Created By: ShiningwingX on January 28, 2014 Last Edited By: ShiningwingX on February 9, 2014
Troped

Everyone Calls Him Elf

When a character is referred to by the name of their race, rather than their actual name.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Some characters know each other enough to speak on a First-Name Basis. Other times the setting calls for a more formal Last Name Basis.

Then we have this. A character either doesn't know or doesn't care to use the subject's proper name and instead calls them by their race.

This trope refers mostly to those settings where each race is fundamentally different to one another. Because of this, it is most common in fantasy or science fiction works. Stories featuring the Five Races are almost certain to possess some measure of this, though certain other settings, such as a World of Funny Animals also apply. However, it does not refer to Present Day settings, such as use of the N-Word as these are almost certain to be derogatory unless shown otherwise. While Fantastic Racism often does tie into this it is not the only reason for it.

The reasons for referring to one by their race tend to be more varied in fantastical settings than they are in reality. It could be a sign of respect, or lack of it. Maybe they haven't yet been properly introduced. Maybe the other character's name is simply too strange to pronounce. This is particularly common among Token Nonhuman characters. Legolas and Gimli are, for example, the token elf and dwarf in the The Lord of the Rings.

In such situations don't expect any confusion to come of this, even if more than one of said race is present. Somehow, even with all the use of racial designation, the characters always seem to know which individual is being called upon any time the name of their race is uttered by another. In extreme cases, characters will do this even when speaking to others of their own race.

Naturally, there is a bit of Truth in Television to this. However, due to the fact that most of these tend to be derogatory and offensive, No Real Life Examples, Please!.

Note that the title is a play on Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep", but it is more closely related to name basis tropes and doesn't necessarily refer to a character who lacks a proper name.

See also First-Name Basis, and Last Name Basis. Related to Hey, You!. Compare Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep" when this is done with professions rather than race, and N-Word Privileges where a certain term (normally those found in Real Life) is "derogatory without permission". If doing this doubles as First-Name Basis then you're probably on a Planet of Steves.

Examples:

Anime and Manga

  • In Bleach, many of the characters refer to other races by the names of the races, subraces, or epithets such as "Shinigami", "Arrancar", "Quincy", etc. In particular, the Hot-Blooded Grimmjow alternates between this trope and Last Name Basis for the protagonist.
  • In Dragon Ball Vegeta routinely called Piccolo 'Namek' in the English dub, interchangeable with Namekian as even Piccolo describes himself as 'a Namek' to others.

Film

  • Downplayed in Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, where Azeem calls Robin "Christian" (initially because he was a complete stranger who happened to be Christian, and later as a term of endearment). He addresses the rest of the (presumably Christian) cast normally.
  • In Dragonheart, Bowen calls the dragon "Dragon" mainly for lack of anything else to call him. Eventually, he gets tired of it, and declares he has a name, but admits that Bowen would never be able to pronounce it. Later, Bowen decides to call him Draco instead, basically calling him Dragon in another language. Draco points out the irony, but decides to go along with it.
  • Discussed in detail in Monty Python and the Holy Grail, where King Arthur calls a peasant "Old Man," and then "Man" when he points out that he isn't old, before the peasant says Arthur should call him Dennis.
    ARTHUR: Old woman!
    DENNIS: Man!
    ARTHUR: Old Man, sorry. What knight lives in that castle over there?
    DENNIS: I'm thirty seven.
    ARTHUR: What?
    DENNIS: I'm thirty seven — I'm not old!
    ARTHUR: Well, I can't just call you 'Man.'
    DENNIS: Well, you could say 'Dennis.'
    ARTHUR: Well, I didn't know you were called 'Dennis.'
    DENNIS: Well, you didn't bother to find out, did you?
  • The villainous Steel often calls the titular Balto "wolf-dog" to his face, to disparage Balto's mixed parentage.
  • The arrogant and pretentious Cat R Waul knows Fievel Mousekewicz's name in Fievel Goes West, but calls him "mouse" to emphasize his Fantastic Racism that mice are hopelessly inferior to cats.
    Listen, mouse: I am the law here, and you are a mere hors d'oeuvre.
  • In Babe the farmer never calls Babe anything other than "pig." Since the animals are only intelligible to each other, the farmer doesn't know his 'real' name.

Live-Action Television

  • In an early episode of Star Trek: Voyager Chakotay is captured by a group of Kazon, one of whom has to kill someone to become a man. The youngster refers to Chakotay as "Starfleet" to dehumanize (or rather, de-sentient-being-ize) him in his own mind, and/or to show Chakotay and by extension the Starfleet crew contempt. Chakotay threw it back in his face, calling him "Kazon" to show he's not being intimidated.
    • In Star Trek: Voyager Neelix calls everyone by their rank & last name except Tuvok, whom he calls "Mr. Vulcan" after a conversation following their meeting. Being unfamiliar with the customs, it is reasonable to assume that Neelix took "I am Vulcan" to mean "my name is Vulcan." He continued to call him "Mr. Vulcan" even afte he would have been corrected, likely as a private joke between the two of them that only he finds funny.
    NEELIX: Astonishing! You Federations are obviously an advanced culture.
    TUVOK: The Federation is made up of many cultures. I am Vulcan.
  • Babylon 5: In the episode "Soul Hunter", the Soul Hunter is in Medlab when the Minbari Ambassador comes to see him, "What do you want, Minbari?" Shortly after he recognizes her as Delenn of the Grey Council, after which he refers to her as such.
  • StargateSG1: In a running gag, Master Bra'tac refuses to call Jack O'Neill by his name, preferring to call him "Human." It's implied to be an in-joke between them.
  • Star Trek: The Original Series episode "Friday's Child" has a Klingon character named Kras. Kirk calls him "Klingon" twice, Maab calls him "Klingon" six separate times and Eleen calls him "Klingon" once. This is because his real name is never spoken during the episode. The only way the viewer learns it is by reading the end credits.
  • Occurs in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Tapestries," when an arrogant Nausicaan challenges a known and skilled Starfleet cadet to "Play dom-jot, hu-man."

Literature

  • The Lord of the Rings: Legolas and Gimli regularly refer to one another as "Elf" and "Dwarf" respectively. As the story goes on, the use of these evolves from derisive, to respectful, to terms of endearment.
  • The Witcher: Elves, and to a lesser extent other races, refer to humans as "dh'oine", which is simply "Human" in the Elder Language. The Scoia'tael in particular use it as a border-line insult.
  • ArtemisFowl: There is actually fairy etiquette about this, a bit like N-Word Privileges. Calling someone by their species name is only acceptable if you're good friends, else it's insulting. Most fairies do call all humans 'human' though, when they don't call them Mudmen, that is.
  • In Artemis Fowl Ark Sool refers to Foaly as "centaur" which Foaly notes is insulting to do unless between friends.

Video Games

  • Common in World of Warcraft; NPC's will usually address the player as their race (tauren, orc, night elf, etc) or character class (warrior, mage, hunter, etc), unless there's an in-story reason for the NPC to know the player's name. unlike most examples of this trope, it's not generally meant to be derogatory.
  • In ''The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim", the executioner at the beginning of the game calls the player character by their race name (or equivalent Fantastic Slur) when calling them to the chopping block. When playing as a custom race, though, she remains silent.
  • Neverwinter Nights 2 has a few instances of this, although they aren't always voiced (especially with races added in the expansions). For example, the encounter where you acquire Khelgar Ironfist as a party member has a couple of thugs derisively tell you (for instance) "This doesn't concern you, half-elf."
  • God of War: When not using Kratos's actual name, everyone, including gods, call him simply "Spartan" (well, except his soldiers, who are Spartan as well). The series wiki even lists Spartan as one of his aliases. The gods also sometimes call Kratos "mortal", even after he's technically become a god, and this one is used more as an insult.

Web Comic

  • In The Order of the Stick, Vaarsuvius refers to Belkar as "the halfling". This is less because of any general contempt for other races and mostly because it's Belkar; Roy, Haley, and Durkon are "Sir Greenhilt", "Miss Starshine" and "Master Thundershield" respectively (Elan has Only One Name, but sometimes just gets called "the bard"). Belkar has also been known to refer to Vaarsuvius as "elf".
  • Looking for Group: Characters have taken to calling Cale "Elf", and Krunch "Bloodrage". For Cale this is generally used by the main characters so that they speak with extra authority when they're about to lecture him for being naive. For Krunch's case it's mostly used by strangers and acquaintances, and is probably meant to be overtly racist.

Web Video
  • Discussed in Counter Monkey, "Dungeon Mastering a Great Game". Spoony is a big fan of roleplaying and doesn't like when players address each other by race or profession, "Elf, go identify that magic item" and "Thief, go pick that lock". He discusses causes for it and how you can avoid it in your Tabletop RPG session.

Western Animation

  • In Kung Fu Panda, Master Shifu usually refers to Po as "Panda". Fridge Brilliance implies that his other students, who seem to be examples of A Dog Named "Dog", might originally have had other names, but since Shifu always referred to them by their species, they started using those as their names.
  • In The Land Before Time, the dinosaurs have proper names as shown by the main characters, yet the adults never seem to have their names revealed. That doesn't stop Little Foot's Grandfather and Cera's dad from referring to each other as Three-Horn and Long-Neck respectively whenever they talk to each other though.
  • Star Trek: The Animated Series episode "The Jihad".
    • First Lara does it to Spock:
    EM3GREEN: We'll all die here.
    Spock: A statistical probability.
    Lara: You ever quote anything besides statistics, Vulcan?
    Spock: Yes. But philosophy and poetry are not appropriate here.
    • And then Sord does it as well.
    Spock: Sord, what did you think you saw back there?
    Sord: Don't know, Vulcan. A shape, couldn't really make it out. Probably seeing things, like Kirk figures.
Community Feedback Replies: 67
  • January 28, 2014
    Snicka
    Could this be applied to World Of Funny Animals settings where animals (that aren't examples of Species Surname or A Dog Named Dog otherwise) call each other by the name of their species?

    • In Kung Fu Panda, Master Shifu usually refers to Po as "Panda". Fridge Brilliance implies that his other students, who seem to be examples of A Dog Named Dog, might originally have had other names, but since Shifu always referred to them by their species, they started using those as their names.
  • January 28, 2014
    zarpaulus
    Web Original

    • Chakona Space: Chakats formally use their species name as a prefix, Chakat Goldfur for instance.
  • January 28, 2014
    Snicka
    Also compare Everyone Calls Him Barkeep, which is this applied to professions rather than races.
  • January 28, 2014
    Bisected8
    • Downplayed in Robin Hood Prince Of Thieves, where Azeem calls Robin "Christian" (initially because he was a complete stranger who happened to be Christian, and later as a term of endearment). He addresses the rest of the (presumably Christian) cast normally.
  • January 28, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    "first race"... as opposed to second race? that makes no sense. just drop the "first" and call it Race Name Basis.
  • January 28, 2014
    DAN004
    Suggesting Race Name Basis too.

    Compare Fantastic Slur
  • January 28, 2014
    MorganWick
    In The Order Of The Stick, Vaarsuvius refers to Belkar as "the halfling". This is less because of any general contempt for other races and mostly because it's Belkar; Roy, Haley, and Durkon are "Sir Greenhilt", "Miss Starshine" and "Master Thundershield" respectively (Elan has Only One Name, but sometimes just gets called "the bard"). Belkar has also been known to refer to Vaarsuvius as "elf".
  • January 28, 2014
    randomsurfer
    In an early episode of Star Trek Voyager Chakotay is captured by a group of Kazon, one of whom has to kill someone to become a man. The youngster refers to Chakotay as "Starfleet" and Chakotay likewise refers to him as "Kazon."
  • January 28, 2014
    somerandomdude
    Common in World Of Warcraft; NPC's will usually address the player as their race (tauren, orc, night elf, etc) or character class (warrior, mage, hunter, etc), unless there's an in-story reason for the NPC to know the player's name.
  • January 29, 2014
    Snicka
    Thirding Race Name Basis. (Or, alternatively, Everyone Calls Him Elf.)
  • January 29, 2014
    DAN004
    Sorry, disregard
  • January 29, 2014
    ShiningwingX
    First Race Basis was meant to be a play on First Name Basis but you're right. Race Name Basis sounds much better. I'll change that.

    Snicka: Yes. Providing they have proper names, it counts. Animals included.
  • January 29, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    You know, I think Everyone Calls Him Elf is clearer for some reason, can't really say why. crowner?
  • January 29, 2014
    ShiningwingX
    It sounds catchier, but I feel it might be misleading. Everyone Calls Him Barkeep refers to a character whose name is never specified so everyone simply calls them their profession. I'm worried that people might compare the two and think this only relates to a character who is called by their race due to lack of a proper name. Everyone Calls Him Elf might be a Logical Extreme but this is much broader.
  • January 29, 2014
    Rotpar
    I like Everyone Calls Him Elf, but it probably won't be allowed as it's a Snowclone.

    Web Video
    • Discussed in Counter Monkey, "Dungeon Mastering a Great Game". Spoony is a big fan of roleplaying and doesn't like when players address each other with Everyone Calls Him Elf and Everyone Calls Him Barkeep, "Elf, go identify that magic item" and "Thief, go pick that lock". He discusses causes for it and how you can avoid it in your Tabletop RPG session.
      • Some players have difficulty getting into character, or they find roleplaying uncomfortable, or they haven't loosened up around a group of strangers yet.
      • Players not taking an interest in other player's characters or, conversely, a player making a Flat Character not worth being interested in.
      • He recommends giving your character a memorable name, while warning against using an overly-long and hard to remember name. Why remember a name loaded with syllables that takes eight seconds to say when you can point and say "Hey, Elf"? He notes that elves are a frequent offender here.
      • He recommends giving your character an In-Game Nickname. It builds opportunities to build character and roleplay.
  • January 29, 2014
    Rotpar
    Too much info, eh? If anything, do you think the third bullet would be worth adding? "Why does everyone call me 'Elf'?" "Because we're not calling you Lafinalfandelfinal."

    If we can go with Everyone Calls Him Elf, should it be custom titled to Everyone Calls Him "Elf"? Everyone Calls Him Barkeep doesn't have a custom title, I'm trying to see if there was any official reason why it's not "Barkeep" and, otherwise, submit that for the custom title.
  • January 29, 2014
    crazysamaritan
  • January 29, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    Shiningwing X

    That's a good reason not to use it, unless this one is expanded to include the "lack of proper name" part.

    Rotpar

    none of those indented info are relevant to the trope.
  • January 29, 2014
    ShiningwingX
    Shanghai Slave : Well it does include it... but it includes more than JUST that. I'm just worried that people will see that title and immediately make the comparison to Everyone Calls Him Barkeep, only adding examples that relate to characters without proper names because of it. Maybe it would be better to think of something different entirely.

    Crazysamaritan: I'm sure it would be an easy find if searched for, that isn't the issue here. It's the connotations involved with the title.

    Rotpar: Yeah I had to edit out the secondary bullets since they basically just described his suggestions which aren't relevant to this.
  • January 30, 2014
    HumanTorch2
    StargateSG1: In a running gag, Master Bra'tac refuses to call Jack O'Neill by his name, preferring to call him "Human." It's implied to be an in-joke between them.
  • January 30, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    Shiningwing X: ah, I see.
  • January 30, 2014
    DAN004
    I'm rather tempted to use... the N word. :P

    So would we have real life examples or not?
  • January 30, 2014
    ShiningwingX
    DAN 004: You sir, just voiced something that I've thought about regarding this. Maybe I should append a Truth In Television statement but yeah... I think it would be better to have no real life examples because, well...
  • January 30, 2014
    KingZeal
    • In Bleach, many of the characters refer to other races by the names of the races, subraces, or epithets such as "Shinigami", "Arrancar", "Quincy", etc. In particular, the Hot Bloodded Grimmjow alternates between this trope and Last Name Basis for the protagonist.
  • January 30, 2014
    randomsurfer
    In Star Trek Voyager Neelix calls everyone by their rank & last name except Tuvok, whom he calls "Mr. Vulcan."
  • January 30, 2014
    Antigone3
    ^ I remember Spock being called "Vulcan" during the Original Series, but don't have an exact cite for you. I'm pretty sure it was one of the Mudd episodes.
  • January 30, 2014
    BaffleBlend
    • In ''The Elder Scrolls V Skyrim", the executioner at the beginning of the game calls the player character by their race name (or equivalent Fantastic Slur) when calling them to the chopping block. When playing as a custom race, though, she remains silent.
  • January 30, 2014
    ShiningwingX
    I decided I will change it to Everyone Calls Him Elf. I've noticed similar things on other pages around the site and there don't seem to have been any issues with those. I just appended a statement to further clarify things so that should eliminate any confusion.
  • January 30, 2014
    justanotherrandomlurker
    I think this is actually covered by A Dog Named Dog.
  • January 30, 2014
    Bisected8
    A Dog Named Dog is about a given name matching a species. This is more about calling someone by their species (and the generally implied lack of respect or indication that they don't meet their species that often).
  • January 30, 2014
    StarSword
    Video Games:
    • Neverwinter Nights 2 has a few instances of this, although they aren't always voiced (especially with races added in the expansions). For example, the encounter where you acquire Khelgar Ironfist as a party member has a couple of thugs derisively tell you (for instance) "This doesn't concern you, half-elf."
  • January 30, 2014
    DAN004
    At least Race Name Basis can be a redirect in that case.
  • January 30, 2014
    eowynjedi
    Not sure where The Muppets fall, but Kermit is frequently just called "frog" by anyone talking to him (or "the frog" if they're talking about him). Doesn't matter if it's one of his friends or enemies, or if he's starring as a literary character like Captain Smollett.
  • January 31, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    I'm sure i watched an anime where some Cute Monster Girl (or guy) calls a human human.

    but damn me i can't remember at all!

    DAN 004: "I'm rather tempted to use... the N word. :P "

    That would be N Word Privileges. you wouldn't see a white guy saying it, but those with privileges would gladly call them as such.
  • January 31, 2014
    crazysamaritan
    ^^ Kermit's full name is "Kermit the Frog". He is an example of A Dog Named Dog, as opposed to his "race" being a nickname. However, when he's supposed to be another character, if that person explicitly has a full name lacking "frog", that would count.
  • January 31, 2014
    Arivne
    Live Action TV
    • Star Trek The Original Series episode "Friday's Child" has a Klingon character named Kras. Kirk calls him "Klingon" twice, Maab calls him "Klingon" six separate times and Eleen calls him "Klingon" once. This is because his real name is never spoken during the episode. The only way the viewer learns it is by reading the end credits.

    Western Animation
    • Star Trek The Animated Series episode "The Jihad".
      • First Lara does it to Spock:
      EM3GREEN: We'll all die here.
      Spock: A statistical probability.
      Lara: You ever quote anything besides statistics, Vulcan?
      Spock: Yes. But philosophy and poetry are not appropriate here.
      • And then Sord does it as well.
      Spock: Sord, what did you think you saw back there?
      Sord: Don't know, Vulcan. A shape, couldn't really make it out. Probably seeing things, like Kirk figures.
  • January 31, 2014
    Green5
    Video Games

    Everyone of the Mercs in Team Fortress 2 address each other by their class names rather than their real names. For instance, if someone thinks that Tavish Degroot, the Demoman, is a Spy, they say "That Demo's a Spy!".
  • January 31, 2014
    Larkmarn
    ^ That's Everyone Calls Him Barkeep since the classes are their jobs.

    Anyway, I like this name.
  • January 31, 2014
    DAN004
    @ Shanghai Slave: Then that trope is related. :P
  • January 31, 2014
    somerandomdude
    An addendum I meant to add to the World Of Warcraft example: unlike most examples of this trope, it's not generally meant to be derogatory.
  • January 31, 2014
    UltramarineAlizarin
    To expand on the Order of the Stick example: there's some hypocrisy afoot, as in one case Miko refers to V as "Elf" (and Durkon by given name), and V protests.
  • February 1, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    there are some questionable examples in the OP.

    Examples that amount to "Trope happens" or "Trope gets used N times by Character X" is People Sit On Chairs, or rather, Zero Context Example.

    Instances of people calling others by their race must have meaning.

    Why are they calling him that way? Why does the character switch how he calls the other every now and then? What does it imply about the character? How does the character called by his race react to this?
  • February 1, 2014
    acrobox
    Anime And Manga

    • Vegeta routinely called Piccolo 'Namek' in the English dub which appears to be interchangeable with Namekian, as even Piccolo describes himself as 'a Namek' to others. Otherwise this would be more akin to calling for example the one American on the team 'America'
  • February 1, 2014
    xanderiskander
    Webcomic
    • Looking For Group: Characters have taken to calling Cale "Elf", and Krunch "Bloodrage". For Cale this is generally used by the main characters so that they speak with extra authority when they're about to lecture him for being naive. For Krunch's case it's mostly used by strangers and acquaintances, and is probably meant to be overtly racist.
  • February 1, 2014
    ShiningwingX
    Thanks Shanghai Slave. I expanded on the Lord Of The Rings example to add a bit more context to it. Unfortunately I don't have enough knowledge of the others to make the proper changes though. If the ones who posted those examples (or someone else who knows the works) could expand on them a little more, I'd appreciate it.
  • February 1, 2014
    Snicka
    A Token Nonhuman character is often the victim of this. Legolas and Gimli are, for example, the token elf and dwarf in the Fellowship of the Ring.
  • February 2, 2014
    Paradisesnake
    Video Games
    • God Of War: When not using Kratos's actual name, everyone, including gods, call him simply "Spartan" (well, except his soldiers, who are Spartan as well). The series wiki even lists Spartan as one of his aliases. The gods also sometimes call Kratos "mortal", even after he's technically become a god, and this one is used more as an insult.
  • February 2, 2014
    Mamona
    Literature
    • ArtemisFowl: There is actually fairy etiquette about this, a bit like N Word Privileges. Calling someone by their species name is only acceptable if you're good friends, else it's insulting. Most fairies do call all humans 'human' though, when they don't call them Mudmen, that is.
  • February 2, 2014
    randomsurfer
    I'll have to look up the Voyager examples in more detail (unless someone else chimes in) but as I recall, the Kazon youth called Chakotay "Starfleet" to dehumanize (or rather, de-sentient-being-ize) him in his own mind, and/or to show Chakotay and by extension the Starfleet crew conempt. Chakotay threw it back in his face to show he's not being intimidated. When Neelix first met Tuvok he asked him something like "and what are you?" Tuvok answered "I am a Vulcan," and so Neelix called him Mr. Vulcan.

    EDIT: This exchange occurs shortly after Neelix meets the Starfleet/Federation crew. He is energized and is astonished to discover that he is still in one piece.
    NEELIX: Astonishing! You Federations are obviously an advanced culture.
    TUVOK: The Federation is made up of many cultures. I am Vulcan.
    Captain Janeway had introduced herself by name, so it is reasonable to assume that Neelix took "I am Vulcan" to mean "my name is Vulcan." Even after he would have been corrected he still called Tuvok "Mr. Vulcan" as - I suppose - a private joke between the two of them that only he finds funny.
  • February 3, 2014
    Tallens
    • In Dragonheart, Bowen calls the dragon "Dragon" mainly for lack of anything else to call him. Eventually, he gets tired of it, and declares he has a name, but admits that Bowen would never be able to pronounce it. Later, Bowen decides to call him Draco instead, basically calling him Dragon in another language. Draco points out the irony, but decides to go along with it.
  • February 4, 2014
    randomsurfer
    • Discussed in detail in Monty Python And The Holy Grail, where King Arthur calls a peasant "Old Man," and then "Man" when he points out that he isn't old, before the peasant says Arthur should call him Dennis.
      ARTHUR: Old woman!
      DENNIS: Man!
      ARTHUR: Old Man, sorry. What knight lives in that castle over there?
      DENNIS: I'm thirty seven.
      ARTHUR: What?
      DENNIS: I'm thirty seven — I'm not old!
      ARTHUR: Well, I can't just call you 'Man.'
      DENNIS: Well, you could say 'Dennis.'
      ARTHUR: Well, I didn't know you were called 'Dennis.'
      DENNIS: Well, you didn't bother to find out, did you?

  • February 4, 2014
    Tallens
    • Babylon Five: In the episode "Soul Hunter", the Soul Hunter is in Medlab when the Minbari Ambassador comes to see him, "What do you want, Minbari?" Shortly after he recognizes her as Delenn of the Grey Council, after which he refers to her as such.
  • February 7, 2014
    ShiningwingX
    Okay that's five, but I feel like I should give it another day or so and see if anyone has anything else to add before launching. Thanks for all the help everyone!
  • February 7, 2014
    Larkmarn
    Question: Would a non-species version of this count?

    Like if someone referred to a guy as "Chinaman" and never by his real name.
  • February 7, 2014
    DAN004
  • February 7, 2014
    ShiningwingX
    As DAN 004 said, it's there in the description.
  • February 7, 2014
    Larkmarn
    No Real Life Examples Please is, but that doesn't cover a fictional character to whom this applies.
  • February 7, 2014
    oneuglybunny
    Live Action TV
    • Occurs in the Star Trek The Next Generation episode "Tapestries," when an arrogant Nausicaan challenges a known and skilled Starfleet cadet to "Play dom-jot, hu-man."

    Film
    • The villainous Steel often calls the titular Balto "wolf-dog" to his face, to disparage Balto's mixed parentage.
    • The arrogant and pretentious Cat R Waul knows Fievel Mousekewicz's name in Fievel Goes West, but calls him "mouse" to emphasize his Fantastic Racism that mice are hopelessly inferior to cats.
      Listen, mouse: I am the law here, and you are a mere hors d'oeuvre.
  • February 7, 2014
    Larkmarn
    EDIT: oneuglybunny's diligence made this post comically unnecessary. Pretend I never made it.
  • February 7, 2014
    Tallens
    ^It's from the sequel.
  • February 7, 2014
    oneuglybunny
    Okay, fixed. The quote occurs in the sequel. Plus, changed the category to "Film," since there are too few entries at this point to justify segregating by Live Action / Animated.
  • February 7, 2014
    ShiningwingX
    Larkmarn: I want to say no... This is more for those settings where 'races' are distinctly different from one another rather than just skin color and nationality. I feel those are more along the lines of N Word Privileges.
  • February 7, 2014
    Larkmarn
    In that case, that should be explicitly stated in the description. I don't care either way whether they get included, I just want to make sure people don't start adding them if it's Trope Decay.
  • February 7, 2014
    ShiningwingX
    I would agree with you. That's why I waited rather than launching prematurely. I'll add that.
  • February 8, 2014
    DAN004
    When I said No Real World Examples Plz I meant that examples shouldn't talking about races in Real Life. Keep it to just fictional races. (Calling a mutant as such in X Men shpuld count.)
  • February 8, 2014
    randomsurfer
    In Babe the farmer never calls Babe anything other than "pig."
  • February 8, 2014
    randomtroper89
    Literature
    • In Artemis Fowl Ark Sool refers to Foaly as "centaur" which Foaly notes is insulting to do unless between friends.
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