Created By: Routerie on March 3, 2012 Last Edited By: SeptimusHeap on December 18, 2012
Troped

SpoofedWithTheirOwnWords

Mocking a work by quoting it exactly

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Main
Page Type:
Trope
We're splitting this off from Parody Failure and Narrow Parody, which are confusing pages that we partially overlap but alsoinclude several unrelated things - this, ParodyShoutOut, SpoofedTheIronicFilmSeriously, RedundantParody and SpoofingSpoofiness.

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Parodies normally exaggerate source material. Occasionally they don't - they repeat the original's exact words to show just how absurd they really sound. The quote, inserted in a parody context, often sounds as ridiculous or funny as the surrounding parody dialog.

See also "Not Making This Up" Disclaimer, for when the work explicitly states that it's not exaggerating the original. If the work mistakenly quotes the original, it's Redundant Parody.


Examples

[[folder:Anime]]
  • One of the earlier episodes of Dragon Ball Z has Raditz tearing off Piccolo's arm, followed by the mocking line "Has anyone seen my arm? You can't miss it, it's green!" This line is present verbatim in pretty much every parody, rewrite, or Abridged Series of DBZ.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Film]]
  • Airplane! is largely word-for-word quoted directly from the film Zero Hour, but with the serious deadpan delivery taking place in absurd surroundings.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live Action TV]]
  • Mystery Science Theater 3000 does this a few times.
    • For "Pod People", two of the host segments consist of re-enacting some of the film's most bizarre scenes almost verbatim.
    • For The Phantom Planet, they poke fun at Ray Makonnen's out-of-nowhere Contemplate Our Navels monologue ("You know, Captain, every year of my life, I grow more and more convinced that the wisest and best is to fix our attention on the good and the beautiful... if you just take the time to look at it.") by reciting the entire thing later, multiple times.
  • Saturday Night Live had a famous skit about Sarah Palin during the 2008 U.S. presidential race. The skit very intentionally consisted almost entirely of actual Palin lines from her interview with Katie Couric. A couple of judicious additions and Tina Fey's delivery were all it took.
  • The Daily Show does this all the time. Interviewing John Stewart, Rachel Maddow even claimed to see little difference between his method of parodying events and her own of humorously reporting on them.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Music]]
  • Weird Al usually thinks up silly imagery to put into his song parodies, but in "Perform this Way," most of the lyrics mention things Lady Gaga has actually done, like being born out of an egg on stage.
  • The rant at the beginning of The Doors song "The Soft Parade" has Morrison speaking thusly:
    When I was back there in seminary school
    There was a person there
    Who put forth the proposition
    That you can petition the Lord with prayer
    Petition the Lord with prayer
    Petition the Lord with prayer
    You cannot petition the Lord with prayer!
The line "petition the Lord with prayer" sounded like a mockery of that proposition, the way it was said. [[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Comics]]
  • In I Wanna Be the Guy, you eventually fight Dracula from the Castle Vania series. The bombastic dialogue between him and The Kid is taken directly from one of the Castlevania games, albeit spoken in a squeaky voice.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Comics]]
  • Jesus and Mo will often quote something recently said by a real life religious apologist, putting their words into the mouths of the title characters. The orginal article is generally linked to in the commentary, with the writer listed as "guest scriptwriter".
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Original]]
  • LittleKuriboh made a video (youtube link) parodying the abridger "Chicken Wings" and his abridged Dragon Ball Z episode. It's almost an an exact copy of the original video, just with the voice slightly exaggerated.
  • The Editing Room will sometimes include actual lines of dialogue or describe a scene that actually happened in the movie, usually including (actual line of dialogue) or THIS HAPPENS.
  • Zero Punctuation's review of Medal of Honor: Warfighter opens with Yahtzee stating that normally, he makes fun of a game by increasingly altering the title through the review until it gradually becomes ridiculous. In this case, he says that he can't do that, because there's nothing more silly than simply using its actual name.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Real Life]]
  • Without (ahem) getting into specific examples, politicians on the campaign trail will often repeat a soundbite or quote, often out-of-context, that was recently uttered by their opponent in the campaign. Due to there not being context, the attacking politician will often distort the meaning of the quote or the intentions of its speaker.
[[/folder]]
Community Feedback Replies: 42
  • March 3, 2012
    Lumpenprole
    Jack Chick's fundamentalist cartoon pamphlets are so over the top that detractors usually don't bother to do anything but quote his material unchanged.

  • March 3, 2012
    Routerie
    Do you have an example of the work that quotes the pamphlets?
  • March 3, 2012
    HeartOfAnAstronaut
    The Daily Show uses this aaaaaall the time.
  • March 3, 2012
    guyy
    Sam Harris's book The End Of Faith fills several entire pages with nothing but Koran quotations to demonstrate how frequently it tells readers to kill or hate infidels.
  • March 3, 2012
    DrStarky
    I would add something like:

    "When they go out of the way to tell you that this is what they actually said, see Not Making This Up Disclaimer."
  • March 3, 2012
    JonnyB
    Airplane! is largely word-for-word quoted directly from the film Zero Hour, but with the serious deadpan delivery taking place in absurd surroundings.
  • March 9, 2012
    abk0100
    Little Kuriboh made a video (youtube link) parodying the abridger "Chicken Wings" and his abridged Dragon Ball Z episode. It's almost an an exact copy of the original video, just with the voice slightly exaggerated.
  • March 21, 2012
    Blork
    Jesus And Mo will often quote something recently said by a real life religious apologist, putting their words into the mouths of the title characters. The orginal article is generally linked to in the commentary, with the writer listed as "guest scriptwriter".
  • March 28, 2012
    fulltimeD
    I think I might know of a complete inversion of this trope: quoting something in a serious context which was originally intended as mocking. A prime example being how many times authors will use the "What a piece of work is a man" monologue from Hamlet:

    "What a piece of work is a man, How noble in
    Reason, how infinite in faculties, in form and moving
    how express and admirable, In action how like an Angel!
    in apprehension how like a god, the beauty of the
    world, the paragon of animals."

    And usually they stop right there, before the following:

    "And yet to me, what is
    this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me; no,
    nor Woman neither; though by your smiling you seem
    to say so."

    Taken in context, Hamlet was mocking that humanistic view of man as "the paragon of animals." But often, writers will quote only the first part, un-ironically.
  • March 28, 2012
    Alvin
    I remember seeing a Benny Hill skit spoofing Mac Donald type singing, and later discovering he was using an actual operetta song once sung by Mac Donald, pretty much word-for-word. I'll try to find it on You Tube later.
  • March 28, 2012
    robybang
    • The Editing Room will sometimes include actual lines of dialogue or describe a scene that actually happened in the movie, usually including (actual line of dialogue) or THIS HAPPENS.
  • March 29, 2012
    donald
    can take the form of Ironic Echo
  • March 29, 2012
    Folamh3
    Not sure if this qualifies:

    • A variant in Good Night And Good Luck - at least one critic attacked the film for hiring an extremely hammy, over-the-top actor to play Sen. Joe McCarthy. In point of fact, the film exclusively used real stock footage of the senator.
  • March 29, 2012
    KingZeal
    • Castlevania: How many times have you seen this spoofed in Exact Words?
      "Die monster! You don't belong in this world!"
      "It is not by my hands that I was once again given flesh! I was brought here by humans who wish to pay me tribute!"
      "Tribute?! You steal men's souls and make them your slaves!"
      "Perhaps the same could be said of all religions!"
      "Your words are as empty as your soul! Mankind ill needs a savior such as you!"
      *glass shatters*
      "What is a man?! A miserable little pile of secrets! But enough talk! Have at you!"
  • March 29, 2012
    randomsurfer
    On of Linkara's most popular Catch Phrases, "I am a man! [punch]" comes from his mocking of Superman At Earths End where the line is said seriously.
  • March 29, 2012
    Alvin
    My earlier post about Benny Hill? I meant Nelson Eddy & Jeannette Mac Donald; according to a website that calls itself 'Benny's Place', the song was 'Lover Come Back to Me' from the operetta 'New Moon', and Benny did it twice, once with Pat Ashton (aired Feb. 22, 1973) and earlier with Janie Marden (aired Apr. 20, 1968).
  • April 10, 2012
    SingingRain
    We have Review Ironic Echo, which is of related to this trope.
  • April 11, 2012
    Andygal
    South Park did this when making fun of a certain religion
  • April 13, 2012
    ScanVisor
    • Almost any line from Metroid Other M can and has been used for this purpose, but most infamously the monologue about the "Baby's Cry" distress signal.
  • April 13, 2012
    abk0100
    Found this on Parody Failure:

    • Weird Al usually thinks up silly imagery to put into his song parodies, but in "Perform this Way," most of the lyrics mention things Lady Gaga has actually done, like being born out of an egg on stage.
  • May 11, 2012
    randomsurfer
    Two episodes of South Park spoofed Scientology and Mormonism respecitvely by accurately presenting (to the best of my knowledge) the beliefs of Scientology and the origin of Mormonism. During the Scientology episode they ran a Not Making This Up Disclaimer: "This is what Scientologists actually believe."
  • May 11, 2012
    dalek955
  • September 19, 2012
    NightNymph
    I'm not sure this fits exactly since it is more of an affectionate parody - but it may be a "played with" example:

    As a tribute to the late author Dr. Suess, in a 2001 episode of Saturday Night Live, Reverend Jesse Jackson gave a word for word serious reading from Green Eggs and Ham which he read as he would a sermon. Due to the seriousness of his tone while reading the (intentionally) silly rhymes, it was very amusing.
  • September 19, 2012
    mrincodi
    Conservapedia: Opponents just have to quote it verbatim.
  • September 19, 2012
    mrincodi
    The game Zero Wing, of course, which brought us All Your Base Are Belong To Us. This trope may be caused by Good Bad Translation, Blind Idiot Translation, or real cases of Engrish.
  • September 19, 2012
    mrincodi
    The game Zero Wing, of course, which brought us All Your Base Are Belongto Us. This trope may be caused by Good Bad Translation, Blind Idiot Translation, or real cases of Engrish in general.
  • September 19, 2012
    Tuckerscreator
    Conservapedia: Opponents just have to quote it verbatim.
  • September 19, 2012
    JakeTheYak
    Perceived as this in an episode of Never Mind The Buzzcocks, by guest panellist Samuel Preston, who walked out when host Simon Amstell read out loud from his then wife Chantelle Houghton's autobiography. To be fair, Amstell was a ruthless Deadpan Snarker, so the walk-off was arguably pre-emptive. Became a Running Gag as the remaining panellists pretended to walk off at the smallest perceived slight. The following episode, Amstell gave out lollies to the guests as a reward for staying for the entire show.
  • September 28, 2012
    johnnye
    ^ "Perceived"? The show exists to ruthlessly mock its guests, it's pretty obvious that's what Amstell was doing.
  • September 28, 2012
    Tuckerscreator
  • September 28, 2012
    Irrisia
  • September 28, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    Many of The Abridged Series have moment where they quote the show verbatim, and have a card such as "Actual Dub Dialog" to note that it's the same words from the show.
  • September 29, 2012
    NateTheGreat
    Does this example count?

    In the pilot episode of Stargate SG 1 Samantha Carter made an infamous comment:

    Carter: I'm an Air Force officer just like you are, Colonel. And just because my reproductive organs are on the inside instead of the outside, doesn't mean I can't handle whatever you can handle.

    Then at the end of the eighth season a Carter from an alternate timeline is rehearsing a rant she intends to give (Trick Dialogue) and...

    Carter: Now, just because my reproductive organs are on the inside instead of the outside doesn't ... God, that's horrible! Who would ever say that?!

  • September 29, 2012
    Chabal2
    Polar opposite of Quote Mine, where quotes are rearranged to fit an agenda.

  • September 29, 2012
    Noaqiyeum
  • December 1, 2012
    SeptimusHeap
    Taking over this YKTTW to finish the TRS thread. Can we get some more examples?
  • December 1, 2012
    WeAreAllKosh
    Music

    The rant at the beginning of The Doors song "The Soft Parade" has Morrison speaking thusly:
    When I was back there in seminary school
    There was a person there
    Who put forth the proposition
    That you can petition the Lord with prayer
    Petition the Lord with prayer
    Petition the Lord with prayer
    You cannot petition the Lord with prayer!
    The line "petition the Lord with prayer" sounded like a mockery of that proposition, the way it was said.

  • December 1, 2012
    WeAreAllKosh
    Real Life

    Without (ahem) getting into specific examples, politicians on the campaign trail will often repeat a soundbite or quote, often out-of-context, that was recently uttered by their opponent in the campaign. Due to there not being context, the attacking politician will often distort the meaning of the quote or the intentions of its speaker.

    (And we wonder why campaigns can get so hyper-scripted, with everyone having to be extremely careful with every sentence they utter lest one get used that way....)
  • December 18, 2012
    SeptimusHeap
    Added last examples. Unless objections arise, will launch soon.
  • December 18, 2012
    Larkmarn
    Under Web Original:

    • Zero Punctuation's review of Medal of Honor: Warfighter opens with Yahtzee stating that normally, he makes fun of a game by increasingly altering the title through the review until it gradually becomes ridiculous. In this case, he says that he can't do that, because there's nothing more silly than simply using its actual name.
  • December 18, 2012
    McKathlin
    A related trope is Twisting The Words, when someone takes another's exact words and uses them out of context to create a false impression. (That's what this YKTTW's current Real Life paragraph is describing.)
  • December 18, 2012
    MetaFour
    • Mystery Science Theater 3000 does this a few times.
      • For "Pod People", two of the host segments consist of re-enacting some of the film's most bizarre scenes almost verbatim.
      • For The Phantom Planet, they poke fun at Ray Makonnen's out-of-nowhere Contemplate Our Navels monologue ("You know, Captain, every year of my life, I grow more and more convinced that the wisest and best is to fix our attention on the good and the beautiful... if you just take the time to look at it.") by reciting the entire thing later, multiple times.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=c5m0elk59aibu5oi6zh9388j&trope=SpoofedWithTheirOwnWords