Corporate Sponsored Superhero
A superhero who finances their heroism through corporate sponsorship.


(permanent link) added: 2011-09-25 20:29:55 sponsor: nitrokitty (last reply: 2011-10-03 12:44:02)

Add Tag:
Mighty Whitey toothpaste! Captain Amazing approved!
Needs More Examples

In many superhero works, the problem comes up of Where Does He Get All Those Wonderful Toys?? Superheros have to pay the bills, after all, and super heroics isn't really that lucrative. So what's a superhero to do? Well, if you weren't lucky enough to inherit a large fortune and head a major corporation, you can either find a day job, or seek out sponsorship for your heroics! While some might turn to the government, others might want to head to the private sector for financing.

Enter the Corporate-Sponsored Superhero! Captain Brand X is here to save the day, and tell you about all the great deals you can get on insurance to cover the damages incurred by your rescue!

Note that this only applies to heroes with explicit ties to their corporate sponsor. Characters who use funds from their corporation to secretly finance their heroism (Batman for example) do not count. Expect to see corporate logos printed on tights, advertising appearances, and rampant toy marketing.

Related to Law Enforcement, Inc. and Heroes R Us.

Examples:

Anime & Manga:
  • This is the premise of Tiger & Bunny. All superheroes are sponsored by corporations, who seem to serve more of an entertainment and advertising function than actual heroics. Some of the characters, like the titular characters, try to be genuinely heroic, however.
  • Special Duty Combat Unit Shinesman features a corporate sentai team, complete with business-themed weapons like business card launchers and tie clip bombs.

Comic Books:
  • Watchmen: One of the side notes in the comic mentions a corporate sponsored hero named Dollar Bill, who ends up getting shot during a heist.
  • Booster Gold has been this at different stages in his career.
  • In DC's Seven Soldiers, The Guardian was sponsored by a newspaper.
  • A character named "Captain Copyright" was created by Canada's Access Copyright agency to "educate" children about copyright law. The campaign was wildly denounced as corporate propaganda, and was cancelled soon after.
  • Iron Man when Tony Stark isn't filling the role. Jim Rhodes wore the armor for a while under the employ of Stark and a few of his other employees have worn variations of the armor briefly. It should also be noted that part of Iron Man's Secret Identity was that he was sponsored by Stark Enterprises as Tony's bodyguard.
    • Speaking of which, The Avengers, in many incarnations, were sponsored by Tony Stark himself.
  • The WildCATS from Wildstorm were sponsored by different companies and entrepreneurs in the past.

Film:
  • Captain Amazing from Mystery Men (see page image) wears a costume emblazoned with sponsor's logos.
  • Used partially on Hancock. Ray was a marketing executive, and in one of Hancock's visits to his house saw a logo Ray made as part of a charity campaign he was doing (with little success). At the end of the movie he makes a replica of it ON THE MOON, so everybody could see it.

Live-Action TV
  • Commander Cash from the Robocop TV show.

Web Original:

Western Animation:

replies: 21

TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy