Inhuman Emotion
Characters with emotions or feelings that are beyond/different from human.


(permanent link) added: 2011-06-05 13:02:38 sponsor: Ekuran (last reply: 2011-07-12 16:40:43)

Add Tag:
redirects: Beyond Your Emotions, Beyond Your Human Emotions.

A character with emotions or feelings that are beyond human (well, most humans), or, at the very least, different from humans . Their pain and pleasure can be magnified to points we would find unbearable, they might have an extreme sense of empathy, or they might even have emotions that don't even exist for us. Or all of the above, and more.

It's often found in a Superior Species, because what better way is there to denote superiority than simply being able to experience more than you. Likewise, an Eldritch Abomination almost always has this aspect as well, usually to shape part of their Blue and Orange Morality.

Characters with Inhuman Emotions are prone to having Super Senses as well.


Examples

Comics
  • Kind of the point of Supergod.
  • In the final issue of All-Star Superman, it turns out that Superman's empathy and altruism are also superhuman due to his enhanced senses. The temporarily-empowered human Lex Luthor finds this out personally and seemingly reforms as a result.

Literature
  • The cherubim Proginoskes in A Wind in the Door by Madeleine L'Engle. (Yes, 'cheribum' should be plural).
  • In Foreigner, the social structure of the atevi is determined by the emotion "manchi", which is not exactly understood by humans.
  • All over the place in Clifford Simak's books with his numerous super advanced aliens that the human protagonist befriends.

Live-Action TV
  • A mild example in Star Trek, as Sarek (a Vulcan) says that "emotions run deeply within our race, perhaps more deeply than in humans."

Tabletop Games
  • The Eldar in Warhammer 40,000 are forced to be The Stoic as a race, because they are so incredibly emotional, whenever they allow themselves an outburst their evil god rips their souls from them and devours them.
    • Space Marines also feel emotions more strongly than normal humans. (It's mentioned that the fan-created Angry Marines feel rage to an extent that boggles even other Space Marines.)

Video Games
  • In the flash game How to Raise a Dragon by Gregory Weir, the player plays a dragon. During the 'adolescence' phase, the wizard who captured the dragon as a hatchling is lying sick in bed, leaving the dragon free to choose a breath power and escape. However, if the dragon chooses the healing power, it can cure the wizard.
    Forgiveness
    Occasionally, a captive dragon will forgive its captor and perform an act of kindness in a time of need.
    The dragon is in every way a superior beast to the human: superior in mind, superior in body, superior in heart. When a dragon shows anger, it burns brighter than any human rage, but draconic forgiveness shines even brighter. Only the most callous of captors could resist releasing such a noble beast.

Web Comics
  • Cultural example - the trolls in Homestuck have a different perception of romance to humans, dividing it into four different kinds, with two of them sexual and two of them platonic; and consider true hate as erotic and stable an emotion as they consider true love. For the most part, the feelings themselves aren't that alien - what's alien is that trolls embark upon, say, negotiating between two people in a destructive romance with the same ferocity that we fall in love with people. In this case, it's Blue and Orange Morality, and the trolls are simply different from humans - not better, and not worse.

Western Animation
  • Raven's anger in Teen Titans. When she loses control and her demonic side takes over, she sprouts dark tentacles of black magic that can drag victims under her cloak, where they are psychologically scarred.
  • In (one of) the Futurama episodes with the what-if machine, Bender references the emotionless state of a robot: "Robots don't have emotions, and sometimes that makes me sad." In comparison to robots, at least, he may be exhibiting Inrobot Emotion.
replies: 14

TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy