Interrogation Montage
If a bunch of people are questioned after a crime, the questionings will be blended together.
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(permanent link) added: 2012-12-10 16:16:17 sponsor: DarkLiterati (last reply: 2012-12-16 08:28:02)

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Sometimes, when the police are trying to solve a case and a large number of suspects and/or persons of interest are being interrogated (or perhaps simply interviewed), the questioner is shown getting an answer from one person, then asking a follow-up question that gets answered by an entirely different person (suggesting they are merely asking the same series of questions over and over again), which causes a seamless blending effect.

Compare Terrible Interviewees Montage.

Examples of this trope include:

Film

Live Action TV
  • Buffy the Vampire Slayer: In "Earshot," the gang splits up to investigate who might be the potential killer. The scene cuts between Willow, Xander, Oz, and Cordelia interrogating different people around the school.
  • Firefly: In "Bushwhacked," seven of the Serenity crew are arrested, resulting in a truly hilarious game of this - especially given that half of them are reacting comically, and the other half are being excessively serious.
  • In an episode of Titus the gang got thrown off a plane when they were Mistaken for Terrorist. Most of the next episode was an Interrogation Montage of the Nakama, all speaking to a Fourth Wall Federal Marshall.
  • Used in an episode of NCIS in which several members of an insurgent-fighting marine unit use suspiciously identical phrases to recount the events of the same skirmish.
  • In the Doctor Who new series episode "The Unicorn and the Wasp," the Doctor asks a number of dinner guests about the death of Professor Peach, in a manner much like the novels of Agatha Christie (who is a major supporting character in this episode.)
  • In the Castle episode "Deep In Death", Beckett, Ryan, and Esposito simultaneously interrogate three members of a drug gang about a murder.
  • Occurs in the Dollhouse episode "A Spy In the House Of Love" when Echo is interrogating the Dollhouse employees.
  • American Horror Story: Asylum inverts this in "The Coat Hanger." A small number of officials, plus the Monsignor and Dr. Arden, question Leigh about why Sister Jude would try to kill him. The truth is that she did it in self-defense, and it's all part of an ongoing ploy to keep Jude out of power in the asylum.

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