The Omnipresent
A creature with the ability to be in all places at all times.
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(permanent link) added: 2013-08-12 22:19:52 sponsor: Discar (last reply: 2013-10-27 16:49:37)

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Nita: You're here too?
Transcendent Pig: The problem with being transcendent is that people keep asking you that.

Under normal space-time rules, people exist in only one place at one time. They can cheat with remote bodies, clone bodies, mind copies, and so on, but physically one body can only occupy one place.

Some people don't follow that rule.

For whatever reason—inherent trait, aborted ascension, whatever, these people can exist wherever and whenever they please. Often results in many, many instances of Offscreen Teleportation, except they didn't teleport; you just noticed that they were somewhere else.

See also The Omnipotent and The Omniscient. Has no relation to Omnipresent Tropes.

Examples

    open/close all folders 

    Anime and Manga 

  • Schrodinger of Hellsing is a sort of self-observation with will. Self-described as "everywhere and nowhere," if he wills himself as being in any place at any time, he appears there, including in people's thoughts (as was seen in Zorin Blitz's last moments). This became Alucard's downfall, as his very existence relies on being aware of himself, and once that self was absorbed into Alucard, who exists beside millions of consciousnesses in a single being, he was no longer able to recognize himself as alive or dead (and neither could Alucard by extension). This erased a once-thought immortal, unstoppable vampire from the series, all the way until the epilogue.

    Comic Books 

  • Superman Prime, the Future Badass version of Superman, is explicitly stated to be the perfection trifecta: Omnipotent, Omniscient and Omnipresent. He's supposed to be only one step below The Presence.
  • Watchmen gives us Dr. Manhattan. Due to his powers, he can create as many copies of himself as he wants, and maintaining perfect control over them since they're all technically him (he also exists outside of time, so he also knows what people were/are/will be doing). It seriously creeps out (and annoys) his girlfriend that he's simultaneously having sex with her and working on his project.

    Film 

  • In Jumper, the Paladins reference this, claiming that the reason they hunt the jumpers is because "Only God should have this power—to be in all places, at all times." Note that the jumpers aren't actually an example (being pretty standard teleporters), the Paladins are just over-reacting fanatics.

    Literature 

  • The Transcendent Pig from Diane Duane's Young Wizards series. Yes, it really is an Earth pig, strutting about on its hind legs and chatting with random people. It's also technically not a creature, since none of the gods can remember creating it. Due to the implication that it is also The Omniscient, all wizards are under strict orders to greet it with "What is the meaning of life?" in the hope that one day it will slip up and answer.
  • On the Discworld, Death is everywhere at once, though we only see him when narrative causality requires it. The best example would be Wyrd Sisters, where he is simultaneously looking at where King Felmet jumped off and waiting for him at the boase of the cliff.
  • In the original Cthulhu Mythos stories, Yog-Sothoth was locked out of our universe and had its freedom of movement and appearance severely limited, so it wasn't an example of this trope (but could have been if the Old Ones had ever gotten loose).

    Religion and Mythology 

    Tabletop Games 

  • Dungeons & Dragons. Dragon magazine #12, "The Lovecraftian Mythos in Dungeons And Dragons''. The Cthulhu Mythos deity Yog-Sothoth is not subject to the laws of space and time and can appear at various parts of the universe simultaneously.

    Video Games 

  • Bioshock Infinite
    • The Lutece twins, due to a Freak Lab Accident (that wasn't really an accident) were scattered across all universes simultaneously. While within the game, they only use this for Offscreen Teleportation and "dodging" bullets at point-blank range ("You missed!"), you eventually discover that they used their powers to bring Booker to Columbia in the first place, and the events of the game represent their one-hundred and eleventh try (if not more).
    • In the final act of the game, Elizabeth becomes this when her Power Limiter is destroyed.

    Webcomics 

  • Unwinders Tall Comics has the in-universe short story "The Gimel" (an Affectionate Parody of Jorge Luis Borges' "The Aleph"), which appears on pages 83 and 84. The Gimel is an object which causes anyone who touches it to become omnipresent—and the incompetent author Soncho Michez accidentally finds one at the bottom of a barrel. "It's sort of like if there were hundreds and hundreds of Sonchos out there all over the whole entire world, and there is nowhere you can go without me being in your way."
  • Casey and Andy: Bob, who has the ability to "be there, too". Meaning that any sentence can be affixed with "Bob was there, too." In essence Bob is (or at least, can be) everywhere.

    Web Original 
  • Anonymous claims to be this, at least in the Internet.
    "We are Anonymous. We are Legion. We do not forgive. We do not forget. Expect us."

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