Created By: Grandy on February 27, 2012 Last Edited By: Grandy on March 4, 2016

Accessory Wearing Actual Animal

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Trope
(so I started a trope that was way to specific... am now expanding it to something that is less so)

This trope is for animals wearing accessories and pieces of clothing. Only, they are not cartoonish animals; they still walk on four legs, most don't talk, eat from the floor and their lack of opposing thumbs prevent them from holding things.

The reasons to give animals such accessories in media is to make them more unique; people would likely remember a puppy with a tophat instead of a simple puppy. Can also be used to mask the fact more than one dog is used for the same role: the audience would remember the accessory and overlook the fact this dog is slightly smaller or bigger depending on the scene.

Given the lack of propper clothing that animals can wear without feeling unconfortable, this usually materialises in a scarf.

Truth in Television: some owners do give dogs clothes for them to wear, mostly for small dogs in winter, and policedogs are known to wear bulletproof jackets.

Examples

  • Sissel's true form, a black cat wearing a red scarf from Ghost Trick
  • Sakamoto-san from Nichijou wears a red scarf, which allows him to speak.
  • Mephisto's dog form from Ao no Exorcist wears a pink dotted scarf.
  • The unnamed fox from Persona 4 wears a red scarf.
  • All the 8 canine warriors from Ōkami have scarves.
  • Wishbone would dress differently for each episode.
  • Peanuts: In Snoopy's first appearance he's got a flower tucked into his dog collar, but is otherwise a normal dog.
  • In the later Earth's Children books, Ayla's horses Whinney & Racer are given special blankets to wear tied around their necks in order to alert people that "these horses are special. Don't hunt them for food." It doesn't always work.
    • Also, when Ayla takes them over a glacier during her Journey she ties leather bags over their feet in order to protect them from the cold. Also the feet of Wolf, her pet wolf.
  • In the Classic Disney Short, "Pluto's Sweater," Minnie Mouse forces Pluto to wear a sweater. At the end of said cartoon, she forces Figaro to wear it.
Community Feedback Replies: 54
  • February 27, 2012
    TrustBen
    Have my doubts about whether this is tropeable. Do the red kerchiefs signify anything?
  • February 27, 2012
    Elbruno
    Unless this has a meaning or simbolism in the narrative, it would fall under People Sit On Chairs.
  • February 27, 2012
    Stratadrake
    It doesn't have to be a real deep meaning -- some things are common enough that people deliberately do it out of imitation, without care for the reason why -- that's still a trope, but few things can get away with that.
  • February 27, 2012
    Grandy
    It's not People Sit On Chairs, because that'd imply it's something is so common, doing it is not a trope but just depicting reality. Now let me ask you this; when was the last time you ever saw a cat with any handkerchief around it's neck? These are three cats, with the exact same color, and with the exact same handkerchief color, in three different media, by three different authors. If it's a coincidence, it's one hell of a coincidence.
  • February 27, 2012
    Stratadrake
    Uh, that's not quite what PSOC means. PSOC is about something that is common because it was incidental or lacks meaning, not something that lacks meaning because it's common.
  • February 27, 2012
    animeg3282
    A trope would be that the main cat character wears a red hankie on its neck,right? Or that black cats tend to be the villian or something..
  • February 27, 2012
    Stratadrake
    If it's specifically to imply they're a villain, they're Red And Black And Evil All Over.
  • February 28, 2012
    peccantis
    Coicidences are not tropes. The combination of black cat + red scarf needs to mean something, otherwise it's just coincidence.
  • February 28, 2012
    Frank75
    Well, do these cats have something else in common? Maybe OP is on to something, though I can't tell what either.
  • February 28, 2012
    YouKeepUsingThatWord
    Maybe it just looks nice? Like a redhead dressed in green.
  • February 28, 2012
    TonyG
    There might be a broader trope here, about pets wearing handkerchiefs and similar accesories (as opposed to an Accessory Wearing Cartoon Animal, since this would be about normal animals). Otherwise, it seems to be Too Rare To Trope or People Sit On Chairs.
  • March 7, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Bump?
  • March 8, 2012
    HaggisMcCrablice
    I've seen quite a few dogs wear kerchiefs instead of collars, esp. in shows or films set in the South.
  • March 28, 2012
    Grandy
    Okay, so I followed suggestions and this is now about animals that are actual animals but wear accessories.
  • March 28, 2012
    WackyMeetsPractical
    Does this exclude collars?
  • March 28, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    If this trope is launched, can it be put under Appropriate Animal Attire.
  • March 28, 2012
    EdnaWalker
  • March 28, 2012
    Grandy
    @Wacky Yup. I mean if not we'd have to name every animal in media ever.

    @Edna I suppose not. That trope is about how animals don't feel ashamed about wearing no clothes or something. I'm not sure the focus would be the same.

    @I was going for a sister trope with Half Dressed Cartoon Animal :/ Then again since this is mostly acessories I think I'd better call it Accessory Wearing Actual Animal, to make a sister to Accessory Wearing Cartoon Animal.

  • March 28, 2012
    randomsurfer
    Peanuts: In Snoopy's first appearance he's got a flower tucked into his dog collar, but is otherwise a normal dog.
  • March 29, 2012
    Met
    In the kids' movie Napoleon, the title puppy is wearing a large bow. The other animals tease him for it. Eventually he gets it caught on something and it comes off.
  • March 30, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Can this be a subtrope to Appropriate Animal Attire and a sister trope to both Half Dressed Cartoon Animal and Accessory Wearing Cartoon Animal.
  • March 30, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Here are some examples that I pulled from Accessory Wearing Cartoon Animal.

    Anime and Manga
    • Kero from Card Captor Sakura frequently wears a ribbon or some sort of collar that matches Sakura's outfit during the card capture sequences.
    • Kamichama Karin - Karin's pet cat, Shii-chan, has a red ribbon around her neck at the start of the series. After she comes Back From The Dead as Karin's Mentor Mascot, she gets an olive with two leaves instead, to match Karin's hair decs.

    Animated Films
    • From Balto, Jenna wears a red bandana around her neck in place of a collar. This bandana actuality becomes a plot point in the first movie when she gives it to Balto to keep him warm in the frozen Alaskan wilderness. In the fight with Steel, Steel grabs the bandana and it falls with him off of the cliff. When Steel presents it to Jenna, she whiffs the scents on it, telling her that Steel's story is false.
    • Dumbo starts out naked, but about halfway through the film, he actually starts to wear a hat and a collar, both of which he has actually worn ever since.
    • Dinah from Alice In Wonderland wears a pink bow around her neck.
    • Djali the goat from The Hunchback Of Notre Dame wears only an earring.
    • Dodger from Oliver And Company wears only a red bandana (which mysteriously vanishes when he wraps the string of hot dogs around his neck) and, in one scene, sunglasses.
      • Also, Tito the Chihuahua is inexplicably drawn with an earring in the show House Of Mouse (in the movie, he never wore earrings).
        • The earring was (to this editor's memory) on the plush as well; maybe it was part of the original character design and was removed from the film due to fears that parents would complain?
    • The cows from Home On The Range all wear cowbells, while Mrs. Calloway wears a hat.

    Western Animation
    • In the Figaro cartoon Bath Day, Minnie ties a red bow around Figaro's neck. He thinks he looks like a sissy wearing a bow, so he tries (and fails) to take it off.

  • March 30, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Would Accessory Wearing Normal Animal be a better name?
  • March 30, 2012
    Grandy
    @Etna *shrug* sure why not?

    Also, for the examples you gave, I'm not sure Kero from CCS works. He's a pretty humanoid being in his chibi form. The others are fine. I'll edit them in tomorrow, (or rather later today, given it's past mid-night where I live). Too sleepy.
  • March 30, 2012
    randomsurfer
    • In the later Earths Children books, Ayla's horses Whinney & Racer are given special blankets to wear tied around their necks in order to alert people that "these horses are special. Don't hunt them for food." It doesn't always work.
      • Also, when Ayla takes them over a glacier during her Journey she ties leather bags over their feet in order to protect them from the cold. Also the feet of Wolf, her pet wolf.
  • April 5, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Can half-dressed normal animals count as part of this trope?
  • April 5, 2012
    sigh824
    Does a wolf carrying a pipe count?
  • April 6, 2012
    Grandy
    Sure why not and sure, why not?
  • April 6, 2012
    sigh824
    Ok. Then Repede counts.[1]
  • April 6, 2012
    IsaacSapphire
    How does this work in relation to RL animals? It would make sense to exclude regular items for the animal to wear, like a collar or a halter, but there are a lot of other, non-traditional items an animal might wear. Working animals almost always wear special packs or blankets marking them as such, police dogs have bullet-proof jackets, military dogs have gas masks and so on.
  • April 6, 2012
    randomsurfer
    Stereotypically (and incorrectly) rescue St. Bernards have a tiny barrel of whiskey attached to their collar so the rescued person can have a belt.
  • April 8, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Many small dogs wear shirts, jackets, or coats to keep warm. Also, a dog or cag might wear a bow or ribbon around his/her neck.

  • April 9, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    There is a similarly named YKTTW called Wearing Actual Animal Accessory but that is about a character wearing an actual animal as an accessory like a mink stole.
  • April 13, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Bump?
  • April 28, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Bump?
  • May 5, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Horses wear horseshoes to protect their hooves. There are also jackets made for horses to keep them warm or dry.
  • May 5, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    • In episodes of Go Diego Go that show Baby Jaguar and are set in an Arctic setting, Baby Jaguar wears a winter coat.
  • May 5, 2012
    cygnavamp
    • Becomes a serious plot point in Animal Farm. One of the commandments is "No animal shall wear clothes." This includes ribbons horses are sometimes dressed up with and Boxer even burns a straw hat he used to wear in summer. Then the pigs start showing up walking on two legs, fully attired....
  • May 5, 2012
    SharleeD
    Maybe what's needed to make this a trope is the use of clothing to designate an animal as an important character. If there are three identical dogs in the background, and one of them has a bandana on, guess which of the three will turn out to be important to the story?
  • May 6, 2012
    Stratadrake
    I am also worried about relatively little to distinguish this from the existing Accessory Wearing Cartoon Animal (which, if it is about anthropomorphized animals only, the title is slightly misleading).

    However, if it's about the use of worn accessories to distinguish one character over another -- "Accessorized Importance", if you will -- that is most certainly distinct, though it still needs a better name.
  • May 11, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Bump?
  • May 16, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Wild animals sometimes wear radio collars and birds sometimes wear tags on their feet.
  • May 16, 2012
    Stratadrake
    But those aren't done out of a personal choice to wear them.
  • May 17, 2012
    EdnaWalker
  • June 1, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Bump?
  • June 2, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Bump.
  • June 3, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Could this trope be called Accesorized Importance For Animals
  • June 3, 2012
    Stratadrake
    Not without doing the Super Trope first.
  • July 21, 2012
    EdnaWalker
    Would the Super Trope be called Accessorized Importance.
  • March 4, 2016
    Pichu-kun
    • It's the norm for dogs in Harvest Moon to wear a red bandanna around their neck. This is a leftover from the original protagonist, Pete, who wore a red bandanna.
  • September 23, 2014
    DAN004
    Air Bud movies always have their dog characters wearing their respective sports uniform.
  • September 24, 2014
    SharleeD
    Tertiary Sexual Characteristics is related when an animal is designated as female by giving them a bow, flower, or other feminizing accessory.

    If the animal is dressed up to pass it off as a different or fictional type of animal, that's a Slurpasaur.

    • In a Real Life example, an orphaned deer that was raised by a human couple and then set loose was dressed in a day-glow orange vest before release, so hunters who spotted him would either mistake him for a fellow-hunter from a distance, or else realize the animal was once someone's pet and leave him be.
    • Dog booties are commonly used by long-distance walkers to protect their canine companions' feet from rough terrain or ice. They're also standard wear for rescue dogs that venture into the rubble of collapsed buildings, where broken glass and sharp metal debris are common.
    • In an ugly example, the Ku Klux Klansmen in Birth Of A Nation dress up their horses as well as themselves in Klan costumes.
  • September 24, 2014
    Snicka
  • March 4, 2016
    Pichu-kun
    Film

    Anyone keeping up this trope? It needs cleaning up.
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