Created By: ShanghaiSlave on April 23, 2014 Last Edited By: DAN004 on December 8, 2014
Troped

Item Drop Mechanic

Enemies (in)explicably drop items the moment they die.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
DAN 004 wuz ere takin over ur druft


He turned into a meatbun. The Horror...

A gameplay element in video games where you can get items from fallen enemies. Typically it takes form of enemies fading and the drops simply appearing where they died.

Item drops often have fixed types within the game. Some of which are:
  • Experience: enemies turn into experience upon death.
  • Food: They turn to food which replenishes either Hit Points or Mana Meter.
  • Power Ups that increase your stats temporarily (such as attack or defense).
  • Ammo: More prevalent in FPS and other shooter games, where you can pick ammo from other enemies. Often a Universal Ammunition.
  • Equipments, such as weapon or armor.

Supertrope to the following:
  • Random Drop: where the items that are dropped are random, or some certain things only drop at a fixed chance.
  • Organ Drops: they vanish and sometimes inexplicably drop their guts.
  • Essence Drop: Their life force explode upon their death. (any example on this fits better there)
  • Money Spider: enemies drop currency when killed.
  • Impossible Item Drop: Enemies drop items they have no business even having on their person. (e.g., a Bat dropping a chainsaw.)
  • Power-Up Magnet: Despite the name, it actually can attract other kinds of drops as well.

Very prevalent in RPGs - in fact, the Ur-Example is Dragon Slayer, an Action RPG - but can appear in any other game genre.


Examples

    open/close all folders 
    Non Videogame Examples 

Webcomics
  • In San Three Kingdoms Comic, People dying and turning into meatbuns are a Running Gag. Taishi Ci in particular dies in page 192 and turns into one. Which was then eaten by Sun Quan who was beside him in his death bed.

    Videogame Examples 

Action Adventure

Action RPG
  • In Kingdom Hearts enemies explode into "prizes", which are categorized differently depending on games, but the staples are treasure (which could be spells or weapons or crafting materials), HP, MP, and Munny.
  • Variant in Mega Man Battle Network: In this case, you'll get some rewards whenever you beat a Random Encounter battle. Typically it's small amounts of Zenny, but sometimes it could be a Battle Chip, Bugfrags, or (if your HP's low enough) HP recovery. Some installable programs for Mega Man can turn any rewards into just zenny, or just battle chip.

Beat 'em Up

Driving Game
  • In Carmageddon, each pedestrian the protagonist reckless driver wastes during a race — "drops" some in-game money as well as adds some extra time to spend.
  • In Vigilante 8, destroying your enemy vehicles will make them drop their current weapons as well as some buffs (such as endurance or speed).

Fighting Game
  • In Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS, defeated enemies in the Smash Run mode drop power-ups that increase your speed, jump height, attack, special attack, projectile, item attack, and throw strength, and defense in the post-adventure course match.

First-Person Shooter
  • In Doom II, enemies will drop medkits and/or ammo. Even from the demonic enemies.

Platform Game
  • Mega Man series
    • Mega Man (Classic): enemies will sometimes drop weapon energy or health energy. Same goes to Mega Man X.
    • Mega Man Zero omits the weapon energy but adds E-crystals to the mix. The first three games also have some Cyber Elves dropped from certain enemies, while the third and fourth game adds Data Disks.
      • Mega Man ZX follows the above, but with weapon energy added again.
  • The NES Metroid manual stated Samus's suit was able to take the power of "his" enemies. Regular enemies turned into health or missile pickups but bosses did not, recharging her ammo automatically on death. Later games would just make bosses drop larger amounts of pickups. All but two enemies encountered in Metroid: Fusion are duplicates created by X parasites, whom became living pickups that flee from you once the false body is destroyed. In Metroid Prime 3: Corruption, the nature of the drops change as with Samus's condition.
  • In Mini Ninjas, defeated enemies turn into animals (whom you can possess with a special spell and use it to sneak around) and also drop glowing orbs that increase your experience.
If you're looking for some straight Sonic the Hedgehog examples, I've got plenty.
  • In Sonic 3D Blast, destroying a robot will set a Flicky free. These are needed to get through the goal rings. In Panic Puppet Zone Act 3, however, the Flickies are in capsules. The game's manual explains that Sonic got to that zone early enough and as a result, Robotnik didn't have time to put the Flickies in the robots.
  • In Sonic Adventure, destroying a robot will release a small animal inside, much like the classic Genesis games. However, these small animals can be taken to the Chao Garden and used to improve your Chao's stats, depending on the color (Red for Strength, Yellow for Swim, Green for Speed, and Purple for Flight).
  • Sonic Adventure 2 retains this feature with Dr. Robotnik's robots and expands upon it with the G.U.N. robots. Destroying a G.U.N. robot releases a Chaos Drive, which, like the animals, increases your Chao's stats depending on the color.
  • In Sonic Heroes, destroying one of the more powerful enemies in the game will release a colored sphere. These spheres will upgrade your teammate's stats depending on the color (Blue for Speed, Red for Power, and Yellow for Flight).
  • In Shadow the Hedgehog, an enemy carrying a weapon will drop their weapon if Shadow defeats them. Shadow can then collec the weapon and use it against other enemies.

Real-Time Strategy
  • In Sacrifice, killed creatures leave "souls" behind for any wizard to gather and use in summoning something new. The souls left by creatures that belonged to other wizards — appear red in color, which means they would take longer to collect.

Roleplaying Game
  • In Neverwinter Nights 2, defeated enemies lie as corpses for some time, but eventually turn into loot bags containing their stuff. It makes it difficult to tell which bag belonged to who...

Third-Person Shooter

Wide Open Sandbox
  • In Grand Theft Auto games, beating people to death/unconsciousness will make them drop money and sometimes weapons and ammo.
Community Feedback Replies: 59
  • April 23, 2014
    DAN004
    Drop The Money is Money Spider.
  • April 23, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^ Damn, stupid Winding description. gonna bring that up to Trope description improvement.
  • April 24, 2014
    DAN004
    • Mega Man series
      • Mega Man Classic: enemies will sometimes drop weapon energy or health energy. Same goes to Mega Man X.
      • Mega Man Zero omits the weapon energy but adds E-crystals to the mix. The first three games also have some Cyber Elves dropped from certain enemies, while the third and fourth game adds Data Disks.
        • Mega Man Zx follows the above, but with weapon energy added again.
  • April 24, 2014
    needsanewhobby
    Isn't this a Missing Supertrope to the stuff listed in the "related tropes" section?
  • April 24, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ exactly.
  • April 24, 2014
    Arivne
    The picture is so long that it's overwriting the rest of the YKTTW.

    • Added a line separating the Description and Examples sections.
    • Added a space between the * and the first word of examples.
    • Namespaced and italicized work name(s).
    • Added blank line(s) for readability.
  • April 24, 2014
    DAN004
    Title should be Videogame Item Drop System. Or change "system" to "mechanic".
  • April 24, 2014
    partner555
    I can't believe we don't have this. It is such a common feature in videogames.
  • April 24, 2014
    needsanewhobby
    ^Probably the reason is that people are so used to the item drop system that they fail to even recognise it as a trope.
  • April 24, 2014
    DAN004
  • April 24, 2014
    StarSword
    ^The term you're searching for is Omnipresent Trope. I would say not allow straight examples on this page. Parodies and so forth are fine.
  • April 24, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^ I'd include Justified Trope on that. there are still lots of good reasons for this trope to be in play.
  • April 24, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    Uh, anyone here know which game first had enemies dropping items when killed?
  • April 24, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    Damn, stupid image really is too long.

    Shanghai Slave Box

    anybody got any idea how to trim it down a bit? I really like this image. unless someone has something better that isn't a duplicate of Impossible Item Drop.
  • April 24, 2014
    DAN004
    You sure it is omnipresent? This would be omnipresent if you don't care about puzzle games, party games and such...
  • April 25, 2014
    IndirectActiveTransport
    It is not an omnipresent trope because there games where you don't kill your enemies, the first Super Smash Bros comes to mind. Melee had "kill able" enemies but they did not drop anything...alright an actual example.

    • The NES Metroid manual stated Samus's suit was able to take the power of "his" enemies. Regular enemies turned into health or missile pickups but bosses did not, recharging her ammo automatically on death. Later games would just make bosses drop larger amounts of pickups. All but two enemies encountered in Metroid Fusion are duplicates created by X parasites, whom became living pickups that flee from you once the false body is destroyed. In Metroid Prime 3: Corruption, the nature of the drops change as with Samus's condition.
  • April 25, 2014
    bitemytail
    ^^^ remove the middle panel?
  • April 25, 2014
    needsanewhobby
    Answering the above question, Metroid may not be the Ur Example but it is likely the Trope Codifier.
  • May 1, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    solved in the forums. the mystery of the Ur Example. will edit in gathered information tomorrow.
  • June 24, 2014
    DAN004
    I make the mention of enemy vanishing etc more simplistic.

    And more RPG examples plz? Pretty sure there are many of them.
  • June 24, 2014
    Alvin
    Does the Live Action Film Scott Pilgrim Vs The World: the Seven Evil Exes explode into piles of coins when killed, go here or Money Spider or what?
  • June 24, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    Money Spider, this is a Super Trope after all, it'd be redundant to list that here too.

    @DAN 004, Since my balls are in your court now, and you have grabbed them. Add in Lemurian's post in this thread. It's the Ur Example for this one.
  • June 26, 2014
    StraightFlame
    The Underlings in Homestuck explode into grist when they're defeated. Does that go here or on Money Spider? I'm asking because grist is a resource that behaves a lot like money, but actual money is also a thing that exists and it's used in shops whereas grist isn't.
  • June 26, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ How exactly is grist used In Universe? Maybe give me an example.
  • June 26, 2014
    TheTitan99
    Possible page quote, depending if coins and such count:

    "For some reason, coins appear when you smash enemies! For some other reason, crystals float around in the stages! Don't think about it too hard, Einstein! There are some supernatural phenomena in the world that just can't be explained!!"

    ... I have come to the conclusion that I spent too much time reading these manuals when I was younger since I just knew this quote was there...
  • June 27, 2014
    StraightFlame
    @DAN004 First, just so you know, grist is not a tangible thing in-universe, and neither does it exist within the lore of Sburb (the "game" the webcomic is about).

    Grist is used for two things. The first use for it is to build on one's house (similar to The Sims) and place certain game objects, such as the machines used for Item Crafting.

    Speaking of crafting, that's the second use for grist. Due to the way crafting works (it's based on punch cards) you don't actually need to craft things using the items themselves, so instead, several types of grist are used as crafting ingredients.

    (And just so you know, Sburb's Global Currency, Boondollars, is gained as a reward for leveling up, or by completing sidequests.)
  • June 27, 2014
    Mr.Movie
    So this is sort of like a missing supertrope?
  • June 27, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ technically, yeah.
  • June 29, 2014
    DAN004
    Buuuuump
  • June 30, 2014
    NemuruMaeNi
    Bump what? It does's not even look remotely serious.

    This trope candidate can't encompass both Power Up Magnet (you have an option of juggling what dropped from an enemy) and Organ Drops (organs are loot or loot is organs) as sub-tropes with such a description.

    Does Experience have to be called an item... drop?

    "RPGs" leave a wrong impression on wikiword parser.

    Possible pieces to mention/explore: Standard RPG Items, Vendor Trash, Video Game Items And Inventory, Video Game Rewards.
  • June 30, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^ yes. experience are sometimes dropped as books/scrolls/items in some videogames.

    you can't have Power Up Magnet if enemies don't turn into powerups in the first place.

    Organ Drops... now that's questionable, i haven't really played a game where enemies explode and turn to guts, but it's gotta be there somewhere.
  • June 30, 2014
    NemuruMaeNi
    ^ The Sonic games (at least in 16-bit SEGA installments) magnetic field pulls nearby rings, which aren't dropped by enemies, but are placed arbitrarily by level designers, so yes you can.

    Please do not assume I was offering a recipe to finally nail a near-perfect text by discarding one of the two things mentioned. I'm rather thinking that description is very much below par, the conflicted part is but a signal that large-scale adjustments are needed.
  • June 30, 2014
    SpiderRider3
    This is pretty much any game where killed enemies drop stuff.

    In Minecraft killed mobs immediately turn into their loot.
  • July 2, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^^ I was saying that Power Up Magnet wouldn't be a relevant subtrope for this if the game didn;t have this in play.

    • in other words, sonic wouldn't be an example for what you said
    • but Megaman Legends which has the "vacuum arm" for collecting scattered refractors from fallen enemies would.
  • July 3, 2014
    DAN004
    Bump
  • July 7, 2014
    oneuglybunny
    FPS
    • Grunt soldiers felled in id software's Doom series fall supine and leave a clip of five bullets to retrieve. Shotgun sergeants fall supine and leave their shotgun with four salvageable cartridges. Chaingun Carls crumple in a heap leaving a rotary gun with ten usable bullets. Averted with the cyberdemon, who fires rockets at the player, but explodes when defeated, destroying his launcher and rockets as well. Also averted with the arachnotrons, which rapid-fire plasma bolts at the player, but collapse into piles of junk and gristle with no salvageable energy cells.

    Roguelike
    • A risky strategy in the text-based DOS game Wizard's Castle involves attacking a vendor to attain the best armor (plate), the best weapon (sword), a strength potion (equivalent to health boost), an intelligence potion (spell casting), a dexterity potion (dodge attacks), and a lamp to peer into neighboring rooms rather than blindly stumble into them. Otherwise, the player must slay monsters of varying durability to loot their gold to buy these items at exorbitant prices.
  • July 7, 2014
    NemuruMaeNi
    If it is a missing supertrope, then its laconic is misleading. It implies one of key points to be dead enemies visually "turning into" or "exploding" into items. Which means that an occasion of someone being killed that leaves behind a body to be searched for loot (no matter what loot exactly) doesn't fit the laconic description. Among other things, quite a few cases of examples context then turns out to be lacking, not explaining whether enemies explode or transform some other way.

    edit/upd: Page image fuels the same problem.
  • July 7, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ the "explode" part was what the original sponsor wrote before I took over. Yeah, I though that part is unimportant.

    Gonna change it later.
  • July 8, 2014
    DAN004
    Bump?
  • July 8, 2014
    NemuruMaeNi
    What do you mean by automatically getting items from fallen enemies?
  • July 12, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ What "automatically"?
  • July 14, 2014
    NemuruMaeNi
    ^ The one that you edited out. If you click the book icon next to the ykttw title, you'll see that "automatically" has been there in the second-to-last version. And main screen of ykttw says it was last edited by DAN004.

    But you didn't mean to ask that. It looks more like a bump-slash-bait into further walking through the hijack of inital idea into a hard-to-comprehend direction.

    Does This Count
    • In Carmageddon, each pedestrian the protagonist reckless driver wastes during a race — "drops" some in-game money as well as adds some extra time to spend.
  • July 14, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ that counts.
  • July 15, 2014
    NemuruMaeNi
    • In Sacrifice, killed creatures leave "souls" behind for any wizard to gather and use in summoning something new. The souls left by creatures that belonged to other wizards — appear red in color, which means they would take longer to collect.
  • July 23, 2014
    DAN004
    What else is needed?
  • July 31, 2014
    NemuruMaeNi
    The name and laconic are counterintuitive in regards to description. One thing or the other could benefit from being adjusted. For example, experience points are not an item, ask anyone.

    Since tropes are tools, they should have a purposeful use. What purposes would using this proposition fulfill — is entirely in the dark. Bonus points (on weirdness scale) for item-drop mechanics being something extremely common, to the point of being omnipresent in some genres (or perhaps even an indicative trait of those genres).
  • July 31, 2014
    ZuTheSkunk
    • In Mini Ninjas, defeated enemies turn into animals (whom you can possess with a special spell and use it to sneak around) and also drop glowing orbs that increase your experience.

    • In Neverwinter Nights 2, defeated enemies lie as corpses for some time, but eventually turn into loot bags containing their stuff. It makes it difficult to tell which bag belonged to who...
  • August 1, 2014
    Lugia2453
    Action Adventure

    Fighting Game
    • In Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS, defeated enemies in the Smash Run mode drop power-ups that increase your speed, jump height, attack, special attack, projectile, item attack, and throw strength, and defense in the post-adventure course match.
  • August 9, 2014
    DAN004
    Bumpeth
  • August 16, 2014
    BaffleBlend

  • September 5, 2014
    DAN004
    pmub
  • September 5, 2014
    hbi2k
    Does this need examples? It seems like all of the examples fit under one or more of the subtropes.

    Does the title really need "Videogame" in it? Most gameplay tropes are pretty easy to spot as such without needing an additional signifier in the trope title. "Item Drop Mechanic" is sufficient, I think.
  • September 5, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ I see.
  • September 16, 2014
    DAN004
    pmub
  • September 16, 2014
    FlyingDuckManGenesis
    If you're looking for some straight Sonic The Hedgehog examples, I've got plenty.
    • In Sonic 3 D Blast, destroying a robot will set a Flicky free. These are needed to get through the goal rings. In Panic Puppet Zone Act 3, however, the Flickies are in capsules. The game's manual explains that Sonic got to that zone early enough and as a result, Robotnik didn't have time to put the Flickies in the robots.
    • In Sonic Adventure, destroying a robot will release a small animal inside, much like the classic Genesis games. However, these small animals can be taken to the Chao Garden and used to improve your Chao's stats, depending on the color (Red for Strength, Yellow for Swim, Green for Speed, and Purple for Flight).
    • Sonic Adventure 2 retains this feature with Dr. Robotnik's robots and expands upon it with the G.U.N. robots. Destroying a G.U.N. robot releases a Chaos Drive, which, like the animals, increases your Chao's stats depending on the color.
    • In Sonic Heroes, destroying one of the more powerful enemies in the game will release a colored sphere. These spheres will upgrade your teammate's stats depending on the color (Blue for Speed, Red for Power, and Yellow for Flight).
    • In Shadow The Hedgehog, an enemy carrying a weapon will drop their weapon if Shadow defeats them. Shadow can then collec the weapon and use it against other enemies.
  • September 29, 2014
    DAN004
    Pmub
  • October 8, 2014
    DAN004
    Hats?
  • October 9, 2014
    hbi2k
    Fixed a Red Link in the description and put the Wide-Open Sandbox section in the Video Games folder. Hope you don't mind.

    Hatted.
  • October 27, 2014
    DAN004
    Final bump.

    What would be the indices?
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=g5gd952q8q577rnnueog4r3q