Created By: 1810072342May 12, 2013 Last Edited By: ArivneMay 15, 2013

Bagging Rights Comparison

Everyone compares their reasons to kill the bad guy

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Well, you can't all kill him.
Nimby, Back To The Divide.

Big Bad guys, as you might have guessed, do not make friends easily. If they are a particular Complete Monster, they will torture, harm and slaughter anyone they feel like. Unfortunately, this may prompt the nearest and dearest of the tortured/harmed/slaughtered to come after them with a vengeance.

So if you do this to lots of people, and they all catch up to you at once, the fun starts.

If the bad guy has been caught in a corner and all their enemies are arguing over who deserves to kill him the most, well, you get this trope.

When providing examples, feel free to list all the characters who want a go at the bad guy but don't list their reasons if they contain significant spoilers. Also, this trope is for when the good guys (or bad guys, for that matter) argue about who has the best reason to want to kill the enemy, not just saying 'this guy has a lot of people out to kill him'.

Compare The Only One Allowed To Defeat You. No relation to Bragging Rights Reward.

Up For Grabs.

---

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: Literature]]
  • The page quote comes from Back To The Divide, where Grimspite, Pewtermane, Thornbeak, Ironclaw, Felix, Harshak and Turpsik all argue over who gets to have their way with the captured Snakeweed.
  • In Mariel of Redwall, everyone gives a different reason for why they should be the one to kill the searat Gabool the Wild: Rawnblade because it's his duty to kill searats, Joseph because he swore to do so when he thought his daughter had been murdered by Gabool, Mariel (Joseph's daughter) out of vengeance, Dandin because he has Martin's sword and must kill evil with it, and finally Durry threatens to scrag him to break up the tension. Tarquin completely ends it by striking a noble pose and asking to have a chance to beat Gabool over the head with his harolina since there won't be much left afterwards.
  • Frank Herbert's Dune. Near the end Gurney Halleck wants to kill Feyd-Rautha Harkonnen as payback for all the suffering he endured in the Geidi Prime slave pits and the loss of his sister. Paul Atriedes counters that the Harkonnens killed his father, Duncan Idaho and Thufir Hawat, and forced him into the life of a fugitive. Interestingly, Feyd-Rautha never actually had anything to do with what the Harkonnens did to either Paul or Gurney.
  • Downplayed example: In Mockingjay, the last of the Hunger Games trilogy, Katniss and Coin have an altercation about who should kill President Snow.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Western Animation]]
  • Shortly before Mr. Burns is shot towards the end of an episode of The Simpsons, a succession of characters shout about why they're angry at him (conveniently giving us a long list of suspects for the next episode). The list includes Principal Skinner, Willie, Tito Puente, Moe, Barney, Bart, Smithers and Homer (and Marge, who is angry that he's making them all shout like this).

Going Up For Grabs.
Community Feedback Replies: 12
  • May 12, 2013
    StarSword
    Love the punny title.
  • May 12, 2013
    Duncan
    Compare The Only One Allowed To Defeat You. They may all think this about their common enemy.
  • May 12, 2013
    DracMonster
    This could also apply to a Villain Team Up against the hero (in fact, villains would be more likely to get into an argument, I'd think.) I'd expand it to a True Neutral trope.
  • May 12, 2013
    1810072342
    Also, the pun is neat but probably in bad snowclone territory, its rather obtuse if you dont know about Bragging Rights Reward.

    Who Gets To Defeat Him Argument perhaps? Not very elegant but I cant think of anything more succinct.
  • May 12, 2013
    1810072342
    I actually didn't think of punning Bragging Rights Reward. Just that when people talk about who has the rights to something like this they talk about 'bagging rights'.
  • May 12, 2013
    StarSword
    Yeah, this is related to Bragging Rights Reward only insomuch as they both involve the right to do a word starting with "b" and ending in "-agging". It's not a snowclone.
  • May 12, 2013
    Chabal2
    In Mariel of Redwall, everyone gives a different reason for why they should be the one to kill the searat Gabool the Wild: Rawnblade because it's his duty to kill searats, Joseph because he swore to do so when he thought his daughter had been murdered by Gabool, Mariel (Joseph's daughter) out of vengeance, Dandin because he has Martin's sword and must kill evil with it, and finally Durry threatens to scrag him to break up the tension. Tarquin completely ends it by striking a noble pose and asking to have a chance to beat Gabool over the head with his harolina since they're won't be much left afterwards. In the end, Gabool is killed when Rawnblade throws his pet scorpion at him, though Dandin kills the scorpion.
  • May 13, 2013
    Arivne
    Literature
    • Frank Herbert's Dune. Near the end Gurney Halleck wants to kill Feyd-Rautha Harkonnen as payback for all the suffering he endured in the Geidi Prime slave pits and the loss of his sister. Paul Atriedes counters that the Harkonnens killed his father, Duncan Idaho and Thufir Hawat, and forced him into the life of a fugitive. Interestingly, Feyd-Rautha never actually had anything to do with what the Harkonnens did to either Paul or Gurney.
  • May 13, 2013
    InkWeaverabc
    (new troper here, still working out how stuff works, sorry!) In Mockingjay, Katniss and Coin have a brief altercation about whether Katniss has more right to kill Snow than Coin. Does this count?
  • May 13, 2013
    StarSword
    ^Looks like.
  • May 13, 2013
    1810072342
    ^^ Good enough, although I'm tempted to call Downplayed Trope.
  • May 15, 2013
    WeAreAllKosh
    Live-Action TV

    In the Babylon 5 episode "Deathwalker", a Dilgar war criminal with the eponymous moniker, who conducted cruel medical experiments on conquered populations in the Dilgar War, surfaces from hiding and arrives on the station with an anti-aging serum that offers the promise of immortality. Conflict over her fate ensues among different parties over interest in her invention versus the need for justice. The Narn and the Earth Alliance governments are both interested in making a deal with her for her invention; at least one individual Narn (Na'Toth, who tried to kill her on the station) has sworn a blood oath against her to avenge relatives who were victims of her atrocities; the League of Nonaligned Worlds members (who bore the worst brunt of Dilgar aggression in the war) demanded that she face trial (and argued among themselves who had the most right to her custody); and the Centauri and Minbari governments voted against trying her to prevent secrets getting out about past involvement with the her or the Dilgar by their governments. In the end, the Vorlons (who were silent on the issue throughout the episode) sent a warship to Babylon 5 space and blew up her ship as it was departing for Earth. Said Ambassador Kosh on the matter: "You are not ready for immortality."

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable