems to be a bit more solemn.
  • August 7, 2011
    randomsurfer
    When Mick Foley first appeared as Mankind in the WWF he had two themes, an entrance theme and a different, more solemn exit theme that played when he won a match.
  • August 7, 2011
    terrafox
    Looking good, time for a hat.
  • August 7, 2011
    Falco
  • August 13, 2011
    Octagon8
    A better description is the only thing this needs before it can be launched.
  • August 14, 2011
    GameChainsaw
    Conkers Bad Fur Day had an incredibly sombre, mature ending theme to go with its equally disquieting ending. Given the goofy nature of the game, this also qualifies as Mood Whiplash.

    EDIT: I'd try rewriting it but the description seems perfectly serviceable to me.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=ls0lulwxq385fcsk91vk2hj2