Created By: carla on October 6, 2010 Last Edited By: carla on October 21, 2010
Troped

No Eye Contact No Magic

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope

Note: Used to be Eye Contact Magic. Definition changed! Please see comments. -Carla.

Laconic: If they can't see you, they can't hex you.

Alternate Names: Never Look Eye, Eye Cast A Spell, No Eye in Magic (3). Please vote which one you think is best!

Indexes: Eye Tropes, Magic and Powers.

Tags: Could Use A Better Title, Could Use More Examples, No Launching Please, Rolling Updates.

A quick search of this site will let you know that eyes are the windows to the soul. Well, sometimes in a Fantasy setting, these windows not only let outsiders see inside, they can also be wide open and allow power or information in or out.

Wait, what?

Basically, certain magic requires the caster to make eye contact with the object of the spell in order to work properly.

This is because spells that produce significant effects on thoughts, individuality and/or physicality of people or objects (like Mind Control, Mind Reading, Evil Eyes or Petrification) can involve a massive amount of power that must be applied in a very controlled manner. As luck would have it, the optic nerve is pretty much a direct pathway to the brain, so these spells can be better focused and more effectively received through the eyes. This means, some magic is more powerful if you're looking directly at your target; in fact, some magic might not work at all if you're not looking at your target. (This is taken to its logical extreme with Eye Beams).

Because of this line-of-sight requirement, the object of the spell can usually avoid it by hiding behind a conveniently-available large object, covering him/herself with something, or simply not looking back at the caster. Blind characters will sometimes be immune to this, depending on the nature of the spell (for example, the power of a Gorgon or Basilisk requires the victim to see the attacker, so blind people will be immune). Following the same idea, indirect eye contact is usually considered safe; that is, these spells generally don't work via reflection.

That's where this trope comes in, when someone successfully avoids getting hit with eye contact magic by avoiding eye contact, or when it's specifically stated a certain characteristic of the recipient can render this type of magic useless on him, regardless of how directly or intensely the caster is looking at them.


Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • In Bleach, Kaname Tousen, being blind, is immune to Aizen's Perfect Hypnosis, and when this is brought up, reveals he's been working for Aizen the whole time.
  • Code Geass is a subversion. Many Geass, each with different abilities, work through eye contact, but it doesn't need to be direct-- for example, at one point Lelouch uses dozens of small mirrors to catch a glimpse of his target's eyes. Also Jeremiah Gottwald's own geass allows him to cancel other geass effects within a certain range and will reverse any geass effect used on him, independent of eye contact.
  • In Darker Than Black's second season, one Contractor, August 7, is a Reality Warper who can pretty much do anything so long as he's looking at you. He's not very competent though, and is defeated in about 5 minutes or less after the Anti-Hero just throws his Badass Longcoat over August's head and electrocutes him.
  • In Saint Seiya, Perseus Algol exhibits a similar petrification power to the mythical Medusa-- not through his own eyes, but through the image of Medusa in his shield. This power could affect his victims through cloth or blindfolds, because it acted directly on the retina. The recipient could protect themselves with Dragon cloth's shield, however, and it doesn't work on the blind either.

Film - Live Action
  • An inversion: Kel Mitchell's character in Mystery Men claims he can turn invisible, but only if no one can see him, a power most of the others think he's imagined until he uses it to get past a magical automated turret.
  • In Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief, Percy, Grover and Annabeth encounter the actual Medusa from Greek Myth. Percy uses an iPod Touch to glimpse ahead before turning corners because reflection is the only safe way to see Medusa without getting Petrified.

Literature
  • In the Anita Blake series, vampires' mind magic works better with eye contact. One rather important thing Anita found out early was that this scales with a vampire's power: a young vampire can't get her with or without, but with master vampire, it took her from "I'm not even trying here" to Mind Rape in nothing flat. A good chunk of the introduction to the series is Anita describing herself trying to look tough while at the same time avoiding the vampires' eyes, so as to keep out of their magical control.
  • Artemis Fowl has the fairy 'Mesmer' ability, which - with direct eye-contact - allows the fairy to hypnotize and control a person. Reflective lenses such as shades will block it (and, on one memorable occasion, mirror-surfaced contact-lenses are used to covertly block a Mesmer), but it CAN be conveyed across video-link, albeit at a significant power-loss. (Strong-willed people can shrug off Mesmer if it's by video. With direct eye-contact, the best you can hope for is to resist violently enough to die rather than carry out the commands of your fairy master).
  • In The Dresden Files, when a wizard looks directly into someone else's eyes, they can see the essence of that person's soul. This ability is called a "soulgaze." Unfortunately, this is an automatic effect, once it's activated it can't be stopped, and since it's eye-to-eye it's very much reciprocal, so the other person sees into the wizard's soul as well. Harry himself spends most of the series avoiding direct eye contact with people, unless he has a good reason for it.
  • Some of the spells in the Harry Potter series are like this. For example, in Book 1, the main villain put a spell on Harry's broom during a Quidditch game, to make him fall off. Hermione stops the spell by creating a fire, which startles him into breaking eye contact with Harry.
    • In The Chamber Of Secrets the basilisk can kill someone just by looking at them in the eye - fortunately the only people we see who have encountered it manage to not quite look it in the eye: they see it in a reflection, or through a camera lens, or in a mirror, so it doesn't quite kill them.
    • There is also Legilimency, the ability to extract emotions and memories from a person's mind, which usually works via eye-to-eye contact. Dumbledore, Snape and Voldemort are expert Legilimens, and scattered through the series (even before we knew what Legilimency was) we can find instances where Harry felt they could "read his mind." Almost a "missed" example, but once or twice Harry does look away from their gaze; initially the reader would just assume he felt uncomfortable under scrutiny-- now we know better.
  • Shamer abilities in the Shamer Chronicles series of books.
  • Played with in The Wheel of Time series: Magic is done by weaving together tendrils of power into complex forms. It's been directly stated that if you can't see the object you're working magic on, you can't put a "weave" (spell) on it. However, there have been cases of people using magic in considerable, though perhaps not complete, darkness.

Live Action TV
  • Inverted in Doctor Who with the Weeping Angels, which are only dangerous if you don't look at them. A later Retcon plays it straight, though, and they can also kill you if you look them straight in the eye.

Mythology and Religion
  • In the Perseus myth, Perseus looked at the Gorgon through a mirror so he didn't get killed by looking directly at it.

Tabletop RPG
  • Standard for most Dungeons & Dragons monsters with "gaze weapons", such as the basilisk, vampire, catoblepas, floating eye, medusa and spirit naga.

Western Animation
  • In Gargoyles' "City of Stone", Demona casts a spell that specifically affects only people who have seen it; Hudson quickly notes that the spell does not work on the blind.
Community Feedback Replies: 75
  • October 6, 2010
    AmazinglyEnough
    When Kaa hypnotizes Mowgli in The Jungle Book?
  • October 6, 2010
    evilneko
    Code Geass has this in spades.
  • October 7, 2010
    Arivne
    The main description should probably say something about the attacker making eye contact with the victim, the way the title, Laconic version and examples do.

    Tabletop RPG
    • Standard for most Dungeons And Dragons monsters with "gaze weapons", such as the basilisk, vampire, catoblepas, floating eye, medusa and spirit naga.
  • October 7, 2010
    hbi2k
    The description is a little vague on whether this refers to magic that requires the caster to merely look at the object of the spell or magic that requires direct eye contact between the caster and the victim or both. In other words, to count as this trope, does the caster merely need to look at you, or do you also need to look back?

    So many magic systems require line-of-sight that it would probably be easier to list exceptions. The latter is less common and therefore more tropable.
  • October 7, 2010
    Earnest
    In Vampire The Requiem and Masquerade, the vampire discipline of Dominate requires eye contact. Mirror shades don't stop this. Interestingly, one bloodline of vampires, the Baddacelli, are cursed with blindness... but they can potentially use Dominate despite lacking eyes (if the ST is willing, of course).
  • October 7, 2010
    carla
    @Amazingly Enough-- is that the disney version, the original book? i need to know whether i should list it under western animation or literature.

    @evilneko-- added, but any particular examples? the more specific, the better.

    @whoever wrote the D&D example-- sorry, i hit the edit button by mistake. next time i'll try something else to get the markup. anyway, i've added the words "eye contact" into the description, let me know if that's better.
  • October 7, 2010
    carla
    @hbi2k-- maybe this a supertrope. i was trying to make this one wider than "the recipient needs to look back at the caster" because most of those already have their own tropes.

    i meant to distinguish these from spells that simply need direction, like creating a hurricane or attacking with magical fire. yes, you need to be looking at your target to direct the magical fire where you want it to go, but you don't need to be looking at the target to create the fire in the first place. this way it takes into account stuff that may be used on objects, too.

    basically, line-of-sight is required for the person to do the spell in the first place: if they're not looking at their target, any amount of chanting and wand-waving produces nothing. maybe i could just have a section in the description that explains "this trope includes spells/situations such as:" where i put in all these tropes, and recommend that people don't add examples of those in this trope, but take them to the respective subtropes. would that work?
  • October 7, 2010
    Starry-Eyed
    Shamer abilities in the Shamer Chronicles series of books.
  • October 7, 2010
    evilneko
    Re: Code Geass. Where do we start? The plot essentially revolves around the main character obtaining this power and what he does with it. Specifically, he gains the ability to Mind Control someone by making eye contact and speaking a command.
  • October 7, 2010
    Roxor
    Magic in Gargoyles requires the subject to be able to see the caster. The four-parter "City of Stone" has Hudson explicitly state that magic does not work on the blind.
  • October 7, 2010
    randomsurfer
    @Carla: actually if you click edit and copy the markup, if you click the pencil again to close the editing window instead of "enter changes" you won't overwrite the original poster's name. It's like cancelling the edit.
  • October 7, 2010
    Vree
    The window to the soul trope is Eyes Never Lie, perhaps it can be potholed.
  • October 7, 2010
    RedWren
    literature

    • In the Anita Blake series, vampires' mind magic works better with eye contact. One rather important thing Anita found out early was that this scales with a vampire's power: a young vampire can't get her with or without, but with master vampire, it took her from "I'm not even trying here" to Mind Rape in nothing flat.
  • October 7, 2010
    carla
    added roxor's example.

    @randomsurfer-- awesome, i didn't know that. first time YKTTW-ing and all. thanks for letting me know!

    @vree-- thanks, i've added the pothole.

    anyone have any comments re: my last reply? i'm debating whether i should narrow this to "spells that require the caster and the recipient to be looking at each other" because the current span is too wide, or whether i should just stick to this to this description. perhaps make it clearer? is the idea coming across right?
  • October 7, 2010
    Jordan
    In Darker Than Black's second season, one Contractor, August 7, is a Reality Warper who can pretty much do anything so long as he's looking at you. He's not very competent though, and is defeated in about 5 minutes or less after the Anti Hero just throws his Badass Longcoat over August's head and electrocutes him.
  • October 7, 2010
    RedWren
    I like the eye contact phrasing. It emphasizes that it doesn't need to be an intentional decision to look at the character, but just their eyes meeting. The first parenthetical statement afterward is useless, though, and if that's what you mean actually confuses the meaning a bit.
  • October 7, 2010
    Stratadrake
    I'm not convinced if Gargoyles in general is an example, because in "City of Stone", Demona's spell was explicitly designed to affect those who saw it on the broadcast.
  • October 7, 2010
    carla
    added redwren's and jordan's examples.

    @redwren-- the thing about leaving it at "eye contact," as pointed out in previous comments, is that it's not very specific. two people looking at each other is eye contact. me looking at a broom is eye contact, too. i was originally going for the more general meaning-- the caster needs to be looking at something/someone, independent of whether the something/someone be looking back. but if anyone thinks it could be redefined to make it better, i'm open to suggestions. we could just rework the examples.

    @stratadrake-- i'm not familiar with Gargoyles, but now that you mention it, it seems more like an inversion, doesn't it? it's not the caster that has to look at the recipient for it to work, it's the recipient that has to be able to see the caster.
  • October 7, 2010
    carla
    reworked the description a bit. let me know if that's any better. haven't sorted out any of the examples yet.

    also, if you can think of more subtropes, let me know so i can add them to the list.
  • October 7, 2010
    RedWren
    @ carla If you're worried about that, you could rewrite it to use something like "The mage and the victim's eyes have to meet."
  • October 8, 2010
    henke37
    I once heard a story about some smart woman who dodged some curse by using some reflective cookware. Maybe a note about how indirect contact is usually considered safe? Then again, we have tv broadcast mind control plots.
  • October 8, 2010
    Unknown Troper
    Naruto has two good examples with Tsukuyomi, an illusion that (usually) requires eye contact with the caster), and Amaterasu, a fire attack that can hit anything on the user's field of vision.
  • October 8, 2010
    Stratadrake
    @Carla: The reason I'm questioning Gargoyles is because this was explicitly how that specific spell was designed, not necessarily a requirement for magic in general. It's still an inversion, but needs to be rephrased.
  • October 8, 2010
    carla
    @redwren-- but that's the thing, as i see it, it's not necessary for the mage to meet someone's eyes. the trope is more general than that, it can be one-sided. like, say i can do a spell to make things glittery, but i have to be looking at whatever i'm trying to charm. i look at a trash can, focus on it, and it starts to glitter. if i'm not looking at the trash can, i can't make the trash can glitter at all. the trash can can't look back at me because, well, it doesn't have eyes; so it's not eye-to-eye. get it? of course, spells that require eye-to-eye contact (like mind control and such) fall under this trope as well, but this one is basically "eye-to-something". i don't know if that's coming across in the trope definition...

    @henke37-- good idea! i'll add that in somewhere.

    @unknown-- i haven't read any Naruto in like a year or so, but aren't tsukuyomi and amaterasu more about the sharingan than about the person? even if they do require eye contact, i think those would probably fall under Evil Eye, as the eyes themselves are the ones that give the person that ability.

    @stratadrake-- oh, i see what you mean. yeah, i'll work out the example so that it reads better.
  • October 8, 2010
    carla
    added some stuff to the description, rewrote a couple of examples. took out the Code Geass example because it falls under Mind Control. the Vampire The Requiem example sounds a lot like mind control as well, but i'm not familiar enough with the work to be sure, and i don't see it listed in the Brainwashed page either. it it shouldn't go here, let me know!
  • October 9, 2010
    carla
    removed Code Geass again. remember, guys, examples of Brainwashing go in that trope only, no use repeating it in both tropes if Brainwashing is a subtrope of this one.
  • October 10, 2010
    randomsurfer
    • In The Chamber Of Secrets the basilisk can kill someone just by looking at them in the eye - fortunately the only people we see who have encountered it manage to not quite look it in the eye - they see it in a reflection, or through a camera lens, or in a mirror, so it doesn't quite kill them.
    • In the Perseus myth, Perseus looked at the Gorgon through a mirror so he didn't get killed by looking directly at it.
  • October 10, 2010
    Game_Fan
    • The Evil Eye ritual from the GURPS: Thaumatology requires eye contact to function. If you aren't making eye contact when the effect goes off very bad things happen.
      • The "Vision Based" enhancement lets any attack power work though eye contact. It's counted as an advantage over normal attack because it bypasses most defenses.
  • October 10, 2010
    carla
    i've added the Harry Potter example. the medusa example should go under Petrification (it's already there, actually) so i didn't add it here.

    @game_fan-- i'm not familiar with GURPS so i got a little confused... is it the eye itself that gives them this ability? because if it is, the example should go under Evil Eye, not here.
  • October 10, 2010
    evilneko
    If Lelouch's ability counts as Brainwashing, then how about that of Charles zi Britannia: He can freely alter an individual's memories at will, and even seal the ability of another Geass user as well as physical abilities such as eyesight.
  • October 11, 2010
    BlackDragon
    Artemis Fowl has the fairy 'Mesmer' ability, which - with direct eye-contact - allows the fairy to hypnotize and control a person. Reflective lenses such as shades will block it (and, on one memorable occasion, mirror-surfaced contact-lenses are used to covertly block a Mesmer), but it CAN be conveyed across video-link, albeit at a significant power-loss. (Strong-willed people can shrug off Mesmer if it's by video. With direct eye-contact, the best you can hope for is to resist violently enough to die rather than carry out the commands of your fairy master.)
  • October 11, 2010
    carla
    i've added evilneko's example, although as i'm not familiar with the series, i have to ask: does this charles person do this with a geass? because this geass thing is starting to sound more like Evil Eye than this trope (and i see that it's listed in the Evil Eye page-- at least lelouch's is). heh, i totally have to watch this series.

    the mesmer in Artemis Fowl is most definitely Brainwashing, though, so i didn't add it here.

    LOL, maybe i should make this trope about instances where people manage to dodge eye contact magic somehow, that way most of these examples would fit! how's that sound, guys? (and what name would you give to a trope like that? would Eye Contact Magic still work if i redefine the trope?)
  • October 11, 2010
    randomsurfer
    Never Look Eye? (After Mr. Miyagi's lesson in The Karate Kid, "Always look eye.")
  • October 11, 2010
    RedWren
  • October 11, 2010
    carla
    ok, i've switched the description around to fit the new definition, as well as the laconic! i also added some of the previously-left-out examples that now fit. there are a few of the old examples that i'm not sure about now, i don't know if they fit the new definition (avoiding eye contact magic). would be good if you guys could give me specific examples of magic being avoided, or if there are certain people the magic doesn't work on:

    also, let me know which of the two names you like better (or suggest new ones!).
  • October 11, 2010
    RedWren
    • In the Anita Blake series, a good chunk of the introduction to the series is Anita describing herself trying to look tough while at the same time avoiding the vampires' eyes, so as to keep out of their magical control.

    Indices: Eye Tropes, Magic And Powers
  • October 11, 2010
    Generality
    In The Wheel Of Time series, magic is done by weaving together tendrils of power into complex forms. If you can't see what you're doing, you can't use magic (although you can still sense other people doing it nearby). Darkness doesn't seem to be a hindrance.
  • October 11, 2010
    carla
    tweaked the description and laconic a bit more, added the indices, added the extra bit to the Anita Blake example.

    not sure if The Wheel Of Time applies, though; i'm not familiar with the work-- but it sounds less like the caster needing to see the object, and more like the caster needing to see the magic itself. am i understanding that correctly?
  • October 11, 2010
    evilneko
    I looked at the Evil Eye page. I don't think Emperor Charles's power (which is a geass, but then all the powers in Code Geass are called geass, whether or not the fit they traditional D&D definition of a geas) fits there, since it seems to cover mainly perception altering and clairvoyance, neither of which are included in Charles's geass.

    With the new definition I'm not sure Charles fits here anymore either, then again, at one point he does come face to face with Lelouch -- he has to avoid Lelouch's power somehow.

    On the other hand, the redefinition opens the door for yet another Code Geass character I think: Jeremiah Gottwald's geass allows him to cancel other geass effects within a certain range and will reverse any geass effect used on him.
  • October 12, 2010
    carla
    ^ jeremiah gottwald's ability works for the trope. i'll add it. if charles somehow avoided lelouch's geass by avoiding or undermining eye contact, let me know and i'll add it as well.
  • October 12, 2010
    RawPower
    Why not call it Basilisk Power, like in Genius The Transgression?
  • October 12, 2010
    Stratadrake
    Basilisks are too closely associated with being Taken For Granite.
  • October 12, 2010
    Mozgwsloiku
    taken to its logical extreme with Eye Beams
  • October 12, 2010
    carla
    @Raw Power-- what Stratadrake said, and also because it's not about the power itself, but about blocking or avoiding that power.
  • October 12, 2010
    Generality
    Re the Wheel Of Time case: you need to see the object you're working magic on, at least until the spell is in place.
  • October 12, 2010
    carla
    @Generality-- interesting. but darkness doesn't affect it, you say? hmm, maybe i can count that as an aversion. (unless there are any specific cases where the spell was stopped by covering or removing the object?)
  • October 13, 2010
    Stratadrake
    I was brainstorming for titles today. Eye Cast A Spell?
  • October 14, 2010
    carla
    haha, that's awesome, i love the pun! xD however, i'm not sure if it really fits now that the trope is focused more on the avoidance of the spell rather than the casting of the spell itself.

    i'll add it as a possibility anyway; everybody, please let me know which title you prefer!
  • October 14, 2010
    Stratadrake
    Too bad it couldn't be something like No Eye In Magic...
  • October 14, 2010
    carla
    ^ i like that one even better, so i ran for the thesaurus. No Eye In Sorcery? it doesn't have the same ring to it... (and one could argue that not all of the casters are sorcerers).
  • October 14, 2010
    Sligh
    Medusa Perseus attack from Saint Seya is quite like the mythological monster to.
  • October 14, 2010
    RedWren
    No Eye Can't Cast A Spell?

    No Eye In Spells?

    Though I'd say the obvious makes No Eye In Magic funnier, personally. Anyway, there isn't an eye in "magic"...
  • October 14, 2010
    ladyshadowphyre
    A missed example from the Potter World features the use of "Legimency", or mind-reading, which explicitly requires direct eye contact with the castor.
  • October 15, 2010
    carla
    ^ legilimency doesn't require eye contact, though. voldemort read harry's mind about sirius when he wasn't anywhere near harry.

    added the Saint Seiya example. i've also added No Eye In Magic to the list of alternative titles. three votes for it so far: stratadrake, redwren and myself. be sure to vote on which title you like better!
  • October 15, 2010
    stryper
    addendum to Dresden files. Butters was not so lucky.

  • October 15, 2010
    Generality
    The Wheel Of Time case is tricky. It's been stated directly that magic can't be done with one's eyes closed, but I'm pretty sure there have been cases of people using magic in considerable, though perhaps not complete, darkness. Either way, it's definitely in the rules that if you can't see something, you can't put a "weave" (spell) on it. (Although, you can "tie" a weave so that it lasts after you stop concentrating on it)
  • October 15, 2010
    Unknown Troper
    Why isn't this just called Eye Contact Magic? The extra negatives don't add anything and create the potential for confusion.
  • October 15, 2010
    carla
    @stryper-- i haven't gotten that far in the series. mind elaborating?

    @generality-- maybe i'll just add that verbatim, then. better to go for the safe explanation than end up confusing people.

    @unknown troper-- because it's more about avoiding eye contact spells than about the spells themselves. a few of us thought it was better if the title reflected that. but it's all open to discussion, hence why this hasn't been launched yet. =)
  • October 15, 2010
    SammiJ
    @ carla: Voldemort reading Harry's mind is a special case. In other circumstances, Legilimency requires eye contact.
  • October 15, 2010
    carla
    @sammij-- oh, of course! you're right, you're right. i keep forgetting that voldemort's link with harry is different. actually, reading it up on the HP lexicon, i think it might even be an example; there are several times over the series where harry actively avoids snape's eyes because he feels snape somehow knows what he's thinking. i'll add the example.
  • October 15, 2010
    Arutema
    • Human telepaths in Babylon 5 must have line-of-sight to a victim to use their powers.
  • October 16, 2010
    Aspie
    Blind characters will sometimes be immune to things like this, depending on the nature of the spell. (For example, the power of a Gorgon or Basilisk requires the victim to see the attacker, so blind people will be immune.)

    • Ghost Rider's Penance Stare ability requires the intended victim to look into his eyes. Due to the fact that he's got the power of a demon and most of his victims are mere mortals, avoiding it is easier said than done.
  • October 16, 2010
    carla
    i've added the bit about the blind.

    @arutema, aspie-- if you know any specific moments when people avoid these abilities (or at least attempt to), that would really bring these examples full circle.
  • October 16, 2010
    BlackWolfe
    Speaking about the blind being immune;

    • In Bleach, Kaname Tousen, being blind, is immune to Aizen's Perfect Hypnosis, and when this is brought up, reveals he's been working for Aizen the whole time.
  • October 16, 2010
    carla
    added the bleach example!
  • October 16, 2010
    TwinBird
    Would Mystery Men count?

    • Kel Mitchell's character in Mystery Men claims he can turn invisible, but only if no one can see him, a power most of the others think he's imagined until he uses it to get past a magical automated turret.
  • October 17, 2010
    carla
    ^ i think that would be an inversion, actually. funny, i didn't think we could get an inversion for this trope. xD i'll add it!
  • October 17, 2010
    Mozgwsloiku
    Note that Code Geass actually subverts this trope as the eye contact doesn't need to be direct - At one point Lelouch uses dozens of small mirrors to catch a glimpse of his target's eyes.
  • October 17, 2010
    carla
    ^ alright, i will make note of that. thanks for letting me know!

    okay, guys. i will be launching this on wednesday if nobody has anything else to add. do let me know which title you prefer, though! so far No Eye In Magic seems to be the front runner, but if another title gets more votes, that'll be the one.
  • October 17, 2010
    Generality
    • Inverted in Doctor Who with the Weeping Angels, which are only dangerous if you don't look at them. A later Ret Con plays it straight, though, and they can also kill you if you look them straight in the eye.
  • October 17, 2010
    carla
    added the Doctor Who example. (really, i should've remembered that one myself-- those weeping angels were freakin' scary!)
  • October 19, 2010
    carla
    hey guys, can anybody confirm if the shamer abilities in the Shamer Chronicles series still count as an example after the definition changed? anyone? starry-eyed? also, i think there's such a thing as avoiding eye-contact spells in D&D, but i can't be sure, so some confirmation for that as well would help a lot.

    and also, please please please do comment on which title you think is better. i would rather this not end up in TRS one day after it's launched.
  • October 19, 2010
    RedWren
    I've already voted (for No Eye In Magic), so can't help you there. However, by Three Rules Of Three, you have enough, so in theory this should work. I would suggest leaving No Eye Contact No Magic as a redirect, simply because it's more searchable.
  • October 19, 2010
    carla
    i was thinking of just leaving the other alternate titles as redirects, since Redirects Are Free and such. hoping to get a few more votes, though...
  • October 21, 2010
    carla
    okay, you guys, i didn't get time to launch this last night, so i'll do it friday night-- which means, you have two more days to speak up! anything you want to add, which title you prefer, just let me know!
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=lr97q0wwo5syxcnc7u2bgdeq