Created By: Omeganian on July 18, 2012 Last Edited By: DAN004 on December 15, 2014

Cannot Handle Untamed Nature

When someone can\'t stand even normal nature environment.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
A character, normally uptight and coming from a cleaner and "tamer" civilization (modern, secluded and rich optional), is forced to enter a more "natural" environment, whether just passing by, a temporary visit or even permanent habitation. Said environment is relatively okay (unlike a Death World), it's just that the character is unable to adapt to it.

Expect lots of whining over the heat, the rain, the annoying bugs etc. Also expect them to bring Lots of Luggage containing things from their place that they're counting upon to survive.

See also The Outside World. Subtrope of Fish out of Water. Compare and contrast Nature Is Not Nice where the nature is itself depicted as uncaring; here, the nature is in fact habitable by everyone but this person. Compare City Mouse, which is a less extreme version of this trope.


Examples

Film - Animation
  • A recurring theme in Madagascar is that nature turns out to be not as cracked up as the protagonists, zoo animals, expect it to be. Some are even terrified of it.
    Melman: Nature! It's all over me!
  • Superman Unbound has it as a major plot point for the villain.

Literature
  • A recurring theme in Isaac Asimov's works.
    • In The Caves of Steel the eponymous caves are Earth cities, which have all been domed over. People feel agoraphobic when they're outside the domes. In a later book in the series Elijah Bailey starts a movement of people going outside the domes to work gardens. Most people think that's nuts.
    • In the Foundation series all of Trantor has been domed except for the Emperor's estate. People who grew up on Trantor are unsettled (to say the least) even thinking of being outside.
    • In "Foundation and Earth", Solarians have no trouble walking outside in good weather, but the idea of a surface dwelling instead of an underground one is barbaric for them.
    • In "Deep", a race of aliens who lived underground for millions of years emigrate to Earth. They decide to live underground here as well, because they cannot imagine even the strongest of will among them can tolerate a single day in the instability of the surface (the Starfish Aliens on the surface only make it worse).
    • In "It's Such a Beautiful Day", a mother is worried about her son's mental health because he walks outside instead of using the Portal Network. She has trouble believing he likes it out there.
    • In another short story, the Tomato Surprise in the end is that Earth is not just considered horrible, it is the place where the worst of the criminals are exiled from the perfectly conditioned cities of the Moon.
  • Lt. Eve Dallas of the In Death series fits this. Not only is she city-bred but she's somewhat agoraphobic as well (and don't even get her started on cows and horses).
  • On Gor the Priest-Kings - the Physical Gods of the world - can't stand the sun and live in a giant under-mountain complex called the Nest.
  • Firesong feels this way in Mercedes Lackey's book Storm Breaking.
  • Liaden Universe. In Balance of Trade, Jethri Gobelyn (who has lived on a tiny space freighter his entire life) is not at all comfortable with planets and their weather and their dirt and their open sky (into which he thinks he might fall, being accustomed to zero gravity).
  • Discworld. Sam Vimes, being a city dweller through and through, prefers his nature in edible form and considers the countryside to be "too squishy".
  • John (The Savage)'s mother in Brave New World. She gets stranded on a primitive reservation for 18 years after growing up in the test-tube culture.
  • In the Paradox web serial Earthrise Reese, who grew up in a habitat dome on Mars, doesn't exactly feel comfortable on earth and the Pelted worlds because of the unfiltered air and weather.

Live-Action TV
  • Quark seems to have this attitude on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. During one outdoor expedition he quotes the Ferengi Rule of Acquisition "Nature decays, but latinum lasts forever."
  • In Andromeda, Beka was born and raised aboard a ship. She hates planets.

Tabletop RPG
  • Paranoia. This attitude was required for PCs whenever the Computer sent them out of Alpha Complex into the Outdoors/Outside (the After the End U.S.). One of the best examples was in the 1st Edition adventure The Yellow Clearance Black Box Blues.
  • In Transhuman Space, the creators averted the trope that living in space makes you neurotic because the vacuum could kill you by saying no, if you grow up on a space station, it's living on a planet that looks dangerous. No-one's filtering the air, there's storms and oceans and volcanoes, and how can anyone feel safe with gravity constantly tugging at them to fall down?
  • Warhammer 40,000 hiveworlders tend to think this way. One hiver, Ciaphas Cain, mentions a saying that goes "I've never seen the point of having weather". Cain himself grew up in a Hive World, and while he's gotten used to other environments since, he always states he feels more comfortable underground.

Video Games
  • In Fallout the Vault Dweller reacts this way at first, but eventually gets used to it.

Western Animation
  • In Darkwing Duck, Gozalyn hates going camping for this reason. She even puts on a gas mask to use an outhouse.
  • In My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic the weather, the seasons, even the rising of the sun and moon, are all controlled by hoof by the ponies. Except the Everfree forest, there the plants grow on their own, animals take care of themselves, and clouds move without pony intervention "it just ain't natural".

Community Feedback Replies: 57
  • July 18, 2012
    TrustBen
    Quark seems to have this attitude on Star Trek Deep Space Nine. During one outdoor expedition he quotes the Ferengi Rule of Acquisition "Nature decays, but latinum lasts forever."
  • July 18, 2012
    Lumpenprole
    Lt. Eve Dallas of the In Death series fits this. Not only is she city-bred but she's somewhat agoraphobic as well (and don't even get her started on cows and horses).
  • July 18, 2012
    elwoz
    In Fallout2 the Vault Dweller reacts this way at first, but eventually gets used to it. (IIUC not having played the game but having read a bunch of LetsPlays.)

  • July 18, 2012
    Tuckerscreator
    • A recurring theme in Madagascar is that nature turns out to be not as cracked up as the protagonists, zoo animals, expect it to be. Some are even terrified of it.
      Melman: Nature! It's all over me!
  • July 19, 2012
    Arivne
    Tabletop RPG
    • Paranoia. This attitude was required for PCs whenever the Computer sent them out of Alpha Complex into the Outdoors/Outside (the After The End U.S.). One of the best examples was in the 1st Edition adventure The Yellow Clearance Black Box Blues.
  • July 19, 2012
    ChunkyDaddy
    Real Life
    • Apparently, the process of being born can be very traumatic for newborns, especially, if the delivery room is brightly lit and noisy.
  • July 19, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    • In Darkwing Duck, Gozalyn hates going camping for this reason. She even puts on a gas mask to use an outhouse.
  • July 19, 2012
    aurora369
    ^^^^^The Vault Dweller is from Fallout 1. Fallout 2 has the Chosen One, who grew up in a wild tribe and is quite outdoorsy.
  • July 19, 2012
    randomsurfer
    "A recurring theme in Isaac Asimov's works." Specificaly...
    • In The Caves Of Steel the eponymous caves are Earth cities, which have all been domed over. People feel agoraphobic when they're outside the domes. In a later book in the series Elijah Bailey starts a movement of people going outside the domes to work gardens. Most people think that's nuts.
    • In the Foundation series all of Trantor has been domed except for the Emperor's estate. People who grew up on Trantor are unsettled (to say the least) even thinking of being outside.
  • July 20, 2012
    DaibhidC
    • In Transhuman Space, the creators averted the trope that living in space makes you neurotic because the vacuum could kill you by saying no, if you grow up on a space station, it's living on a planet that looks dangerous. No-one's filtering the air, there's storms and oceans and volcanoes, and how can anyone feel safe with gravity constantly tugging at them to fall down?
  • July 20, 2012
    randomsurfer
    On Gor the Priest-Kings - the Physical Gods of the world - can't stand the sun and live in a giant under-mountain complex called the Nest.
  • July 20, 2012
    MrInitialMan
    Firesong feels this way in Mercedes Lackey's book Storm Breaking.
  • July 20, 2012
    elwoz
    In Balance of Trade, Jethri Gobelyn (who has lived on a tiny space freighter his entire life) is not at all comfortable with planets and their weather and their dirt and their open sky (into which he thinks he might fall, being accustomed to zero gravity).
  • July 21, 2012
    nitrokitty
    • Discworld: Sam Vimes, being a city dweller through and through, prefers his nature in edible form and considers the countryside to be "too squishy".
  • July 25, 2012
    Tuckerscreator
    In one of many Author Filibusters in Life Of Pi, Pi compares letting domesticated animal out into the wild to getting a man who's lived in his home for years and throwing him out to live on the streets. Without access to resources, freedom is worthless.
  • July 26, 2012
    captainsandwich
    So this is about a place where their is a perfectly safe artificial sanctuary inside a Death World or other environment where Everything Is Trying To Kill You?
  • July 26, 2012
    zarpaulus
    ^ I don't think so, it seems more like sheltered people thinking that the natural environment is a Death World when it's actually not much worse than what we have currently.

    • In My Little Pony Friendship Is Magic the weather, the seasons, even the rising of the sun and moon, are all controlled by hoof by the ponies. Except the Everfree forest, there the plants grow on their own, animals take care of themselves, and clouds move without pony intervention "it just ain't natural".
  • July 26, 2012
    SharleeD
    Neither of these involves a space station or underground city, but they're more or less the same concept:

    • In The Science Of Discworld, the wizards observe millions of years of Roundworld's geological history, and conclude that a round planet isn't just ridiculous, but also incredibly dangerous: unlike a "proper" turtle-borne world, there's nothing to intercept incoming cometary and asteroid strikes, so nascent civilizations keep getting annihilated.

    • In the Dragaeran Empire, the Imperial Orb prevents natural disasters such as earthquakes, tsunami, or hurricanes from endangering the populace. Zerika tells Vlad that such Interregnum-era catastrophes aren't myths: as Empress, she's constantly guarding against them.
  • July 27, 2012
    nitrokitty
    • Minor example in Ciaphas Cain: Cain grew up in a Hive World, and while he's gotten used to other environments since, he always states he feels more comfortable underground.
  • July 27, 2012
    fearanger
    One example could be the whole Minecraft world. I mean, let's face it. Your stranded on some kind of island with danger all around you! Cliffs, walking dynamite called creepers and nighttime just makes it all the more horrifying with the undead, giant arachnids and tall, teleporting, glowey-eyed creatures! At least there's civilisation but some people much rather prefer hiding inside a cliff mining for resources.
  • July 27, 2012
    zarpaulus
    ^ That's a Death World

    I think the title and laconic are confusing people.
  • July 28, 2012
    dalek955
    • Warhammer 40000 hiveworlders tend to think this way. One hiver, Ciaphas Cain, mentions a saying that goes "I've never seen the point of having weather".
  • July 28, 2012
    nitrokitty
    ^^ Yeah, this is a very good trope, but Needs A Better Title or I predict Trope Decay to being confused with Death World. Maybe Sheltered City Dweller or Hates Natural Environments?
  • July 28, 2012
    zarpaulus
    ^ Doesn't seem like hate in most examples so much as fear, Afraid Of Nature Environments or Nature Phobe?
  • July 28, 2012
    LeeM
    If the TV adaptations are anything to go by, Agatha Christie 's Hercule Poirot really isn't a fan of the great outdoors, preferring to live and work in the city.
  • July 29, 2012
    TBeholder
    A Park Is Hungry Jungle?
  • July 29, 2012
    Chabal2
    I've seen an inversion, where the Country Mouse goes New York and is horrified with things the urban main character has learned to put up with, like trash everywhere in the streets and omnipresent roaches ("Oh, that? That's a cockroach, every apartment has them"). Now if only I could remember the name of the book.
  • November 5, 2012
    Stripeycat
    Subverted when Cordelia Naismith first arrives on Barrayar in the Vorkosigan books (and earlier on with her survey work). She's from a desert planet with tightly controlled city environments, so rain, free air (no utility bill inside, and no need for breath-masks outdoors), snow, timber and suchlike are pleasant and exciting surprises.
  • November 5, 2012
    Duncan
    John (The Savage)'s mother in Brave New World. She gets stranded on a primitive reservation for 18 years after growing up in the test-tube culture.
  • November 5, 2012
    dvorak
    In fallout 3, one intro to Moira's Wasteland Survival guide is "This 'Outside' place is amazing! I can't even see the ceiling when I stand in the main room!" Moira assumes you're joking.
  • November 5, 2012
    StarSword
    Film:
  • December 15, 2012
    zarpaulus
    Tabletop Games
    • Traveller: Natives of the theme park world Kamsii have trouble understanding why people from other planets don't kill off the most dangerous wildlife and chip the rest.
  • December 15, 2012
    WeAreAllKosh
    In the film Surrogates, most of the population of Earth use android avatars (which they control from inside their homes) to go about their daily business away from home, because the outside world (which is not much different than present day Earth) is deemed dangerous.
  • January 18, 2013
    elwoz
    Bump; still needs a better description and name.
  • May 14, 2013
    Chabal2
    Animorphs: At one point the group is stuck in the Amazon jungle, having survived the Yeerks, rain, army ants and piranhas. Rachel (who's nearly been eaten by the last two) exasperatedly states that if this is the jungle everyone wants to save, they can pave it over and replace it with malls as far as she's concerned. Later they get jaguar morphs, and she takes it back.
  • May 14, 2013
    Melkior
    Could possibly be called The De Natured Boy, from a Bugs Bunny cartoon.
  • May 15, 2013
    ilniaj
    How is this different from Fish Out Of Water?
  • May 15, 2013
    TonyG
    ^This would be a subtrope of that.
  • May 15, 2013
    Antigone3
    Minor example in the Elenium -- the city-raised Talen has trouble when Sparhawk and company drag him along on their quest, due to such things as forest roads not having streetlights.
  • May 15, 2013
    chicagomel
    Newspaper comics: Garfield gets this way every time Jon takes him camping. He misses his TV and warm bed and hates all the wildlife.
  • May 15, 2013
    Tallens
    • Occurs in both versions of The Parent Trap when the twins' father's fiancee accompanies them on a camping trip, something she is not suited for at all.
      Jessie: (Talking about Meredith) Oh, I would pay good money to see that woman climb a mountain.
  • May 19, 2013
    MorningStar1337
    The Laconic doesn't match the description.

    Laconic: City Mouse child doesn't think s/he would die in nature. Actual Description: Underground dwellers or people from a Small Secluded World with tons of walls are freaked out by the space and unpredictability of nature.

    I would recommend changing the laconic to match the actual description.
  • May 29, 2013
    zarpaulus
    • In the Paradox web serial Earthrise Reese, who grew up in a habitat dome on Mars, doesn't exactly feel comfortable on earth and the Pelted worlds because of the unfiltered air and weather.
  • May 31, 2013
    Boston
    On a more comedic note, this is pretty much the main theme of the Billy Crystal vehicle City Slickers.
  • September 3, 2013
    SgtFrog1
    Sadly, this even happens in real life. Not Always Right has the occasional tourist who is surprised that the Grand Canyon doesn't have electric lighting or that the ocean isn't temperature-controlled.
  • September 8, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    don't think the name quite fits. makes me think the guy can't handle the Nature(as in like in "Human Nature" ) of... something, maybe a berserk animal or person.

    i suggest Cannot Handle The Great Outdoors, which, although a little longer, is pretty memorable(no obscure words) and unambiguous.
  • January 30, 2014
    XFllo
    ^I quite agree that the name should be changed.
  • January 30, 2014
    robinjohnson
  • December 11, 2014
    Omeganian
    Any more title ideas?
  • December 11, 2014
    DAN004
    Can the description be clearer please?
  • December 11, 2014
    TomWalpertac2
    • Chakona Space: In one chapter of "Tales of the Folly", some star ship and/or Space Station raised cubs encounter Mother Nature while taking a break at Forestwalker's house.
      • They find a thunderstorm's untamed rainfall freezing and wonder where the rain's temperature controls are.
      • They find that waves on the beach "attack back".
  • December 11, 2014
    DAN004
    A deconstruction of The Outside World.
  • December 12, 2014
    Arivne
  • December 14, 2014
    aurora369
    See also Lots Of Luggage, which is what a character with this problem will often bring if forced to go outside.
  • December 14, 2014
    DAN004
    Will probably give the description some help
  • December 14, 2014
    dalek955
    • In the backstory of Deathworld, Pyrrus was originally tough but livable, but the settlers still had a lot of trouble because they were from a city planet. They weren't used to any weather at all, much less Pyrrus's ferocious where-did-that-thunderstorm-come-from climate. They had just about gotten their feet under them when they accidentally committed an act of war against the biosphere.
  • December 15, 2014
    DAN004
    Help administered
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=37lgqiugt0tfena8s6d8t89p