Created By: bulmabriefs144 on March 3, 2013 Last Edited By: AmyGdala on March 20, 2013
Nuked

Fantastic Kosher

Tweaking the kosher law in a nonstandard setting

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
"You must not cook a young goat in its mother's milk."

This is the food equivalent of Powered by a Forsaken Child. Contrary to the description, it is not necessarily limited to mixing meat and milk. Especially, it is not limited to mixing the meat of goats and their mother's milk. The dietary law above was more about the risk of doing so, creating a cannibalizing effect. And That's Terrible. There are also some animals you can't eat, such as shellfish or pork.

Great. Now imagine this applied to fiction. The creators have actually thought about the laws, and applied them to the setting. If it's a realistic setting, you might have actual kosher with a few discussions on what should also be forbidden. If it's a fantasy/science fiction setting, there might be analogous rules and regulations, such as not eating Eldritch Abominations because they're shellfish.


Examples:

Film

Community Feedback Replies: 24
  • March 3, 2013
    bulmabriefs144
    We need more media examples (enough Real Life stuff), especially ones that have Alien Lunch or Foreign Queasine for a gross violation of some sort of custom. Stuff like fermenting stuff inside other thing's stomachs (kiviak comes to mind, even though it's actually inter-species).

    I'm pretty sure haggis isn't kosher.
  • March 4, 2013
    Arivne
    I can't remember seeing this (or anything like it) in any form of fictional media, ever.
  • March 4, 2013
    LordGro
    What exactly is this about? The description is weird. Is it about certain dishes? Or about food taboos?

    And how come there is already natter in the example section when no examples were posted and nobody edited the draft other than the OP?
  • March 4, 2013
    ACarlssin
    I'm with Lord Gro. What are you talking about? You list some errata about Kosher law, then suggest expanding it to alien plants...? I'm not sure where you're going with this.

    From what I can gather from your examples, you're talking about mixing a substance with a modified version of itself... Which I don't think would be a trope.
  • March 4, 2013
    arromdee
    Also, a chicken egg is not considered to be milk by kosher law. You are allowed to eat it with milk, but that's because you are allowed to eat it with anything, not because it counts as milk.
  • March 4, 2013
    reub2000
    HFCS isn't kosher for passover, because corn isn't kosher for passover.
  • March 4, 2013
    randomsurfer
    In Clan Of The Cave Bear Creb's favorite dish is ptarmigan stuffed with its own eggs. This is brought up at least once in every subsequent book, as Ayla takes down a ptarmigan and searches for its nest to stuff it with its own eggs just like Creb liked; or it's too early in the season for the ptarmigan to have laid eggs so she uses grasses to stuff it instead but remembers Creb wistfully, etc.
  • March 5, 2013
    aurora369
    Is it a Useful Notes page for kosher law?
  • March 5, 2013
    TheHandle
    Nothing useful to add, I just wanted to say that this trope and its examples gave me headaches and could use clearer writing. Ouch.
  • March 8, 2013
    bulmabriefs144
    It's a Fantastic Kosher trope, not a Useful Notes. Not that we couldn't use a useful notes page, but it's like Planet X15 has some law "You cannot eat space crab jelly with the intestines of sea cucumbers" but some other planets do.

    I'm gonna redescript... and change the title from Boiled In Its Mothers Milk...

    Does that description make more sense?

    Clan of the Cave Bear does have that, yes. But I changed the focus to be more on the laws themselves, than the practice.
  • March 8, 2013
    lakingsif
    So, creators taking into account the Kosher Law, and using it? Fantastic Kosher would be Playing With Kosher Law, making it fantastical and probably more restrictive, is that it? It's still not very clear.
  • March 9, 2013
    BOFH
    Literature
  • March 9, 2013
    StarSword
    We've already got Fantastic Religious Weirdness covering this, including an example from Babylon Five where Ivanova's childhood rabbi decides that alien food is kosher since the Torah doesn't mention it.
  • March 9, 2013
    bulmabriefs144
    Hmmm... Motion to discard?
  • March 9, 2013
    StarSword
    Actually, I take that back. FRW refers mainly to how Earth religions are affected by fantastic circumstances (Is alien food kosher? Do you still have to face Mecca and perform the hajj if you're on another planet and Interstellar Travel isn't Casual? Is there a patron saint of spacefarers?). This seems like Fictional Religious Dietary Requirements.
  • March 10, 2013
    Stratadrake
    Anyone up for just calling this Fantasy Kosher? I'm a little tired of seeing "fantastic" used for fantasy ... I know that's what the word can mean, I just don't like seeing it used all the time.

    Page quote is misleading, because it's taken from actual Kosher law and doesn't help convey how it might apply to a fantasy setting. Get a new one or take it out.
  • March 10, 2013
    dvorak
    Web Original
  • March 10, 2013
    SharleeD
    If this is going to be broad enough to include Speculative Fiction dietary laws that are entirely unrelated to IRL kosher restrictions, here's one:

    • In Babylon Five, the pak'ma'ra are a race of carrion-eating sentient aliens. Their culture prohibits the consumption of seafood or of non-animal foodstuffs, and although physiologically capable of eating fresh meat (or at least fresh spoo), they traditionally must wait a specific number of days after a creature's death before eating it.
  • March 10, 2013
    AmyGdala
    I removed the real life examples because, the only definition we have for this so far is "imagine this applied to fiction."
  • March 10, 2013
    zarpaulus
    ^^ Wasn't there a rabbi in one episode who wondered if a Centauri fish he and Ivanova were eating would be kosher?
  • March 10, 2013
    StarSword
    ^Mentioned that already. It falls under Fantastic Religious Weirdness.
  • March 10, 2013
    Noaqiyeum
    Eldritch Abominations are not shellfish.
  • March 11, 2013
    Stratadrake
    ...where did that come from?
  • March 20, 2013
    bulmabriefs144
    Yea... I'm gonna ditch it.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=9qvmo4ebcthueqjacxj6tezo&trope=DiscardedYKTTW