Created By: CosmeF on April 6, 2013 Last Edited By: CosmeF on April 27, 2013
Troped

Removed Achilles Heel

a character missing a weakness or limitation that should have

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Trope
A common trait of monsters is the Weaksauce Weakness that allows humans to face them. After all, if monsters are so powerful and scary how come that they haven't already took over us? Thus, fairies are repelled by iron, demons run away in fear before a drop of Holy water, vampires can't stand sunlight, werewolves only roam when there's a full moon, and so on. Not only monsters have this problem, very often characters that are too powerful are bound to have a restriction that, if they're villains, gives the Hero a chance against them and, if they're heroes, prevents them from being too boring to watch.

It follows that a villain with a weakness that both the Heroes and audience is familiar with, will instantly become a bigger threat if said character gets it removed. Feel sorry for its enemies if their main strategy is Attack Its Weak Point.

The weakness doesn't necessarily have to be a Kryptonite Factor, it could be a well known flaw that the heroes always exploit, like a detective that can always be sure that the criminal will left clues behind or that serial killers always follow a pattern that he can deduce to find them.

A character can achieve this through focused (and generally painful) training, get this status as a side effect of increasing their powers, thanks to magical or scientific experiments, by being Badass or just gifted. To remove a Kryptonite Factor, a recurrent method is exposing to small doses of it, in a similar fashion to characters with Acquired Poison Immunity.

Just to be clear, this trope doesn't cover cases when the author changes the character into not having a weak point it used to have, it only counts when it happens in-universe.

Compare with Fight Off the Kryptonite, when the character doesn't lose his weakness but tries to fight it through sheer will force, and Kryptonite-Proof Suit, where the character takes measures to avoid it. Similar to No Sell, but instead of ignoring other characters' powers, in this case what's ignored are the natural weaknesses.

Previous and Possible titles: Sunbathing Vampire, Acquired Weaksause Immunity, Applied Weaksauce Immunity, Standard Weaksause Immunity, Immune to Kryptonite, Doing in the Kryptonite


Examples:

Advertising
  • A commercial for Nutrigrain breakfast bars had a family of vampires. One of the vampires stated "Ve vere not morning people" until they discovered Nutrigrain bars--and showed them sitting at the table in sunlight having them for breakfast.

Anime And Manga
  • The Angels from Neon Genesis Evangelion had a Core that, if destroyed, would meant the Angel's destruction as well. But the eleventh Angel had a body made of nanoentities, meaning that it didn't have a core, at least not that the heroes could detect and destroy as usual, but it also had an Adaptive Ability that allowed it to learn and become immune to anything that they used against it.
  • Saiyans from DragonBall suffer an agonizing pain when their tails are squeezed. Goku used this against Raditz and Piccolo tried to do the same against Nappa, just to learn that he and Vegeta were inmune to this, the only apparent reason for that is that they were just too badass.
  • From Jojos Bizarre Adventure we have some examples:
    • First one, Cars, the Big Bad from Part 2, a vampire that became immune to both sunlight and the Ripple, the only two things that could kill them.
    • Second one, a villain from Part 4, the Big Bad Kira, was the first character with a stand that could operate regardless of distance, while the normal rule is that if there's a stand, its user is nearby. However, his stand had another limitations: it couldn't be controlled at will and Kira couldn't know what was it doing or seeing. He wasn't the last one.
    • And third, in both Part 4 and 5 there was a character whose stand would activate after the user's death, and since the only surefire way to destroy a stand was killing the user, they were impossible to destroy.
  • Walpurgisnatch from Puella Magi Madoka Magica, the only witch that could exist outside a barrier and therefore wreak havoc on the real world.
  • An episode of Pokémon featured a trainer that made one of her Steel Pokemons fight exclusively against Fire Pokemons until it overcame its weakness against Fire.
  • Yuugen Kaisha presents a literal example with Bosco, who did this by repeatedly exposing himself to highpowered UV lamps to gradually build immunity to sunlight, as part of his attempt to give up being a vampire, because he'd fallen in love with Makiko.

Comic Books
  • Kingdom Come: It is revealed early on that because of all the yellow solar rays Superman has absorbed at that point, he gained an eventual immunity to all forms of Kryptonite, making him effectively invincible to everything but magic.

Film
  • Becoming this is Deacon Frost's goal in Blade. Until he completes the dark ritual, he and his followers have to use a thick covering of sun lotion to survive in sunlight.
  • It happens in I, Robot , where everyone is pretty sure that robots would never attack a human due to their programming.
  • In during the climax of Underworld: Evolution, Selene gains immunity to UV radiation (and thus sunlight) by drinking Alexander Corvinus' blood and becoming a vampire-Immortal hybrid. As previously shown, even the most powerful vampires suffer lethal burns when exposed to sunlight.
  • Dracula in Van Helsing displays none of the weaknesses commonly associated with vampires; Anna mentions multiple weapons that have failed to destroy him in the past, he survives being staked through the heart onscreen, and uses a Cross-Melting Aura to destroy the silver crucifix Van Helsing threatens him with. Carl eventually figures out that the only thing capable of killing him is a werewolf.

Literature
  • The Yeerks' from Animorphs need to leave their hosts once very three days to absorb Kandrona rays with their real bodies, otherwise they die of starvation. In their planet, the Kandrona rays are generated by their sun, on Earth they have a secret base with an artificial generator.
    • A renegade Yeerk that couldn't afford to go back to the base found a way to survive anyway killing and eating a fellow Yeerk every three days.
    • In another book the Yeerks found a substitute for Kandrona that they could absorb without leaving the host's body, unfortunately it was highly addictive, hindered their ability to control the host, and could potentially drive them mad, replacing their original weakness with something worse.
  • Artemis Fowl: Demons, as a species, are no longer able to use magic after they reach their adult stage, called warping (warlocks are extremely rare, but don't warp). So when the Big Bad starts using magic despite being, in his own words, "such a magnificently warped creature"... it turns out there's an unconscious warlock's spirit inhabiting his body.
  • The Terry Pratchett book Carpe Jugulum has a family of vampires whose father has trained them all to be immune to sunlight and to not react to holy symbols or garlic, as one is just a collection of lines and curves and the other is merely a member of the Allium family. This bites back hard at the end of the book, though, when the family can't stop seeing holy symbols everywhere. After all, they're just straight lines and curves...
  • In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Voldemort uses Harry's blood in a ritual to restore him to power, which also allows him to bypass the Power of Love protection bestowed on Harry by his mother's sacrifice.
  • Hercule Poirot once faced a killer that he couldn't gather evidence against because he didn't murder anyone, he subtly manipulated people with seemingly innocent remarks to hit their emotional buttons and push them into murdering. Poirot realized it but still was unable to bring the villain to justice, since none of his actions could be seem as a crime so he broke his moral code and killed the guy, lamenting how that, at the end, the villain even managed to make Poirot himself a murderer.
  • Saruman from The Lord of the Rings created a new breed of Orcs after his Face–Heel Turn, the Uruk Hai, that weren't weakened by sunlight unlike ordinary Orcs. They were also stronger and overall superior.
  • Twilight vampires feel a strong, almost uncontrollable urge for blood, the only exception being Bella after her Vampification in Breaking Dawn.
  • The clasic example in literature is Lestadt in Anne Rice's Vampire Chronicles series. Knowing the oldest and most powerful vampires can withstand full sunlight, he chooses to accelerate the process, despite only being two hundred years old, by facing down the sun at noon. In a desert. Although the experience nearly kills him, his body eventually regenerates into the appearance of a man with a deep, permanent, suntan.

Live Action TV
  • Given the amount of vampires in Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel, there's bound to be examples of vampires immune to their traditional weaknesses
    • One involved removing the vampire's heart surgically (which will kill him eventually, but renders him immune to vampire weaknesses until then).
    • Another example was when the Fang Gang goes to Pylea, Angel discovers that the dimension's sun doesn't harm him, allowing him to operate during the daytime.
    • Dracula went to Gypsies sometime in the 1800 and traded vampire secrets for protection from a few Vampire weaknesses. Such as now he cannot be killed by a stake through the heart.
  • For many seasons it was established on Supernatural that the special knives they had could kill any demon. Excepting any Satanic Kings Of Hell. However, a lady demon in season 8 just laughs off the knife wounds. (It was speculated that it was because the demon was really old, but it was never really addressed.)
  • True Blood: Sookie's blood, because of her fairy ancestry, has the power to give vampires this ability.

Video Games
  • One of the characters in Neverwinter Nights is secretly a werewolf, masquerading as a merchant and selling silver artefacts and wolfsbane herb to werewolf hunters. Not only does this keep suspicion away from him, but he also claims that exposing himself to his weaknesses in this way has allowed him to build up a tolerance to them.
  • Legacy of Kain:
    • Moebius has a sceptre that is enchanted to weaken any vampires he uses it against. Raziel is completely unaffected by the sceptre due to him being 'remade', and while Kain is initially affected by the sceptre, he discovers that he's become immune to its effects when Moebius tries to use it against him towards the end of Defiance (as a side-effect of Raziel ripping Kain's heart from his chest during a previous encounter).
    • And in Soul Reaver, the Rahabim Vampires have evolved into amphibians, overcoming their vampiric weakness to water in the process. By killing their leader Rahab and absorbing his soul, Raziel also overcomes this weakness.
  • In The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim's Dawnguard expansion pack, the vampire Lord Harkon intends to create a permanent eclipse to black out the sun, allowing his clan to hunt freely without being hindered by their weakness to sunlight.

Western Animation
  • The Blood Bending ability from Avatar: The Last Airbender allows Water Benders to control living beings using the water inside them, but it's only possible on a night with a Full Moon, when Water Bending is boosted. In the sequel, The Legend of Korra , a famous criminal surprised everyone performing Blood Bending without a Full Moon thanks to his unique genetics. His sons had the same ability.
  • Demona from Gargoyles gained the ability to turn into human during day, instead of turning into stone like her brothers. While she hates humans and therefore hates her daytime form, she became more dangerous by having daytime to do as she pleases while normal gargoyles sleep.
  • In Megamind , the eponymous character creates a new superhero using Metroman's genes. This new "hero", Titan, has the same powers as Metroman. That's why Megamind is shocked to learn that, unlike Metro Man, he's immune to copper. In this case, it hints at the fact that Metroman was never weak against copper to begin with, he merely faked it.
Community Feedback Replies: 68
  • April 6, 2013
    Astaroth
    Not to be confused with Daywalking Vampire. Probably needs No Sell bluelinked somewhere in the description.

    • One episode of Pokemon has a trainer who covered her Onix in wax to give it immunity to water.

    • In Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire, Voldemort uses Harry's blood in a ritual to restore him to power, which also allows him to bypass the Power Of Love protection bestowed on Harry by his mother's sacrifice.

    • One of the characters in Neverwinter Nights is secretly a werewolf, masquerading as a merchant and selling silver artefacts and wolfsbane herb to werewolf hunters. Not only does this keep suspicion away from him, but he also claims that exposing himself to his weaknesses in this way has allowed him to build up a tolerance to them.

    • Moebius in the Legacy Of Kain series has a sceptre that is enchanted to weaken any vampires he uses it against. Raziel is completely unaffected by the sceptre due to him being 'remade', and while Kain is initially affected by the sceptre, he discovers that he's become immune to its effects when Moebius tries to use it against him towards the end of Defiance (as a side-effect of Raziel ripping Kain's heart from his chest during a previous encounter).

    • In The Elder Scrolls V Skyrim's Dawnguard expansion pack, the vampire Lord Harkon intends to create a permanent eclipse to black out the sun, allowing his clan to hunt freely without being hindered by their weakness to sunlight.
  • April 6, 2013
    MiinU

    Anime

    • Yuugen Kaisha presents a literal example with Bosco, who did this by repeatedly exposing himself to highpowered UV lamps to gradually build immunity to sunlight, as part of his attempt to give up being a vampire, because he'd fallen in love with Makiko.

    note: since this example is already covered in detail on the work page itself, under Love Redeems, I figure this oughta be good enough, for when you Entry Pimp it.
  • April 6, 2013
    Tiiba
    In Blue Gender, the monsters that the heroes fought for most of the series had fully exposed, very fragile cores. Later ones had equally fragile, but protected cores. The ones at the end had no cores at all.

    In Dragon Ball Z, Saiyans can be completely incapacitated if someone grabs their tails, because it hurts like all hell. But Vegeta and Nappa have no such handycap.
  • April 6, 2013
    MiinU
    @Tiiba - Neither of those example explain what they did to become resistant to their weaknesses. Instead, it sounds as if their weaknesses simply stopped being an issue on their own.
  • April 6, 2013
    CosmeF
    Astaroth: I'll add the Daywalking Vampire reference and I'll see how to add the No Sell. Thanks for the examples, I'll add them except for the Onix one that seems more like a Kryptonite Proof Suit

    Miin U: Great example. About the Saiyans, I don't even know if someone tried to grab Vegeta or Nappa's tails, but if they tried and it didn't worked I think it should count. I hope Tiiba can clarify it. Not so sure about the other example, though I included a few similar examples: in the Evangelion example there's no explanation for the angel without core, and neither is a good explanation for the Legend of Korra example, the guy didn't do anything to overcome his problem, apparently he was just gifted.

    I should work more in the description, since it covers two situations slightly different: a character overcoming an Achilles Heel through training or any other external means, and a character that should have an Achilles Heel by virtue of his nature but is missing it. The importante thing is that both the characters and the audience would normally expect the Achilles Heel.
  • April 6, 2013
    WackyMeetsPractical
    Perhaps related to Took A Level In Badass? It's different, but I imagine they can overlap.
  • Web Comic
    • Vampire Girl plays this straight, because as a vampire, one thing that Levana wishes to do is go out into direct sunlight without having to worry about fatal consequences; when she becomes human, one thing she enjoys doing daily is going on long walks out in the sun.
  • April 7, 2013
    Arivne
    Comic Books
    • In one old Superman comic, the title character somehow overcame his weakness to Kryptonite, and was even able to eat it without ill effects.
  • April 7, 2013
    WackyMeetsPractical
    Found another related trope: Acquired Poison Immunity
  • April 7, 2013
    Stratadrake
    Let's try to avoid naming the trope after a specific example of itself, can we?
  • April 7, 2013
    CosmeF
    I admit that it is after a specific example, but I picked vampires have appeared in every medium, and the weakness against sunlight, even if it's not a constant in every work featuring vampires, it's a well known concept. But if you want to suggest another name, go ahead. I wanted to use something Kryptonite related, to keep with the theme of other related tropes.
  • April 7, 2013
    OmarKarindu
    The Superman example doesn't work; the comic in question has all of Earth's Kryptonite turning into iron due to some Applied Phlebotinum; it's iron that Superman eats after a stupid crook tries to use his recently-acquired (now transformed) Kryptonite on Supes.
  • April 7, 2013
    CosmeF
    Oh, thanks for the explanation. I was pretty sure that Superman had lost, at least temporarily, his vulnerability to Kryptonite at some point.
  • April 7, 2013
    dalek955
    See also Cross Melting Aura. Name suggestion: Acquired Weaksauce Immunity.
  • April 7, 2013
    MiinU
    ^@dalek955 - Their weakness usually isn't weaksauce though. In many cases, it's potentially fatal: like sunlight to vampires.
  • April 8, 2013
    Chernoskill
    • Becoming this is Deacon Frost's goal in Blade. Until he completes the dark ritual, he and his followers have to use a thick covering of sun lotion to survive in sunlight.
  • April 8, 2013
    WackyMeetsPractical
    ^^ @Miin U: That's the very definition of Weaksauce Weakness. Read the very first example. Vampires weakness against the sun is there.

    In any case, Acquired Weakness Immunity would be better.
  • April 8, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    Did some formatting. Also, please do something about those Jojos Bizarre Adventure examples. Examples that are completely covered with spoiler tags are practically useless. Tag only what's necessary and not the whole example. If you don't know which part to cover, consider reading this: Handling Spoilers.
  • April 8, 2013
    Alvin
    I think the Hercule Poirot example is incomplete, it should end with something like ".... so he breaks his own moral code and just shoots the guy.. Also, would this count? Live-Action TV: In a late episode of Deep Space Nine, the character Vic is involved in a resistance movement, which is a surprise because he's a Holosuite character, so shouldn't be able to do that.
  • April 8, 2013
    StarSword
    Did a page cleaning (namespaces, formatting, and a couple spelling mistakes). I also potholed "repelled by iron" in the description to Cold Iron, and added a hat.
  • April 8, 2013
    CosmeF

    Thanks for all your replies, about the format, even if I read a lot of articles, I mostly copied other YKTTW discussion formats. I'll read about the spoilers.

    About the examples, justanotherrandomlurker , I'm sorry, I forgot to answer you, if I understood it, in your example the vampire loses the weakness because it stops being a vampire. An important part of the trope should be that the character keeps being the same minus the weak point. Alvin, the Holosuite character may be a good example, but I think that taking the fact that is an hologram as the "weakness" would be stretching the definition too much.

    About the title, I like (and I think everyone will like it too) Acquired Weaksause Immunity, it's good and it's related to other well known trope, but since not all examples explain how did the character to lose the weak point, I'd leave it just like Weaksause Immunity.

  • April 8, 2013
    thewriter
    It sounds like there are actually two potential tropes here. Acquired Weakness Immunity where a character actually develops an immunity (whether intentional or accidental) to a natural weakness, and Applied Weakness Immunity where, despite the established rules of a certain work's universe, a character doesn't have an Achilles Heel they are supposed to have. (I actually don't like the name Applied Weakness Immunity, I just needed to call it something).

  • April 9, 2013
    AP
    Not always an inversion of Suicide By Sunlight.
  • April 9, 2013
    Stratadrake
    ^^ Phrasing it that way makes the latter seem like a snowclone of Our Monsters Are Different.
  • April 9, 2013
    Arby099
    Alternate name suggestion: Doing in the Kryptonite to clear up the vampire sunlight misleading issue
  • April 9, 2013
    DrakeClawfang
    Another note for the current Legacy of Kain example

    In Soul Reaver, the Rahabim Vampires have evolved into amphibians, overcoming their vampiric weakness to water in the process. By killing their leader Rahab and absorbing his soul, Raziel also overcomes this weakness.
  • April 16, 2013
    CosmeF
    I'm sorry, I've been too busy and forgot to keep checking this. I don't know about the title Doing In The Kryptonite, do you think it would be easily understood? If not, I think the best would just be stick to something like "Kryptonite Doesn't Work", even if it's dull. Last example added.
  • April 17, 2013
    AgProv
    The clasic sunbathing vampire in literature is Lestadt in Anne Rice's Vampire Chronicles series. Knowing the oldest and most powerful vampires can withstand full sunlight, he chooses to accelerate the process, despite only being two hundred years old, by facing down the sun at noon. In a desert. Although the experience nearly kills him, his body eventually regenerates into the appearance of a man with a deep, permanent, suntan.
  • April 17, 2013
    jokerisland
    In Andrzej Sapkowski's LadyOfTheLake, one of the characters (Regis) is hiding his vampire identity. Clearly, in Sapkowski's world, usual vampire repellants do not work.
    Regis gesticulated with a silver fork and argued the best remedy for vampires are silver, whose lightest touch is absolutely deadly to a vampire. What about garlic? Asked one of the ladies. Garlic is also effective; Regis went on, but socially awkward, because of the awful smell.
  • April 17, 2013
    Arivne
    Daywalking Vampire specifically covers all examples of vampires who are not harmed by sunlight, and is thus a Sub Trope of this one. All such examples should be added there.

    Vampires being immune to garlic, running water etc. would go here.
  • April 17, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    ^ Not always. If vampires simply are not harmed by sunlight in a given work, then it's a case of Our Vampires Are Different. Only if the known weakness is removed during the course of the work (or there are special monsters, that don't share the same weaknesses as their kin), should it be added to the examples.
  • April 17, 2013
    Astaroth
    • Dracula in Van Helsing displays none of the weaknesses commonly associated with vampires; Anna mentions multiple weapons that have failed to destroy him in the past, he survives being staked through the heart onscreen, and uses a Cross Melting Aura to destroy the silver crucifix Van Helsing threatens him with. Carl eventually figures out that the only thing capable of killing him is a werewolf.

    Edit: Come to think of it, how would Cross Melting Aura relate to this? Subtrope possibly?
  • April 17, 2013
    CosmeF
    I've been thinking and I'm not sure, but since Cross Melting Aura applies only to weaknesses related to holy or pure things, I'd say Sub Trope. But again, it's subtly different, a Cross Melting Aura equivalent would be a vampire that makes the sky dark with its presence.

    About Daywalking Vampire I added a line explaining a little how they're different, but I think it just derails the description. Another reason to change the name.

    And about the name, I noted I can change the name while editing, but should I change the name there or should I discard this YKTTW and create another one with the new name, saving the examples?

    Edit: The Lady Of The Lake example doesn't convince me. It looks like people just believe that silver and garlics work against vampires but they really don't. There's an example inside the work of vampires being hurt by silver or garlic? Also I revised the Dragon Ball example and I think it's a good example.
  • April 17, 2013
    WeAreAllKosh
    Advertising

    A recent commercial for Nutrigrain breakfast bars had a family of vampires. One of the vampires stated "Ve vere not morning people" until they discovered Nutrigrain bars--and showed them sitting at the table in sunlight having them for breakfast.
  • April 17, 2013
    CosmeF
    I found this: Only The Hero Is Immune . Though this considers different examples it looks pretty similar.

    Edit: Not sure about the advertising example, I'll add it because it's a funny example, even if it's a minor one.
  • April 17, 2013
    Koveras
    • In during the climax of Underworld: Evolution, Selene gains immunity to UV radiation (and thus sunlight) by drinking Alexander Corvinus' blood and becoming a vampire-Immortal hybrid. As previously shown, even the most powerful vampires suffer lethal burns when exposed to sunlight.
  • April 17, 2013
    originalhobbit
    • True Blood: Sookie's blood, because of her fairy ancestry, has the power to give vampires this ability.
  • April 18, 2013
    pcw2727
    • In season 1 of Falling Skies the 2nd Mass discovers a radio signal which disrupts alien communications. By the premiere of Season 2 the Aliens already know how to block this signal.
  • April 18, 2013
    Arivne
    ^ x 6 @TropersCosmeF: You can just change the name of this YKTTW proposal.
  • April 18, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    You got to rephrase that Advertising example, because Examples Are Not Recent.
  • April 18, 2013
    CosmeF
    Got it, Thanks

    ^^Ok, I'll directly change it here.
  • April 18, 2013
    Larkmarn
    • In Buffy The Vampire Slayer and Angel there have been a couple ways that made vampires immune to their traditional weaknesses. One involved removing the vampire's heart surgery (which will kill him eventually, but renders him immune to vampire weaknesses), and another was a mystical ring that simply made the vampire sunlight and stake-proof.
  • April 18, 2013
    MarqFJA
    IMO, given the way you differentiated this from Daywalking Vampire, it sounds like the latter should be the one to be renamed rather than the other way around, as its current name is inclusive of any isolated cases of vampires acquiring or being "born" with sunlight-immunity.

    Otherwise, another vote to Acquired Weaksauce Immunity and Applied Weaksauce Immunity being separate tropes.

    @Stratadrake: "^^ Phrasing it that way makes the latter seem like a snowclone of Our Monsters Are Different." But Applied Weaksauce Immunity is when only one member (or a very limited number) of the monster race is missing a weakness that everyone else has. Our Monsters Are Different and its subtropes are about the monster race's norm(s) being different, not about aberrations.

    @CosmeF: "And about the name, I noted I can change the name while editing, but should I change the name there or should I discard this YKTTW and create another one with the new name, saving the examples?"

    It's better if you simply change the name (and put the old name in the draft description for searching purposes until you actually launch the trope) rather than make a whole new draft.
  • April 18, 2013
    CosmeF
    Thanks for the new examples, but I didn't add the mystical ring example from Buffy because it sounded more like a Kryptonite Proof Suit example
  • April 18, 2013
    Larkmarn
    Ah, good call. Thanks. I forgot how broad that trope can be.
  • April 18, 2013
    randomsurfer
    Would this count? On Angel when Angel & the crew travel to the dimension of Pylea they get there during a bright, sunny day. Angel immedieately tries to duck under cover, until he notices that the sunlight isn't killing him. He absolutely revels in the sun, even temporarily forgetting their mission (to save Cordelia).
    Can everyone just notice how much fire I'm not on?
  • April 19, 2013
    chabal2
    Artemis Fowl: Demons, as a species, are no longer able to use magic after they reach their adult stage, called warping (warlocks are extremely rare, but don't warp). So when the Big Bad starts using magic despite being, in his own words, "such a magnificently warped creature"... it turns out there's an unconscious warlock's spirit inhabiting his body.
  • April 19, 2013
    MrRuano
    Kingdom Come: It is revealed early on that because of all the yellow solar rays Superman has absorbed at that point, he gained an eventual immunity to all forms of Kryptonite, making him effectively invincible to everything but magic.
  • April 19, 2013
    CosmeF
    About the Angel example three posts above, could someone elaborate the situation? I read a little the Angel article and for what I got, the thing is that the other dimension has a different sun.
  • April 19, 2013
    Larkmarn
    Yes, that's correct. It seems like it counts, since Angel loses his biggest weakness. Here's a modified version of the Buffy/Angel entry:

    • Given the amount of vampires in Buffy The Vampire Slayer and Angel, there's bound to be examples of vampires immune to their traditional weaknesses
      • One involved removing the vampire's heart surgically (which will kill him eventually, but renders him immune to vampire weaknesses until then).
      • Another example was when the Fang Gang goes to Pylea, Angel discovers that the dimension's sun doesn't harm him, allowing him to operate during the daytime.

  • April 19, 2013
    thewriter
    I still assert that there are actually two tropes here, or this trope should note two different types. As this YKTTW stands now, I find it to be a bit of a mess.

    • Type One would be where a character (perhaps part of a certain species) has an established Achilles Heel, but goes out of his way to actively become immune to it, or develops an immunity due to repeated exposure.
      Hypothetical Example: Early on in a work or series, it is established that the alien species of Troperians have a weakness to water. When Bob the Troperian first comes to Earth he reacts severely to the abundance of H 2 O, but after some time has passed Bob finds his self less effected by water as he's grown accustomed to its presence. This makes Bob unique to any other Troperians he may run into.
      • Here would land the above Angel/Buffy The Vampire Slayer example of vampires having their hearts removed in order to (temporarily) become immune to all vampire weaknesses.
      • Also from Buffy, Dracula went to Gypsies sometime in the 1800 and traded vampire secrets for protection from a few Vampire weaknesses. Such as now he cannot be killed by a stake through the heart.

    • Type Two would be when a new character (or a returning previously seen character) has an immunity to a weakness that had already been established 'in-universe in a preceding installment. Usually to showcase how threatening a villain is. Usually this is a problem with a work's consistency, will maybe feel like an Ass Pull, and will be Hand Waved as the villain just being that evil or Badass.
      Hypothetical Example: On the (fictional) tv series Troperians Among Us, Troperians started to invade Earth, but humans found out that water was a major weakness for the alien race. So for many years (read: episodes/seasons) they've used water guns and water balloons as weapons against the Troperians. One night, evil Troperian warlord, Bob steps off a spaceship and onto dry soil for the first time. The rebels react by dousing Bob with water, but he does not respond with pain because the water has no ill effect on him. The human rebels promptly say "Oh Crap."
      • For many seasons it was established on Supernatural that the special knives they had could kill any demon. Excepting any Satanic Kings Of Hell. However, a lady demon in season 8 just laughs off the knife wounds. (It was speculated that it was because the demon was really old, but it was never really addressed.)
      • Bella's lack of a bloodlust after her Vampification in Breaking Dawn might also count here.
  • April 19, 2013
    thewriter
    The Angel example about him in Pylea is actually a subversion. While he can stand out in the sun in Pylea due to it not being his home dimension nor Earth's sun, the effects of him being in the foreign sunlight actually makes him even more of a monster. The vampire demon inside of him transformed worse than usual and went on a rampage due to no actual weakness to hold it back.
  • April 19, 2013
    Irrisia
    Acquired Poison Immunity does seem to cover the very similar trope of "making yourself immune to a deadly substance by taking it in small doses on a regular basis."

    The Terry Pratchett book Carpe Jugulum has a family of vampires whose father has trained them all to be immune to sunlight and to not react to holy symbols or garlic, as one is just a collection of lines and curves and the other is merely a member of the Allium family. This bites back hard at the end of the book, though, when the family can't stop seeing holy symbols everywhere. After all, they're just straight lines and curves...
  • April 19, 2013
    CosmeF
    I also believed they could be two tropes but there are good reasons to let it as one. There are currently 26 examples, 7 of them are examples of exceptions to the rule: they don't have the weakness since the beggining. Almost the rest of them (except for one or two that I'm thinking they aren't examples). However, most of them try to explain the issue as the character being too powerful, implying that they may have had the weak point but lost it before the beggining of the story, or that they are strange by nature, implying that there's a mysterious factor that made them lose the weak point, even if it's something unknown for the heroes or the audience. What I'm trying to say is that examples of Type 2 tend to really be just like examples of Type 1, there's a cause for they losing the weak point but it's never shown or explained. The most common explanation seems to be that the character in question is too Badass. The only example that doesn't even have an implied explanation seems to be one of the examples that you added, Bella.

  • April 19, 2013
    CosmeF
    ^^ The Acquired Poison Immunity trope was already mentioned, but honestly I don't know how should I include it on the description.
  • April 19, 2013
    thewriter
    I was getting at that every vampire in twilight struggles with bloodlust as a side effect of vampirism except for Bella. Unlike the cullens who actively go out of their way to be "vegetarian vampires" who feed only off of animals and don't try harm/eat humans, Bella just does not have a problem with being tempted to kill despite the act being a major vampire trait in the series.
  • April 19, 2013
    Irrisia
    "For cases where the character has deliberately immunised themselves over time, see Acquired Poison Immunity." maybe?
  • April 19, 2013
    CosmeF
    ^^Yeah I got you about the Bella thing, my point is that hers is the only case where there's not even an implied reason for the absence of the bloodlust, while other unexplained cases let it implicit that the character is either too badass to care about weak points or has something weird in its nature.
  • April 19, 2013
    Koveras
    To avoid the Trope Namer Syndrome (granted, Kryptonite is almost an exception to that) and unnecessary vampiric connotations, how about Standard Weaksauce Immunity?
  • April 20, 2013
    CosmeF
    It still wouldn't make sense for people that doesn't know about Weaksauce Weakness. I thought it would be good to have related names but then I read Everythings Worse With Snowclones, that's why I doubted that much about changing the name to Acquired/Applied/Standar Weaksause Immunity, it doesn't make a lot of sense by itself. Other than that, most of the Weaksauce names are pretty good.

    Vampires have proven to be confusing, most of the examples of this trope are vampires, but I'm not sure if people add that many vampire examples because of the title or if they're really the most common examples.

    Finally, I'd like to know if more people thinks this trope should be splited. Maybe we can just distinguish between the two types on the same page, like in ^x9 (thewriter's post)?
  • April 20, 2013
    MiinU
    This does seem like two separate, yet tangentially related tropes, so a split might curb confusion and clutter.

    • Have one be about instances where the character actively works toward achieveing immunity through means such as repeat exposure, and the like.

    • And make a separate YKTTW for examples where what would be a commonly expected weakness either has minimal, or no effect. These may (or may not) have an in-universe explanation.
  • April 21, 2013
    Koveras
    "Removed Achilles Heel" makes me think of amputees. =)
  • April 21, 2013
    rcmerod52
    This seems to be ready for launch. Someone else should do it though, I already did a couple.
  • April 21, 2013
    surgoshan
    • The Doctor Mc Ninja villain Frans Reyner had a weak spot in his left buttcheek that McNinja's father used to defeat him. Later, McNinja noticed he'd moved it to he left eyebrow, but didn't need to use it at that point. However, since Franz survived McNinja throwing him off a cliff to his Nobody Could Survive That death, he moved his weak spot to his right leg just before having it amputated and replaced with a robotic rocket leg.
  • April 26, 2013
    maxwellsilver
    • The Mighty Thor used to have a debilitating weakness: if he let go of Mjolnir for more than a minute, he turns into doctor Don Blake, with a crippled leg and a limp (and presumably a dry wit and acid tongue), and Mjolnir turns into a flimsy walking stick. Essentially, House. Fortunately, this was removed, thus making Thor practically invincible.
  • April 27, 2013
    maxwellsilver
  • April 27, 2013
    CosmeF
    Sorry, I've been busy, again... well it seems like I have to launch it. It's ok to launch it without image or quote or anything? Apparently it is, but it just feels bad...
  • April 27, 2013
    MissKitten
    Yeah. Looks good, go ahead and launch it.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=ewy64i0pcjg158hzlisld7lq&trope=RemovedAchillesHeel