Created By: MaklodesNovember 19, 2012 Last Edited By: KoverasSeptember 30, 2013
Troped

Hard Coded Hostility

A faction which cannot be negotiated with and is perpetually at war with every other faction

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Sometimes, in Strategy Game, Role Playing Game, or other circumstances, complex deals are possible: you can negotiate treaties, break them, form secret pacts against common enemies, join factions, recruit unaffiliated people into your personal faction or party, etc.

On the other hand, sometimes Violence Is The Only Option. Such is the case for a faction with Hard-Coded Hostility. The distinguishing feature of this group is that it will never be at peace with you or anyone else. The only reaction when encountering its forces is to kill them or avoid them.

A deeply unsympathetic, even evil faction — perhaps even one that starts off the game trying to kill the player — is not necessarily an example of Hard-Coded Hostility. If The Horde is ravaging the local area looting local cities, enslaving people, and tries to kill you on sight, but you can prove your worthiness to join them if you kill a dozen villagers and present their heads to their khan, then the horde does not demonstrate this trope. By definition, someone with Hard-Coded Hostility cannot be joined or negotiated with within the parameters of the game.

The term is best reserved for games in which is is not the norm. For instance, in a First Person Shooter in which the bulk of the game consists of killing demonic enemies, the demons are best not thought of as having Hard-Coded Hostility; rather, the term is best applied in circumstances which otherwise feature a diverse set of factions which can be opposed or cooperated with depending on the player's actions.

This is a game specific trope because, while AI-controlled game factions have no "choice" but to follow their programming (and in this case, the programming makes them incapable of diplomacy), actual sentient beings are more flexible — they can make a choice to negotiate or listen to diplomacy, and whether or not they do only 0.0005% of the time or even 0% of the time, there's still the choice and thus still a hope that they might — because the one trying to negotiate doesn't know with 100% certainty whether or not the other side will listen.

Related to Absolute Xenophobe. Compare Always Chaotic Evil and The Usual Adversaries. This is about games which allow the player to build alliances with most factions except one in particular.


Examples

Four X
  • Pirates in Galactic Civilizations are heavily armed ships that attack ships, particularly freighters, of all civilizations. Sometimes they randomly appear, sometimes a fleet of them shows up after a breakout from a galactic prison, and when an evil or neutral civilization is defeated many of their remaining ships become pirates.
    • GalCiv2 also introduces the Dread Lords, Abusive Precursors who get let out of their can in the campaign or a random event in sandbox games, and then proceed to attempt to wipe out all other life in the galaxy. And unlike pirates they invade planets as well.
  • Barbarians in the Civilization series: no civilization can have diplomatic relations with them, and they are hostile to every civilization.
  • In Sid Meiers Alpha Centauri, Mindworms. You can train your own or capture individual units, but wild Mindworms will always spawn as hostile to absolutely everyone.
  • Persistent, mobile, Unknown menaces and pirates in Sword Of The Stars. Menaces ranging from asteroids to Von Neuman probes to system killers show up randomly or semi-randomly to attack colonies.
  • Master Of Orion series:
    • In Master of Orion II, the Silicoid are a borderline case. They have the Repulsive flaw, which limits their diplomacy option to war, peace and surrender, and the Agressive and Expansionist traits. In practice, this meant they wouldn't ally with anyone, declare war frequently, and nothing but the most crushing military steamrolling of their fleets/worlds would get them to sue for peace or surrender. And since they had no diplomatic options like offering money, worlds, technology or tithes, (nor demanding them) once war is declared things tend to stay that way.
    • Master of Orion III has both the Antarans occupying the Orion system, and the Harvesters. Neither can be effectively negotiated with. The Harvesters (who use other alien species as food) will declare war on any neighbor (even other Harvester factions) fairly quickly, will refuse any offer for peace, and never make alliances. The Antarans generally stay in the Orion system and never expand or settle outside of it, but occasionally will send a huge fleet to attack a planet or system outside the Orion system, for no stated or apparent reason, then withdraw the fleet back (unless the attackee or other power destroys it). They will not engage in or respond to any diplomacy.
  • In the PC game Imperium Galactica II, the Kra'hen faction (Absolute Xenophobe Blood Knight aliens from another galaxy) are always hostile and won't receive diplomats or traders, and if you play as them, you can't use the diplomacy, trade, or espionage options.
  • The Cravers in Endless Space have a trait that makes them unable to make peace with other factions. The best they can be is at cold war. Any custom faction can be given the same trait.

Hack And Slash
  • The Yellow Turbans in Dynasty Warriors. They're never a playable faction since they're pretty much there to be the tutorial enemy.

Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game
  • You can work for the human pirate faction in EVE Online if you're willing to brave the lawless space they make their bases in. Good luck trying to negotiate with the Rogue Drones or Sleepers, however.
  • The Scourge, and the faction responsible for them, the Burning Legion, in World Of Warcraft.

Real Time Strategy
  • In the Empire Earth series, the diplomacy settings are locked in single-player missions so you can't try to ally with your enemies.
  • By necessity, the creeps in Warcraft III (since they're there to provide experience and items, they're even called the Neutral hostile faction). However, in the campaign they're often set to being allied with your enemies (to prevent them from being killed).

Simulation Game
  • In Dwarf Fortress, any civilization with the [BABYSNATCHER] tag is automatically and forever hostile to any civilization that lacks the tag. Only goblins have it by default, but you can mod in as many hostile races as you like.
  • In the Privateer game of the Wing Commander series, the Retros. While the pirates and Kilrathi start off being enemies of the player, only the Retros are truly irreconcilable regardless of the player's actions.
  • The Grox in Spore act like this to everyone. It is possible to alley with them, though. Doing so would cause the other races to hate you.
  • X-Universe: Played straight with the Xenon and Kha'ak. The Xenon are artificially intelligent terraforming drones that went haywire centuries ago due to a badly coded software patch and now seek to "terraform" biological life out of existence, while the Kha'ak are so thoroughly alien that the Community of Planets races are simply unable to communicate with them. Subverted with the Pirates and Yaki, whom it's possible for the player to turn friendly (although not completely in the Pirates' case because, well, they're pirates).
  • The Shivans from Descent: Free Space and its sequel.
  • In Freelancer, any faction in the game, even the ultra-xenophobic Xeno terrorists, can be made to like you if you pay them a big enough bribe, with one exception: The Nomads. Justified in that they're the only non-human faction - they're aliens who were artificially created to act as caretakers of Sirius, and their duties include wiping out the human invaders.

Turn Based Strategy
  • Rebels in the Total War series. The rebel faction, while perpetually at war with everyone, is also used in the early games not just to represent rebels and criminals, but also minor independent faction (such as, in Medieval II, the Florentine Republic, Valencia under El Cid, Kievan Rus, the Abbasid remnant state in Baghdad, etc). This leads to "real" factions, being eternally at war with rebels and incapable of negotiating with them, conquering most such minor "rebel" factions early in the game without qualms.

Western RPG
  • The Elder Scrolls:
    • Bandits are always hostile to everyone.
    • The Sixth House and the Camonna Tong in Morrowind. The latter is disputable, since you can (kinda) work for them during the Fighters Guild questline, but the former is indisputable and it's glaringly obvious that despite Dagoth Ur's constant invitations to join his cause, there's no real way to do it.
  • The Talon Company in Fallout 3, a group of evil mercenaries that attack on sight. They're even hostile to an evil low karma character.
  • Some gangs such as the Jackels, Fiends, Vipers and other wasteland raider groups in Fallout New Vegas are not affected by reputation and will attack you on sight no matter what. Other "criminal" groups, such as the Powder Gangers and Great Khans, are not permanently hostile factions (siding with them is often unsavory, but it is possible).
  • Can be either played straight or averted in Neverwinter Nights 1 and 2, due to the advanced faction building system available to module builders. A faction can be made hostile, indifferent or friendly toward any and all other factions, including the "player" faction, independently as required.
  • Mount And Blade has major factions which can be joined by the player and a faction of several kinds of bandits and deserters, who are always hostile to the player and the major factions.
  • Of the four factions in Vampire The Masquerade Bloodlines, the Camarilla, the Anarchs, the Kuei-Jin and the Sabbat, only the latter cannot be negotiated with, and one of the endgame missions requires the player character to eradicate them entirely.

Wide Open Sandbox
  • In the Escape Velocity series factions flagged as "xenophobic" will be hostile to anyone not of a faction marked as an ally. This is most often used for creating Space Pirates; so are the aliens in the first game.
  • Mercenaries: Playground of Destruction: There are five factions in the game: the Allied Nations, South Korea, the Russian Mafia, China and North Korea. The attitude of the first four depends on how you treat them: North Korea is always hostile to you and all of the other factions.
  • The pirates in Uncharted Waters and Uncharted Waters New Horizons. There are three other factions in the first game (Portugal, Spain, and Turkey) and six in the second (same plus England, Netherlands, and Italy) but you can ally with or even defect to them (New Horizons only). Pirates, on the other hand, are always hostile.
  • In Grand Theft Auto II, there are seven gangs you can gain respect from, and losing respect from one of them will cause that gang to become hostile. However, there's an extra gang in the third level that only appears on the small Mad Island, and it's always at negative respect, so they will always attack you on sight.


Non videogame examples:

Tabletop Games
  • Warhammer 40000:
    • The tyranids are ravenous insect-like aliens whose only purpose is to break everything into biomass and devouring it. As such, nobody really wants them around, so much so that in the new edition's ally rules, which measure each faction's willingness to cooperate with each other, the Tyranids have absolutely no allies.
    • Pre-5th edition retcon, the necrons (undead robots) existed only to scour the galaxy of every single living thing down to the last bacterium. Nowadays they can be negotiated with.
  • In GURPS War Against The Chtorr, as in the novels it's based on, there is no way to communicate or negotiate with the alien ecosystem and giant man-eating worms invading and un-terraforming Earth. It's eather kill, or be eaten.
  • The Ssu and Hluss in Tekumel games are an example, though they're closer than the Sabbat: there is no way to communicate with them, ever, and it is impossible for them to coexist peacefully on the planet with the species who invaded and terraformed it into something hostile to their kind.

Community Feedback Replies: 95
  • November 19, 2012
    StarSword
    Compare Always Chaotic Evil.

    Simulation Games
  • November 19, 2012
    zarpaulus
  • November 19, 2012
    KarjamP
    The Grox in Spore act like this to everyone. It is possible to alley with them, though. Doing so would cause the other races to hate you.
  • November 19, 2012
    KTera
    • In Dwarf Fortress, any civilization with the [BABYSNATCHER] tag is automatically and forever hostile to any civilization that lacks the tag. Only goblins have it by default, but you can mod in as many hostile races as you like.
  • November 19, 2012
    Ghilz
    Bandits in most The Elder Scrolls games.
  • November 19, 2012
    mythbuster
  • November 19, 2012
    StarSword
    Wide Open Sandbox
    • Any faction flagged as "xenophobic" in Escape Velocity will attack ships of any faction that are not specifically marked as allies. Space Pirates are usually marked xenophobic; so are the aliens in the first game.
  • November 19, 2012
    DRCEQ
    "A faction which cannot be never be negotiated with, which is perpetually at war with every other faction"

    That Laconic needs to be mended up. The Double Negative in "Cannot Be Never" implies that they CAN be negotiated with.
  • November 19, 2012
    Bisected8
    @mythbuster: I doubt there are any Real Life factions that truly couldn't be negociated with. A few might have been portrayed that way in propoganda though.
  • November 19, 2012
    StarSword
    ^Which is why this needs to be marked as such. There's no such thing as Always Chaotic Evil in real life.
  • November 19, 2012
    zarpaulus
    @Ghilz: I don't know, early in Skyrim I encountered a bandit who was willing to let me pass in exchange for a "toll" (price negotiable), of course after paying I shanked her anyways.
  • November 19, 2012
    aurora369
    The Sixth House and the Camonna Tong in Morrowind. The latter is disputable, since you can (kinda) work for them during the Fighters Guild questline, but the former is indisputable and it's glaringly obvious that despite Dagoth Ur's constant invitations to join his cause, there's no real way to do it.
  • November 19, 2012
    WeAreAllKosh
    Master Of Orion III has both the Antarans occupying the Orion system, and the Harvesters. Neither can be effectively negotiated with. The Harvesters (who use other alien species as food) will declare war on any neighbor (even other Harvester factions) fairly quickly, will refuse any offer for peace, and never make alliances. The Antarans generally stay in the Orion system and never expand or settle outside of it, but occasionally will send a huge fleet to attack a planet or system outside the Orion system, for no stated or apparent reason, then withdraw the fleet back (unless the attackee or other power destroys it). They will not engage in or respond to any diplomacy.
  • November 20, 2012
    Chabal2
    • In Discworld, the D'regs are pretty much this, warring all the time against every other tribe in the desert. On seeing the D'regs not charging, one sergeant equates it to water running uphill.
    • By necessity, the creeps in Warcraft III (since they're there to provide experience and items, they're even called the Neutral hostile faction). However, in the campaign they're often set to being allied with your enemies (to prevent them from being killed).
    • Tyranids in Warhammer 40 K.
      • Pre-6th edition Retcon, the Necrons (undead robots) existed only to scour the galaxy of every single living thing down to the last bacterium. Nowadays they can be negotiated with.
  • November 20, 2012
    Koveras
    • The pirates in Uncharted Waters and Uncharted Waters: New Horizons. There are three other factions in the first game (Portugal, Spain, and Turkey) and six in the second (same plus England, Netherlands, and Italy) but you can ally with or even defect to them (New Horizons only). Pirates, on the other hand, are always hostile.
  • November 20, 2012
    Maklodes
    I'm little behind on getting peoples examples into this YKTTW. Anyway, I thought I'd change the name from "outlaw faction" to "permanently hostile faction," which is somewhat clunkier, but perhaps more accurate descriptively. Thoughts?
  • November 20, 2012
    Astaroth
    • In Freelancer, any faction in the game, even the ultra-xenophobic Xeno terrorists, can be made to like you if you pay them a big enough bribe, with one exception - The Nomads. Justified in that they're the only non-human faction - they're aliens who were artificially created to act as caretakers of Sirius, and their duties include wiping out the human invaders.
  • November 20, 2012
    StarSword
    ^^New title is pretty good. Follows what I like to call the "three C's" of trope titles: clear, concise, moderately clever.
  • November 20, 2012
    GKaiser
    • The Scourge, and the faction responsible for them, the Burning Legion, in World Of Warcraft
  • November 21, 2012
    Arivne
    Video Games
    • Mercenaries: Playground of Destruction. There are five factions in the game: the Allied Nations, South Korea, the Russian Mafia, China and North Korea. The attitude of the first four depends on how you treat them: North Korea is always hostile to you and all of the other factions.
  • November 21, 2012
    willthiswork
    In Fallout New Vegas you can make good with some gangs like The Great Kahns and the Powder Gangers, but the Jackels, Fiends, and other wastland raider groups are not affected by reputation and will attack you on sight no matter what.
  • November 21, 2012
    jatay3
    Germs are an acceptable Real Life Example. But I suppose that would open the door.

  • November 21, 2012
    jatay3
  • November 21, 2012
    Nomic
    The Cravers in Endless Space have a trait that makes them unable to make peace with other factions. The best they can be is at cold war. Any custom faction can be given the same trait.
  • November 21, 2012
    TrollBrutal
    Related to Absolute Xenophobe
  • November 21, 2012
    shimaspawn
    ^^^ Zero Context Example and not allowed on the wiki.
  • November 22, 2012
    Arutema
    • You can work for the human pirate faction in Eve Online if you're willing to brave the lawless space they make their bases in. Good luck trying to negotiate with the Rogue Drones or Sleepers however.
  • November 22, 2012
    Arivne
    Example deleted since this is written as a Video Game trope.

    It might be a good idea to clearly state in the description that this is limited to Video Games.
  • November 22, 2012
    TheHandle
    What's the difference between that, Always Chaotic Evil, and The Usual Adversaries?
  • November 22, 2012
    Koveras
    ^ This is about games which allow the player to build alliances with most factions except one in particular.
  • November 22, 2012
    justanid
    ^^ What about a more generic Locked Alliance or Static Faction?
    • Civilization III: in one scenario if you play Rome or Byzantium you can't ditch the [censored] idiot AI, but you risk the wrath of both if you play against them.
    • Infamous: an unusual example: citizens respond to your karma meter, the only thing that changes it are binary plot choices, draining, or healing. So a "good" Cole can "accidentally" kill hoards of bystanders without consequence, and an "evil" Cole can also kill hoards of bystanders with-Ow! They throw rocks!?
    • Thief Deadly Shadows: the Keepers are for or against Garrett based on the plot and affected by nothing else. The City Watch are always against Garrett.
    • World War I started because Z was allied with Y who was allied with X, etc.
  • November 23, 2012
    SeptimusHeap
    Why is this video game specific?
  • November 23, 2012
    zarpaulus
    ^ Because in every other medium unless they're animals or mindless there is the potential for negotiation.
  • November 23, 2012
    SeptimusHeap
    That is a generalization, though. Proof? We have enough problems with not-really-medium-specific tropes alresdy without another adding to the gamut.
  • November 23, 2012
    Treblain
    ^ By the same token, adding non-game examples to tropes describing a game-specific idea gets you two separate definitions being used.

    This is best handled as a game mechanic. Works that treat it as such are examples; works that don't are not examples. If there were a non-game example that referenced the game mechanic concept (like a story set within the world of a strategy game or otherwise followed game-like rules), then it would be an example. If there were a game with an enemy that in the context of the game's story refused to negotiate with the player faction, but there was no diplomatic element in the game's mechanics, it wouldn't be an example.
  • November 24, 2012
    SeptimusHeap
    Why is this a game-specific idea? I still don't see any evidence of that.

    And by the way, Forever Hostile Faction has a better ring to me at least.
  • November 24, 2012
    morenohijazo
    Sid Meiers Alpha Centauri: The Lord's Believers and the University of Planet always hate each other. Same with the Manifold Caretakers and Usurpers.
  • November 24, 2012
    WeAreAllKosh
    ^^ Because while AI-controlled game factions have no "choice" but to follow their programming (and in this case, the programming makes them incapable of diplomacy), actual sentient beings are more flexible--they can make a choice to negotiate or listen to diplomacy, whether or not they do only 0.0005% of the time, or even 0% of the time, there's still the choice, and thus still a hope that they might--because the one trying to negotiate doesn't know with 100% certainty whether that other will or not?
  • November 24, 2012
    CapFox
    • If you win Free-For-All Mode in Sengoku Rance with the Mouri House, instead of unifying JAPAN, they instead decide to split up the conquered country between them so that they can keep on fighting
  • November 24, 2012
    SeptimusHeap
    ^^What? Since when are beings that can't be diplomaci-ed with limited to video games? I'll ask for forum feedback.
  • November 24, 2012
    WeAreAllKosh
    (deleted my nattering... meh)
  • November 24, 2012
    zarpaulus
    @morenohijazo: I think the mindworms are a better example than any playable faction.

    Should it be specified that this applies to non-playable factions?
  • November 24, 2012
    troacctid
    I think "Most factions have an option for diplomacy, but it's disabled for this faction" is tropable as a gameplay trope. It would be a subtrope of Gameplay And Story Segregation where diplomacy is normally allowed, but is impossible for the guys who need to be killed in the story. Seems reasonable; kind of like But Thou Must (Kill Them) or No Campaign For The Wicked.

    It would need to be handled really carefully, though, because it has a very high chance of misuse if that's not super well articulated in the description and clearly indicated in the title.
  • November 24, 2012
    SeptimusHeap
    ^Yeah, this trope title is not suited for a video game specific trope.
  • November 24, 2012
    troacctid
    I'd think something more like Diplomacy Disabled or thereabouts.
  • November 24, 2012
    zarpaulus
    Most of the original examples are not full factions but just units that appear randomly or guard certain areas, more of an environmental hazard really.
  • November 24, 2012
    Treblain
    Another example: In the Four X PC game Imperium Galactica II, the Kra'hen faction (Absolute Xenophobe Blood Knight aliens from another galaxy) are always hostile and won't receive diplomats or traders, and if you play as them, you can't use the diplomacy, trade, or espionage options.
  • November 25, 2012
    DoktorvonEurotrash
  • November 25, 2012
    troacctid
    ^^^ Another strike against Permanently Hostile Faction as a name.
  • January 2, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
    Bumping this. It's written as video game specific, but with a bad name - would No Diplomacy Button or something similar ("button" is a placeholder here) work?
  • January 2, 2013
    zarpaulus
    ^ Considering this seems to be for non-playable races in strategy games where you can negotiate with playable races I'd say something like "Un Diplomatic Faction".
  • January 2, 2013
    ElCheViva
    The Shivans from Descent: Free Space and its sequel.

    The Scrin from Command And Conquer Tiberium Wars.

    The Ing from MetroidPrime 2.
  • May 24, 2013
    Larkmarn
    How about Unrecruitable Faction? As the post above me with the Ing shows, there's going to be misuse with the name.
  • May 24, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
    How about a name that points out that this is a game mechanic?
  • May 24, 2013
    Koveras
    ^ Your suggestion?
  • May 24, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
  • May 24, 2013
    Earnest
    In Master Of Orion II, the Silicoid are a borderline case. They have the Repulsive flaw, which limits their diplomacy option to war, peace and surrender, and the Agressive and Expansionist traits. In practice, this meant they wouldn't ally with anyone, declare war frequently, and nothing but the most crushing military steamrolling of their fleets/worlds would get them to sue for peace or surrender. And since they had no diplomatic options like offering money, worlds, technology or tithes, (nor demanding them) once war is declared things tend to stay that way.
  • May 24, 2013
    StarSword
    Wide Open Sandbox:
    • In the Escape Velocity series factions flagged as "xenophobic" will be hostile to anyone not of a faction marked as an ally. This is most often used for creating Space Pirates.
  • May 24, 2013
    Larkmarn
    Would the Yellow Turbans in Dynasty Warriors count? They're never a playable faction since they're pretty much there to be the tutorial enemy.
  • May 24, 2013
    Chabal2
  • May 25, 2013
    Melkior
    I think Permanently Hostile Faction describes the trope well.

    Role Playing Games:
    • Can be either played straight or averted in Neverwinter Nights 1 and 2, due to the advanced faction building system available to module builders. A faction can be made hostile, indifferent or friendly toward any and all other factions, including the "player" faction, independently as required.
  • May 25, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
    Permanently Hostile Faction doesn't sound video game specific, though. It will get lots of misuse with that name.
  • May 25, 2013
    MrRuano
    Warhammer 40000 has the Tyranids, ravenous insect-like aliens whose only purpose is to break everything into biomass and devouring it. As such, nobody really wants them around, so much so that in the new edition's ally rules, which measure each faction's willingness to cooperate with each other, the Tyranids have absolutely no allies.
  • May 25, 2013
    StarSword
    ^Will the necrons negotiate?
  • May 25, 2013
    KTera
    • Also in Sid Meiers Alpha Centauri, Mindworms. You can train your own or capture individual units, but wild Mindworms will always spawn as hostile to absolutely everyone.
  • May 25, 2013
    MrRuano
    ^^ There was one battle, although made by a certain codex author whose name is synonymous to defilement, where the Necrons decided to work with the Blood Angels to fight off the Tyranids.

    http://wh40k.lexicanum.com/wiki/Gehenna_Campaign#.UaFdJLVvP0M Here's a reference to said event.
  • May 25, 2013
    StarSword
    Ok, then that raises the question of whether ally rules pre-5E would have allowed that. (I'm familiar with some of the setting and I've read several of the novels but I've never played.)
  • May 25, 2013
    jatay3
    In Roman Law pirates were called Hostis humani generis or enemies of all mankind. This is of course a legal convenience rather then a practice as obviously pirates can stop being pirate. But it is about the closest real life example among humans.
  • May 25, 2013
    StarSword
    ^This is a gameplay mechanics trope.
  • May 26, 2013
    Koveras
    I think No Diplomacy Button works as a title.
  • May 26, 2013
    Melkior
    ^ But that doesn't convey the idea of permanent hostility. A race in a game may be perfectly peaceful so long as you don't try to interact with them at all. You may be able to stroll right past them without anything happening. You may also be able to talk to them and find they simply tell you they're not interested in contact, negotiations or trade with other races. All of that is No Diplomacy Button but not Permanently Hostile Faction.
  • May 26, 2013
    Koveras
  • May 26, 2013
    StarSword
    ^There we go.
  • May 26, 2013
    xie323
    @Larkmarn

    You can play as them sometimes.

    Anyways:

    • The Talon Company in Fallout3, a group of evil mercenaries that attack on sight. They're even hostile to an evil low karma character.
    • In Empire Earth series, the diplomacy settings are locked in single-player missions so you can't try to ally with your enemies.
  • May 26, 2013
    StarSword
    I think the page quote would go better with the Obsessive Assassin YKTTW. Also, there's a bunch of Zero Context Examples, and we should probably purge the non-mechanics examples. E.g. the Scrin are a story example, and then only in single-player; they can use the diplomacy button in multiplayer just like Nod and GDI. The Ing just serve the purpose of Monster Of The Week; there's no diplomacy mechanic in Metroid Prime at all.
  • May 26, 2013
    morenohijazo
    ^ OK, I've deleted that.
  • May 26, 2013
    Koveras
    A little nitpick: it should be "Hard-Coded" with a hyphen. Make sure to add it as a custom title when this launches.
  • May 26, 2013
    Astaroth
    Could we put a blue link to If Youre So Evil Eat This Kitten somewhere in the third paragraph, possibly in place of the bit that's currently bluelinked to Videogame Cruelty Potential?
  • May 26, 2013
    morenohijazo
    • Barbarians in the Civilization games: no civilization can have diplomatic relations with them, and they are hostile to every civilization.
    • In Grand Theft Auto II, there are seven gangs you can gain respect from, and losing respect from one of them will cause that gang to become hostile. However, there's an extra gang in the third level that only appears on the small Mad Island, and it's always at negative respect, so they will always attack you on sight.
  • May 26, 2013
    StarSword
    Did a draft cleanup and fixed an error in the 40k entry (we've determined that the negotiating-with-necrons thing started in 5th edition, not 6th).
  • May 26, 2013
    MrL1193
    Would this example count?

    In Lordsof Magic, the Death faith is unique in that its mutual relations with other faiths steadily deteriorate over time even if no contact between them is made, making it nearly impossible to maintain an alliance with them. If you're playing as another faith, with enough work, you can make or remain friends with Death...temporarily. However, it's only a matter of time before they betray you, at which point your mutual relations instantly hit rock bottom. And since your diplomatic options become increasingly limited and other faiths become less and less likely to accept deals as your relations deteriorate, once you're at war, you tend to stay at war until either you or the other faith bites the dust.
  • May 27, 2013
    Melkior
    I like Hard-Coded Hostility as the new name for the trope, although it might exclude some examples (such as mine) where it's soft-coded but not able to be changed without effectively re-coding the game.
  • May 27, 2013
    Koveras
    ^ Tropes Are Flexible, so if an example fits the general idea of the trope, but not its title, it should still be included with an explanation.
  • June 7, 2013
    Psychopompos007
    • Mount And Blade has major factions which can be joined by the player and a faction of several kinds of bandits and deserters, who are always hostile to the player and the major factions.
  • June 7, 2013
    UltramarineAlizarin
    I ran through the description and changed instances of "permanently hostile faction" to "Hard-Coded Hostility" and match the trope name. Though, changing the title from a person to a concept made some of the rewrites a little clunky. Maybe Hard Coded Hostiles to retain the alliteration and get back the "characterization" aspect? Also means we can put this trope in the Video Game Characters index.
  • June 15, 2013
    Folamh3
    • Of the four factions in Vampire The Masquerade Bloodlines, the Camarilla, the Anarchs, the Kuei-Jin and the Sabbat, only the latter cannot be negotiated with, and one of the endgame missions requires the player character to eradicate them entirely.
  • June 15, 2013
    Koveras
  • June 15, 2013
    ArcadesSabboth
    The Sabbat have free will and can choose to negotiate as individuals. Like the trope description says, just because they choose to negotiate 0% of the time doesn't mean they can't.

    I'm not even sure if the Ssu and Hluss in Tekumel games are an example, though they're closer than the Sabbat: there is no way to communicate with them, ever, and it is impossible for them to coexist peacefully on the planet with the species who invaded and terraformed it into something hostile to their kind.

    Definitely an example:

    • In GURPS War Against The Chtorr, as in the novels it's based on, there is no way to communicate or negotiate with the alien ecosystem and giant man-eating worms invading and un-terraforming Earth. It's eather kill, or be eaten.
  • June 17, 2013
    morenohijazo
    ^ I would say, they fit. It doesn't matter whether they theoretically could be able to negotiate: if they don't, they fall into this trope.
  • June 17, 2013
    Omeganian
    In Fredric Brown's short story "The Arena", an Energy Being tells the protagonist that no peace is possible between humanity and the aliens - they are too different to understand each other, so that's why it must resolve the conflict by eliminating one of the sides on the spot.
  • June 17, 2013
    ArcadesSabboth
    ^^ The description specifically says that if they have the ability to negotiate according to the game rules, then it doesn't count as this trope, even if they negotiate 0% of the time.

    "This is a game specific trope because, while AI-controlled game factions have no "choice" but to follow their programming (and in this case, the programming makes them incapable of diplomacy), actual sentient beings are more flexible -- they can make a choice to negotiate or listen to diplomacy, and whether or not they do only 0.0005% of the time or even 0% of the time, there's still the choice and thus still a hope that they might -- because the one trying to negotiate doesn't know with 100% certainty whether or not the other side will listen."

    I'm not entirely certain how well the trope can appear in non-video games at all. Though I do think the War Against the Chtorr game counts.
  • June 19, 2013
    Paradisesnake
  • June 19, 2013
    zarpaulus
    • Galactic Civilizations: Pirates are heavily armed ships that attack ships, particularly freighters, of all civilizations. Sometimes they randomly appear, sometimes a fleet of them shows up after a breakout from a galactic prison, and when an evil or neutral civilization is defeated many of their remaining ships become pirates.
      • GalCiv2 also introduces the Dread Lords, Abusive Precursors who get let out of their can in the campaign or a random event in sandbox games, and then proceed to attempt to wipe out all other life in the galaxy. And unlike pirates they invade planets as well.
    • Sword Of The Stars: Menaces ranging from asteroids to Von Neuman probes to system killers show up randomly or semi-randomly to attack colonies.
  • June 22, 2013
    MorganWick
    How many of these are or aren't neutral "non-factions" like barbarians or pirates?
  • September 30, 2013
    Koveras
    I have updated a wick for a work page that has just been split off. Also, somebody please launch this...

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable