Created By: fulltimeD on March 13, 2011 Last Edited By: fulltimeD on April 24, 2013

Alien Trash Of The Galaxy

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Trope
In some settings, there is a species (usually without a home) that is very widespread and widely hated by other species. Usually the victims of Fantastic Racism.

  • Humans in Titan A.E.
  • A Starfleet admiral predicts that Klingons will become this if their society collapses in Star Trek VI
  • Sebaceans in Farscape are widespread and hated by just about everyone because of the actions of the Peacekeepers
  • Prawns in District 9
  • Tenctonese slaves in Alien Nation
Community Feedback Replies: 18
  • March 13, 2011
    SweetMadness
    So a species-wide Butt Monkey?

  • March 13, 2011
    fulltimeD
    Yeah, pretty much.
  • March 14, 2011
    randomsurfer
    In the Back Story to Star Trek Deep Space Nine (and the entire Star Trek Verse by extension) this is how all "solids" treated the Founders, a Shapeshifting species. So they founded the Dominion to take over the galaxy.
  • March 14, 2011
    MikeArrow
    Quarians in Mass Effect, being viewed as nomadic locusts.
  • March 14, 2011
    TonyG
    Tamaranians in the Teen Titans episode "Troq".
  • March 14, 2011
    Prfnoff
    Gully dwarves in Dragonlance.
  • December 29, 2012
    Tallens
    • In Babylon Five we have the Pak'Ma'Ra, a race of carrion eaters with squid looking faces. They don't seem to be outright hated, but most other races do go out of their way to ignore them, something that makes Delenn hit on the idea that they could be used as couriers for sensitive messages.
  • December 29, 2012
    Shippudentimes
    • Humans(again) to the Covenant in the first three Halo games, as well as Halo Wars, Halo4 Halo 3 ODST, Halo Reach, and the subsequent Halo Expanded Universe, though, here, it is a much more extreme case than in Titan Ae. In this universe, the Covenant view humanity as an affront to their religion and are not afraid to glass any planet containing any sort of human settlement on it.
    • Mutantkind in X Men.
  • December 29, 2012
    Tallens
    I think details should be added to the examples already present. Why, exactly, are they hated or looked down on?
  • December 29, 2012
    TehMastehSord
    Goombas.
  • December 29, 2012
    chicagomel
    Animorphs: The Yeerks, though it's justified since they're parasites that take over other beings' bodies. They hate Andalites, but that doesn't seem universal.
  • December 29, 2012
    dvorak
    • fantasy version with dwarves in The Hobbit An Unexpected Journey, although it's rather downplayed.
    • Vorcha from MassEffect2. They're violent, ugly,nomadic scavengers and have snarly voices with odd speech patterns. In-universe and out, they're reffered to (read "slurred") as "space Goblins".
  • December 29, 2012
    WeAreAllKosh
    Literature

    In the Dune universe, the Tleilaxu (or Bene Tleilax) were generally distrusted or hated (called "dirty Tleilaxu") by other orders or branches of humanity. Their general secrecy, manipulative ways, and penchant for extreme genetic experimentation and tampering seemed to have had a lot to do with that.

    The Bene Gesserit were also distrusted (if not feared) for their secrecy and advanced psychic powers, and often called "witches", but as they were pretty much insinuated into every seat of power among the Noble Houses (and revered as holy people in some civilizations through the missionaria protectiva), they probably don't fit the trope as looked-down-upon "trash".

    (Note also that the Dune 'verse is human-only as far as sentients (at least until those semi-sentient feline creatures show up with the Honored Matres), but I think "alien trash" might still fit the Tleilaxu, since humans have branched into very diverse physical as well as cultural groupings, separated by huge distances, that might be somewhat "alien" to each other to a degree beyond the diverse civs of Earth).
  • December 29, 2012
    WeAreAllKosh
    Oh, and how could I forget the most obvious from Dune:

    • The Fremen were also outcasts in the Dune universe. Their religious society had historically been persecuted, and was forced to migrate from world to world until they finally settled on Arrakis, where they were looked down upon and oppressed by the Harkonnens who came to rule the planet, and were generally considered primitive desert rabble. Under the leadership of Paul Muad'dib Atreides they gained ascendancy in the galaxy in a spectacular manner however.
  • December 30, 2012
    DRCEQ
    • An inversion happens Star Trek Voyager. Species 8472 treats the entire physical plane of space as this. Coming from Fluidic Space, they had never known of any other types of lifeforms before the Borg invaded and started attacking them. As such, they have a mistrust of all lifeforms from the normal plane of space because they think that if one species attacks them, then EVERY species would. Things are only exacerbated when Voyager helps fight them off, not knowing that the Borg were the ones who instigated the fights in the first place. Voyager later comes upon a created simulation of Starfleet Academy, learning that Species 8472 was training themselves to look and act like Humans so they could infiltrate them and be ready for "Starfleet's inevitable invasion".

    The inversion, in this case, comes from one species thinking themselves superior to everything else, instead of everything else looking down on the species.
  • December 30, 2012
    Tallens
    ^Inversion like that, I think, might warrant a separate trope of its own. Do we have that?
  • December 30, 2012
    Shippudentimes
    As for my Halo example from earlier, The Covenant's culture and religion are based solely on the worship and reverence of an ancient Precursor race called The Forerunners, and subsequently, view any sort of Forerunner tech as a holy relic, like the Shroud of Turin and the Ark of the Covenant for Christianity, and are willing to go to war to search and uncover such artifacts. Well, turns out that humanity was discovered by the Covenant to be directly related to the Forerunners, the one species that this religious-militant society sacrificed lives for. Naturally, this pissed the Covenant off, and they began a 28-year long genocidal campaign across dozens of human planet colonies, including Earth itself, glassing entire worlds to exterminate the human species, which they believed to be an affront to their religion.
  • April 24, 2013
    Tallens
    Bump
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