Created By: HellKillUsAll on February 10, 2014 Last Edited By: gallium on September 17, 2015
Troped

Suicide By Sea

Killing yourself by walking into the ocean.

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"The tides shall drift my sins away,
as the sea embraces my cold body"

This is an example of being Driven to Suicide in which you walk or swim into a body of water, such as an ocean, lake or river, and drown in it. This usually happens at nighttime for a calm, painless death. The scene itself will most likely use dialog of Rule of Symbolism using "drifting away" metaphors.

This is a Death Trope, so expect spoilers, marked and unmarked.
For any tropers who feel this way... You Are Not Alone. There are numbers you can call. Please, talk to someone.

Examples:

Anime

Literature
  • In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, protagonist Edna swims far into the sea and lets herself be drowned. It's quite symbolic as learning to swim and bathing in the sea meant a lot for her and unleashed her desires and creativity.
  • In Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar, Esther has been trying to commit suicide. After failing to hang/strangle herself because of her body's natural preservation instincts, she decides to swim so far out into the ocean that she won't be able to swim back. She chooses a large rock as a marker to swim to only to realize that if she reaches it, she'll simply climb on the rock. She tries to drown herself where she is but is unsuccessful.
  • In the bleak ending of Far Rainbow, the Tester Group swims to their deaths into the approaching Wave (a colossal wall of negative energy spawned by a scientific experiment Gone Horribly Wrong) while singing, rather than wait passively for it on the coast.
  • The protagonist of the short story "Le Jettatura" by Theophile Gautier does this after he believes he killed his girlfriend, since he thinks he has (and may or may not actually have) the Evil Eye, and blinded himself so as to avoid causing her harm only to find she was already dead.
  • The Kalevala: Aino drowns herself because she does not want to marry Joukahainen.
  • Long before the events of Ozma of Oz, King Ev sold his wife and kids to the Nome King in exchange for a longer life. He didn't realize until after the fact how horrible what he did was, and since he couldn't do anything to get them back, he threw himself into the ocean, wasting the very thing he'd sold his family for.

Live-Action Films
  • In the film The End a terminally ill man tries many ways to commit suicide. Ultimately it's walking into the ocean to drown that makes him realize he wants to live.
  • In The Face of Another (Japanese: Tanin no kao), the side-plot has a young woman and her brother live by the sea. Because of a disfiguring facial scar, she can't seem to have a fulfilled sex life. At one point she seduces her brother. Afterwards she dresses up and walks into the sea.
  • One adaptation of The Odyssey has Odysseus' mother do this when she fears he is dead. He later encounters her in the underworld.
  • On Her Majesty's Secret Service. Contessa Teresa "Tracy" di Vicenzo tries to commit suicide by walking into the ocean but is saved by James Bond. It was only one of her self-destructive behaviors, which included gambling with money she didn't have. Also occurs in The Film of the Book.
  • At the end of Point Break Bodhi paddles out to sea on his surfboard one last time to catch a once-in-a-lifetime wave. The area is surrounded by police and he will be arrested when he gets back to shore. It is fairly clear to the audience that he does not intend to come back.
  • A flashback to P.L. Travers' childhood in Saving Mr. Banks involves her stopping her mother from walking into a lake.
  • Norman Maine does this in A Star Is Born after his star fades and his depression worsens.

Live-Action Television
  • Parodied on one episode of The Daily Show when John Oliver visits Australia to find out how they passed tighter gun-control laws and concluding that American politicians would never have the guts, "so I'm going to walk into the ocean." The bit ends with him on a populous beach doing just that.
  • A character on Diagnosis: Murder commits this. As he does so, the footage freezes and turns black-and-white.
  • In The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin, Reggie fakes his death by leaving his clothes on the beach, making it look like he has committed suicide by walking out into the see.
  • The second episode of the The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series has a man walking naked into the sea throwing money away. He's played by Douglas Adams himself as the actor that should have done it called in sick.
  • In the Murdoch Mysteries episode "Loch Ness Murdoch", a woman walks into Lake Ontario with weights in her dress, because her fiance has left her for another woman.
  • In one episode of Reno 911!, Wiegel threatens to kill herself by walking out into the ocean, despite the state of Nevada being landlocked. Clemmy deadpans that Wiegel would be lucky if she could find her way to her own car, let alone the nearest coastline.
  • In the Scrubs episode "My Fishbowl" Elliot reveals she tried this during her Hilariously Abusive Childhood. She swam out into the middle of a lake and just floated, waiting to tire out and drown. Then she got whacked in the back of the head by all the oars of a passing rowing team who were training and was rescued without anyone knowing she was trying to drown herself.
  • The second season of Spooks ends with one of the main characters, fugitive from the law and with his career in shreds, walking into the sea. It's left ambiguous until the beginning of the next season whether this is a genuine suicide or a trick to evade his pursuers.

Music
  • Tom Waits subverts this in "The Ocean", where a man wants to drown himself but the ocean "doesn't want [him] today" implying he's unsuccessful.

Theatre
  • In the finale of Der Silbersee by Kurt Weill and Georg Kaiser, Olim and Severin attempt to drown themselves in the Silbersee, but the lake miraculously freezes over.
  • In Hamlet Ophelia falls into a lake and just kind of lets her self drown. A subplot was trying to determine whether or not it actually was suicide.
  • Peter Grimes: Rather than face a mob angry over the death of 2 apprentices, the titular character sinks his boat with himself in it.

Video Games
  • Kratos attempts this at the beginning of God of War. The rest of the game sets up How We Got Here.
  • In The Secret World, this is a recurring event related to Solomon Island:
    • It happened en masse when the Fog that followed the returning Lady Margaret swept over Kingsmouth Town, most of the inhabitants walked into the sea and drowned—only to return as a horde of zombies to prey on the survivors.
    • This is the final fate of Tyler Freeborn. Driven to find answers, he dons a respirator and walks into a shallow strait, intent on pushing through to whatever is at the heart of the Fog and knowing that he won't be returning.
    • The tragic end of the Norsemen who saved the Wabanaki during the Darkness War. Exposed to the Filth, they returned home only to succumb to madness and disease, leaving their blighted villages behind as they marched into the sea to serve their new masters.

Visual Novel
  • Narcissu: Setsumi decides to die by drowning rather than let her disease kill her.

Web Comics
  • In Bad Machinery, "The Case of the Fire Inside", Lorraine, an elderly woman with memory problems, mistakes a young selkie for her daughter, Ellen. She realizes the selkie's true nature eventually. When it comes time for the selkie to return to the ocean, Lorraine lies about being okay, and she walks into the ocean as soon as she's alone.
  • In an April Fool's comic for Gunshow the Anime Club plans to drive their car into the lake and all drown together.

Western Animation
  • Two dogs that escape from a research laboratory, Rowf and Snitter, try to live as feral dogs in Nepenthe Productions' The Plague Dogs. However, when animal control and the police converge upon the two dogs in an attempt to recapture them, Rowf and Snitter swim out to sea rather than go back to the horrors of the lab.
  • The Simpsons episode "Homer the Moe" has Moe's bartending professor die this way.
  • The Walt Disney Presents episode "The Goofy Success Story" has Goofy attempting to do this, when he is distraught at not receiving an Oscar, as a Shout-Out to A Star Is Born. Thankfully, he's saved when he gets a telegram offering him a big role.

Community Feedback Replies: 94
  • February 11, 2014
    DAN004
    Please flesh out the description, otherwise I'm not seeing suicide by falling over as meaningful.
  • February 11, 2014
    peccantis
    Seaside Suicide. I'll... go get my coat.
  • February 11, 2014
    Chernoskill
    Hum, doesn't the original Little Mermaid fairytale end like this, with the mermaid walking into the sea and dissolving into foam?
  • February 11, 2014
    DRCEQ
    I don't think this is a bad idea for a YKTTW, but is this different enough from Murder Water?
  • February 11, 2014
    Arivne
    Literature
  • February 11, 2014
    paycheckgurl
    In Hamlet Ophelia falls into a lake and just kind of a lets her self drown. A subplot was trying to determine whether or not it actually was suicide.
  • February 11, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    Seconding Seaside Suicide. though if you like it longer Seaside Suicide By The Seashore.

    also, Seaside Suicide by itself already has an air of romantic/dramatic Death. because Rule Of Symbolism.

    "The tides shall carry my sorrows and life away,
    and the sea shall embrace my cold body
    as the memories of my past drift down below..."
  • February 11, 2014
    KingZeal
  • February 11, 2014
    XFllo
    Murder Water is very much different: the water itself has somehow developed a mind of its own and tries to kill someone.

    Description needs help, but I really like it as a subtrope of Driven To Suicide. I like Seaside Suicide for a name, but I think we might keep looking/brainstorming.
    Literature
    • In Kate Chopin's The Awakening, its protagonist Edna swims far into the sea and lets herself be drowned. It's quite symbolic as learning to swim and bathing in the sea meant a lot for her and unleashed her desires and creativity.
  • February 11, 2014
    SKJAM
    I'm blanking on the name, but there's a British sitcom that begins with the main character faking his suicide by drowning to take up a new life.
  • February 11, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    If you can't find a quote. add my little snippet but with better grammar.
  • February 11, 2014
    randomsurfer
    In the film The End a terminally ill man tries many ways to commit suicide. Ultimately it's walking into the ocean to drown that makes him realize he wants to live.
  • February 11, 2014
    peccantis
    Jumping off rocky cliffs into a raging stormy sea is about as romantic and dramatic as a suicide can get.

    • "White Pearl, White Oceans" by Sonata Arctica is about a man who spends his life guarding the lighthouse, but after one night of passion in the town gets robbed and beaten unconscious on the way back home, and a ship ends up crashing due to him not being there to tend the light. A couple of cruel twists later, he throws himself into the sea.
  • February 11, 2014
    Bisected8
  • February 11, 2014
    Generality
    This was popular in the Victorian era. Virginia Woolf killed herself by filling her pockets with stones and walking into a river. The protagonist of The Awakening ends the book by swimming into the sea until she is exhausted and drowns.
  • February 11, 2014
    randomsurfer
    Voyage Of The Dawn Treader: Depending on one's interpretation, Reepicheep the talking mouse is planning on doing this at the geographic end of the world in order to reach Aslan's Country.
    While I can, I sail east in the Dawn Treader. When she fails me, I paddle east in my coracle. When she sinks, I shall swim east with my four paws. And when I can swim no longer, if I have not reached Aslan's country, or shot over the edge of the world in some vast cataract, I shall sink with my nose to the sunrise and Peepiceek will be head of the talking mice in Narnia.
  • February 11, 2014
    XFllo
    @Generality: I've already listed The Awakening. :-) I think this should be No Real Life Examples Please (Driven To Suicide is listed on the index). (And Virginia Woolf is a generation older than Viictorians —she died 1941. )
  • February 11, 2014
    peccantis
    My Fair Lady and Upstairs Downstairs both mention drowning in the Thames as a popular way of suicide.
  • February 11, 2014
    Generality
    ^^ Yes, I was thinking of Emily Dickinson, though they had nothing to do with one another.
  • February 11, 2014
    oneuglybunny
    Western Animation
    • Two dogs that escape from a research laboratory, Rowf and Snitter, try to live as feral dogs in Nepenthe Productions' The Plague Dogs. However, when animal control and the police converge upon the two dogs in an attempt to recapture them, Rowf and Snitter swim out to sea rather than go back to the horrors of the lab.
  • February 11, 2014
    IuraCivium
    Film
    • One adaptation of The Odyssey has Odysseus' mother do this when she fears he is dead. He later encounters her in the underworld.

    Live Action TV
    • A character on Diagnosis Murder commits this. As he does so, the footage freezes and turns black-and-white.
  • February 12, 2014
    eroock
    This may tie in with The Dying Walk to some degree.
  • February 16, 2014
    XFllo
    Bumping (and noting that phrases like "she does this" are Zero Context Examples and not allowed).
  • February 16, 2014
    Earnest
    For a similar alliterative trope, see Suicide By Sunlight.
  • February 16, 2014
    oneuglybunny
    Film
    • Midshipman Hollom has been labeled a Jonah by the crew in Master And Commander The Far Side Of The World as a result of the Surprise's disastrous first encounter against the Acheron while Hollom was on watch. Not wanting to live as a pariah among the surly crew, Hollom hefts a cannonball, bids fellow Midshipman Blakeney godspeed, then steps off the deck of the Surprise, sinking into the depths of the Pacific.
  • February 16, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    Xfilo
    Bumping (and noting that phrases like "she does this" are Zero Context Examples and not allowed).

    ....This brings me to tears. someone else actually knows these are Zero Context Example.

    Added some details in the OP. since "someone commits suicide by drowning" is People Drown Themselves on it's own.
  • February 16, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ That was my very first post :P
  • February 16, 2014
    MetaFour
    In Bad Machinery, "The Case of the Fire Inside", Lorraine, an elderly woman with memory problems, mistakes a young selkie for her daughter, Ellen. She realizes the selkie's true nature eventually. When it comes time for the selkie to return to the ocean, Lorraine lies about being okay, and she walks into the ocean as soon as she's alone.
  • February 16, 2014
    Chabal2
    In the story Jettatura, the protagonist does this after he thinks he killed his fiancée (having come to believe he had a Deadly Gaze, and was actively causing harm whenever he looked at her). When he arrives having blinded himself, she's already dead, and is last seen heading resolutely into the sea.
  • February 16, 2014
    reub2000
    Literature
    • The Kalevala: Aino drowns herself because she does not want to marry Joukahainen.

    Theater
    • Peter Grimes: Rather than face a mob angry over the death of 2 apprentices, the titular character sinks his boat with himself in it.
  • February 17, 2014
    m8e
  • February 17, 2014
    Prfnoff
    In the finale of Der Silbersee by Kurt Weill and Georg Kaiser, Olim and Severin attempt to drown themselves in the Silbersee, but the lake miraculously freezes over.
  • February 17, 2014
    CrypticMirror
    @SKJAM you are thinking of The Fall And Rise Of Reginald Perrin, where that is exactly the method that Reggie Perrin chooses. The opening credits would show him running along the beach while stripping off then he swims out into the water a ways before swimming back.

    • In the NCIS episode "Agent Afloat" the plot is kicked off by the discovery of a neatly folded officer's uniform and name badge left on the back of an aircraft carrier, making it look like the officer in question has jumped off and committed suicide.

    • In the Scrubs episode "My Fishbowl" Elliot reveals she tried this during her Hilariously Abusive Childhood. She swam out into the middle of a lake and just floated, waiting to tire out and drown. Then she got whacked in the back of the head by all the oars of a passing rowing team who were training and was rescued without anyone knowning she was trying to drown herself.
  • February 18, 2014
    PistolsAtDawn
    Webcomic example: In an April Fool's comic for Gunshow the Anime Club plans to drive their car into the lake and all drown together.
  • June 30, 2014
    XFllo
    Le bump
  • June 30, 2014
    arbiter099
    • Tom Waits: Subverted in "The Ocean" where a man wants to drown himself but the ocean "doesn't want [him] today" implying he's unsuccessful.
  • June 30, 2014
    DAN004
    Expand the trope plz. Is somebody managing this?
  • June 30, 2014
    Synchronicity
    Does it have to be "walk peacefully" or does "jumping dramatically into the ocean" count:

    • Plenty of examples from Classical Mythology:
      • Upon learning of her husband's death, Alcyone tried to kill herself by throwing herself into the sea. Out of pity, the gods turned her into a kingfisher (the Halcyon is a specific genus). This is the origin of the trope "halcyon days," a week in winter during which her father Aeolus, god of winds, calmed the seas so she could lay her eggs.
      • Halia was a lover of Poseidon, who bore him many sons. Because of a slight to her, Aphrodite turned them mad and made them gangrape their mother. Halia threw herself into the sea out of grief.
      • Ino, queen of Thebes. Accounts vary on what caused her husband to kill her older son Learchus, but in an attempt to escape him Ino cast her and her younger son into the sea. She was then turned into a goddess.
      • Scylla (not to be confused with the more famous one) fell in love with Minos and helped him defeat her father. When he learned of her treachery, however, he rejected her and she killed herself by throwing herself into the sea. note 
      • Aegeus, father of Theseus, who mistakenly believed his son was dead, threw himself from his tower into the sea.
    (There are more, but I didn't really think them worth mentioning).

    • From A Song Of Ice And Fire: Ashara Dayne allegedly killed herself by jumping from a tower into the sea. The story is romanticized in-universe, as no one knows what caused her to kill herself (grief for her brother's death and/or the death of her illegitimate child seem to be the most popular). The fact that she was the Worlds Most Beautiful Woman only helped the romanticizing.
  • July 1, 2014
    foxley
    In The Fall And Rise Of Reginald Perrin, Reggie fakes his death by leaving his clothes on the beach, making it look like he has committed suicide by walking out into the see.
  • July 7, 2014
    XFllo
    Adding Up For Grabs tag.
  • July 7, 2014
    nielas
    • Invoked and subverted on Law And Order Criminal Intent when a chef is suspected of beating a restaurant critic to death. When his motorcycle is found abandoned on the beach, the initial assumption is that overcome with guilt he killed himself by walking into the sea. However, the detectives quickly dismiss this theory when they see the state of the abandoned motorcycle. In their experience, people who kill themselves this way do so because it does not leave a mess for other people to clean up. A person in that state of mind would not leave a prized possession like the expensive motorcycle just laying on the beach where it would be wrecked by the elements.
  • July 7, 2014
    nielas
    • At the end of Point Break Bodhi paddles out to sea on his surfboard one last time to catch a once-in-a-lifetime wave. The area is surrounded by police and he will be arrested when he gets back to shore. It is fairly clear to the audience that he does not intend to come back.
  • July 7, 2014
    DAN004
    Who wanna grab this?
  • August 1, 2014
    XFllo
    OK, I'll adopt this one. Now I'm maintaing other drafts, but I'll look into this one as well.
  • August 1, 2014
    Rotpar
    • In The Secret World, this is a recurring event related to Solomon Island:
      • It happened en masse when the Fog that followed the returning Lady Margaret swept over Kingsmouth Town, most of the inhabitants walked into the sea and drowned—only to return as a horde of zombies to prey on the survivors.
      • This is the final fate of Tyler Freeborn. Driven to find answers, he dons a respirator and walks into a shallow strait, intent on pushing through to whatever is at the heart of the Fog and knowing that he won't be returning.
      • The tragic end of the Norsemen who saved the Wabanaki during the Darkness War. Exposed to the Filth, they returned home only to succumb to madness and disease, leaving their blighted villages behind as they marched into the sea to serve their new masters.
  • August 1, 2014
    LordGro
    This needs to be clearer about what it is: About actual Suicides by Sea, or about (I quote) for someone "walk[ing] into a body of water" to a "calm, painless death", with dialogue or symbolism that uses "'drifting away' metaphors".

    Obviously not nearly every Suicide by Water involves these elements. Just a random example, in Master And Commander a suicidal officer jumps overboard while grasping a cannonball. There's certainly a Suicide By Sea, but literally nothing of the things the description says.

    If we are going by the definition set out by the description, then all examples of the form "throws herself into the sea" or "drowns herself" are invalid. The description defines a much narrower trope than that.
  • August 1, 2014
    XFllo
    I'd actually like to make this broad, something like Suicide By Drowning. The current definition is "x walks into sea" and it's quite narrow. Or is only the "walking into the sea" tropeworthy?
  • August 1, 2014
    DAN004
    Walking into the sea for suicide is raaaaaaare.

    Suicide By Drowning plz.
  • August 2, 2014
    DaibhidC
    • In the Murdoch Mysteries episode "Loch Ness Murdoch", a woman walks into Lake Ontario with weights in her dress, because her fiance has left her for another woman.
  • August 2, 2014
    XFllo
    But rare story-telling devices might be meaningful and have special sense. Suicide by Drowning might be just the same as Driven To Suicide or Seen It All Suicide. Though we do have a specific page for Ate His Gun.

    We just need to agree whether this deserves its own page.
  • August 4, 2014
    aurora369
    Isn't it a particularly bad way of suicide unless you can't swim? The self-preservation instinct will kick in and your body will start to swim whether you want it or not. Even if you cannot swim you may suddenly realize you actually can.
  • August 4, 2014
    CrypticMirror
    ^Drowning is a particularly bad way to go unless you can manage to convince your body to try and "breathe" water on the first go. It looks "romantic" because generally the water looks peaceful before you go in, and after you've gone under. People don't like to think about the bit inbetween, of course if your suicidal then your probably not going to be thinking entirely rationally at the time anyway. However, the idea is that you get far enough out/into the current so that even if panic makes you change your mind it is too late to do anything about it.

    We should include a link to Suicide Prevention as a matter of course when this launches.
  • August 4, 2014
    randomsurfer
    There's also a type where someone jumps off a bridge into a river or sea. The Golden Gate Bridge is often used both in fiction and real life.

    • The Simpsons: Homer tries to commit suicide by tying himself to a big rock and throwing it over the side of a bridge. Homer being Homer, he ties himself to the rock and then carries it to the bridge, where he finds an identical rock readily available.
  • August 6, 2014
    XFllo
    Hmm, it looks like people think it might deserve a page. I agree, Suicide Prevention link is a must if it launches. I'll try to shape the draft when I get to it.
  • October 4, 2014
    XFllo
    I quite forgot about this draft. Bumping for attention/examples/comments. I still mean to sponsor it unless somebody wants tograb it.
  • October 4, 2014
    Chabal2
    The protagonist of the short story Le Jettatura by Theophile Gautier does this after he believes he killed his girlfriend, since he thinks he has (and may or may not actually have) the Evil Eye, and blinded himself so as to avoid causing her harm only to find she was already dead.
  • October 4, 2014
    XFllo
    ^ Please note that "he does this" is Word Cruft (and often a Zero Context Example). What does he do? Drowns himself in the sea? Or lake? Or river? It was not decided how broad or narrow this trope is.:-)
  • October 4, 2014
    DAN004
  • October 4, 2014
    eowynjedi
    • Parodied on one episode of The Daily Show when John Oliver visits Australia to find out how they passed tighter gun-control laws and concluding that American politicians would never have the guts, "so I'm going to walk into the ocean." The bit ends with him on a populous beach doing just that.
  • October 4, 2014
    Desu_Ex
    • Visual Novel/Narcissu : Setsumi decides to die by drowning rather than let her disease kill her.
  • October 5, 2014
    XFllo
    ^ See Spoiler Policy. All-blanked examples are not useful to readers. All examples here are spoilers by default.

    Suicide by Drowning, I don't like that too much.
  • October 5, 2014
    aradia22
    I vote that we don't make this Suicide by Drowning as I think this is tropeworthy on its own. The visual image of someone walking into the sea to drown themselves or as a visual cue that they're contemplating it is common enough to be a trope. In Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar, Esther has been trying to commit suicide. After failing to hang/strangle herself because of her body's natural preservation instincts, she decides to swim so far out into the ocean that she won't be able to swim back. She chooses a large rock as a marker to swim to only to realize that if she reaches it, she'll simply climb on the rock. She tries to drown herself where she is but is unsuccessful.
  • October 5, 2014
    XFllo
    ^ That example should not be blanked either. :-) See Spoiler Policy.
  • October 5, 2014
    DAN004
    ^^ what, cuz drowning in bathtub or pool doesn't have as much dramatic oomph?
  • October 5, 2014
    CrypticMirror
    As a death trope, this should run with spoiler tags off and go on Spoilered Rotten. No white space needed.
  • October 5, 2014
    SWFMax
    Yes, this should go under Death Tropes if/when launched. Also, does jumping into a river count, from a height? Because that's what Inspector Javert does in most versions of Les Miserables.
  • October 5, 2014
    CrypticMirror
    Suicides by jumping is a tricky one, to my mind at least. Is the jumper hoping the fall kills them or the subsequent drowning? There are places where the easiest way to get into the water, or at least the most dramatic way, is with a nice drop so that would count. However, since it is well known that water is pretty much like concrete from high enough and in a lot of places the only high buildings are bridges then it is the splat not the splash that jumpers are aiming for.

    I'd say if we are aiming for aiming for the symbolism of the water taking someone, then we need to make that explicit in the description. I don't think there will be enough cases where it is ambiguous enough to worry too much about though. Basically the state of mind of most water suiciders is that water swallows all, and cleans all, before fading to peacefulness.
  • October 5, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ That means this trope would be really specific. Question is, is the specificity really necessary?
  • October 5, 2014
    CrypticMirror
    Yes. Yes it is. Tropes have to mean things to be tropes otherwise they are just things that happen. A character's actions have to have a meaning behind it in order that a character is committing a trope. Directors and writers have to be aiming for a specific imagery to convey something to the viewer/reader for it to be a trope. Unless it is specific we might as well just lump every instance of suicide from letting the water take them, to swallowing a load of pills into one big suicide trope. I think for this to be a valid trope it has to be about people letting the water take them.
  • October 5, 2014
    XFllo
    So we'll have three tropes?
    • Character walks/swims into the ocean
    • Character jumps into water from height
    • Character drowns himself — bathtub, lake, river, sea, whatever
    I kinda lean towards this option, each of these concept should go through its respective ykttw phase and if they're deemed tropeworthy, each would have a separate page.
  • October 5, 2014
    StrixObscuro
    Live Action TV
  • October 5, 2014
    aradia22
    I'm with Cryptic Mirror and X Fllo. I think the different kinds of deaths or attempted suicides can have different narrative purposes. For me The Awakening is a prime example of the character walks/swims into the ocean. It can be about freedom or hopelessness but it's kind of a more peaceful/passive act.

    Jumping from a great height is more active and dramatic.

    The specificity reflects different motivations, different character types, etc.

    I'm a little more unsure where the third option separates from the first two.
  • October 5, 2014
    PaulA
    I support suicide-by-walking-into-the-sea as a distinct trope from suicide-by-jumping-into-deep-water and other forms of seaside suicide.

    • The second season of Spooks ends with one of the main characters, fugitive from the law and with his career in shreds, walking into the sea. It's left ambiguous until the beginning of the next season whether this is a genuine suicide or a trick to evade his pursuers.
  • October 6, 2014
    Chernoskill
    • In Master And Commander, the incompetent Hollom kills himself by grabbing a cannonball and walking overbord when superstitious crewmen whisper that he is responsible for the HMS Surprise's misfortunes.
  • October 7, 2014
    XFllo
    OK, that's quite a few voices agreeing to have the split. Thanks, folks. :-) From now on, this draft will be about "walks/swims into the sea", and I'll start a separate draft about jumping.

    My instict tells me that the third option — "simple" drowning in a whatever body of water — might not be a specific trope. Just a way of Driven To Suicide with no special symbolism or meaning.
  • October 7, 2014
    SWFMax
    It depends on the adaptation of Les Miserables if Javert jumps from a height. For example, in Les Miserables 1998 the river is close to the ground, and he lets himself fall backwards. Does that count, then?
  • October 7, 2014
    Skylite
    Not sure if it quite fits this trope, but Barney Rubble almost jumped off a bridge with a rock tied to his ankle before he and Betty got to keep Bamm-Bamm.
  • October 7, 2014
    aradia22
    Can we get more examples put into the official draft so we can get a better idea of where the boundary is?

    Also, one more jump. The Les Miserables example reminded me that in some productions of Swan Lake either Odette or both Odette and Siegfried will commit suicide by jumping into the lake.
  • October 9, 2014
    eroock
    Film:
    • In The Face of Another (Japanese: Tanin no kao), the side-plot has a young woman and her brother live by the sea. Because of a disfiguring facial scar, she can't seem to have a fulfilled sex life. At one point she seduces her brother. Afterwards she dresses up and walks into the sea. We can safely assume, she made the decision to commit suicide even before making out with her brother.
  • October 9, 2014
    DAN004
  • October 10, 2014
    Spindriver
    As The Fall And Rise Of Reginald Perrin recognises, one thing about suicide by sea is that it often doesn't leave a body, which in turn means that it's a functional option for people trying to fake their suicide. Drive to a beach, leave your car behind and your clothes in a heap - and then sneak off with the spare clothes you brought and the fake ID you secretly acquired.

    This is such a cliche in its own right - pretty much a trope itself - that if I see a fictional story that begins with "heap of clothes found on beach", I'll usually bet with myself that the character is still alive; an actual death becomes a subversion.

    There is at least one quite famous Real Life example; British politician John Stonehouse. Conversely, the death by drowning (or possibly shark) of Australian politician Harold Holt was almost certainly not suicide, despite some wacky speculation and the lack of a body.
  • December 10, 2014
    Patachou
    I saw that Tom Waits example already being referenced, but I have one addition: The song is called "The Ocean Doesn't Want Me Today" from his album Bone Machine and it is indeed about a man contemplating killing himself off by walking into the ocean, but he decides the ocean "doesn't want him today".
  • July 17, 2015
    eroock
    There are enough example for this to go live, if only somebody took ownership.
  • July 17, 2015
    arbiter099
    ^^ Odd about that title. My copy of the album lists it as "The Ocean", http://www.tomwaits.com/ says it's "The Ocean Doesn't Want Me"
  • July 18, 2015
    henke37
  • July 18, 2015
    Chabal2
    It's mentioned that Discworld golems occasionally rebel by walking in a straight line into the sea. However, they're very hard to kill, have infinite patience and believe time is circular, so they're not so much committing suicide as they are waiting for that part of the seabed to become dry land again.
  • September 16, 2015
    gallium
    Bump. I'll take ownership of this one, if no one objects, mainly because I just watched The Face Of Another, a movie that uses this trope-to-be.
  • September 16, 2015
    Koveras
    ^ Go for it.

    Do you think these would count?

    • In the bleak ending of Far Rainbow, the Tester Group swims to their deaths into the approaching Wave (a colossal wall of negative energy spawned by a scientific experiment Gone Horribly Wrong) while singing, rather than wait passively for it on the coast.
    • In Welcome To The NHK, Misaki's mother committed suicide by leaping off a cliff into the sea. Multiple characters attempt to commit suicide in the same manner over the course of the series, including the lead couple in the ending.
  • September 16, 2015
    TheTitanPrince
    Literature
  • September 16, 2015
    gallium
    In accordance with the previously expressed consensus, which I agree with, I've only added examples where the character walks or swims out into the sea, not examples where the character jumps from a high place.
  • September 17, 2015
    Berrenta
    Only changes I made were simple touchups. For now, will contribute a hat.
  • September 17, 2015
    Bisected8
    RE: Metal Gear Solid:

    • In Metal Gear Solid 2, Otacon's step sister, Emma, signed up to work on a doomsday weapon to hurt him (the Emmerich's have an unfortunate history of developing nuclear weapons) because she felt he abandoned her when their father (Hal's biological father, her step-father) drowned in a pool accident. Naturally it was actually suicide (it wouldn't be here if it wasn't), but he was driven to it because Hal was having an affair with his step mother, and they didn't see him drowning himself because they were too busy in the act; hence why Hal couldn't face seeing EE again.
  • September 17, 2015
    Koveras
    I think it's time to launch this kaiju...
  • September 17, 2015
    gallium
    I'll try and get it launched on my lunch break in an hour or two.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=gi3rl116fo57v8622rqq2aaf