Created By: deuxhero on March 2, 2011 Last Edited By: whereismytea on April 10, 2012
Troped

Song of Passing

Fast-forwards the in-game clock to a more convenient time

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Trope

Needs a Better Title

Title crowner here: [1] Very few people have voted, more highly encouraged
"Did you try to play the Sun's Song? Like I told you before, with that song, you can turn day to night or night to day whenever you want."

When an In-Universe Game Clock forces the player to wait for several hours minutes in the game to progress to the next task, you're going to have angry gamers. How do you solve this issue? Add a time skip device! One use and the wait time will pass in an instant!

Frequently a spell or a song, the player needs only to punch in a sequence or click on the designated object and the clock will skip ahead (or sometimes, even backwards) in increments that are convenient to time-oriented missions. Sometimes RPGs may offer your party a "rest" or "sleep" command which allows you to fast-forward the game clock (and regenerate some HP in the process). This is often a case of Gameplay and Story Segregation, since time usually doesn't pass in any other sense.

Often accompanied by Spinning Clock Hands. Compare Warp Whistle and Sprint Shoes for passing over pointless space. Related to Time Passes Montage. A subtrope of Anti-Frustration Features.

Examples

Videogames
  • This mechanic is used frequently in The Legend of Zelda series:
  • Ōkami features brush techniques to bring day and night. The technique to call the sun is learned in the first hour of gameplay, the one to call the moon is learned only after about a dozen hours of gameplay.
  • The Breath of Fire series gives the main character a spell to do this.
  • Quest for Glory allows you to rest your Hero in intervals from 10-60 game minutes, or "until morning" (in the first game, this could easily trigger Have a Nice Death on the assumption that some monster killed you while you slept).
  • In Seiken Densetsu 3, if you stop at a Trauma Inn during the day, you have the option to be awakened in the evening or next morning, though this is rarely a concern for progressing through the Story Arc.
  • Dragon Quest features time skips in some installments:
    • Dragon Quest III had the 'lamp of darkness' that instantly turned day to night.
    • In Dragon Quest VIII, you can stay at an inn until either sunset or sunrise, in case you wish to interact with NP Cs who only appear during the day or night.
  • In Deadly Premonition, York can smoke cigarettes to make time pass more quickly. Also, any bed will allow him to sleep for three, six, nine, or twelve hours at a time.
  • Mine Craft has a bed feature which can skip the night-time portion of a day cycle.
  • In Castlevania 64, the Sun and Moon cards can be used to advance the current time so you can (among other things) have certain timed encounters and battle vampires during the day when they're weaker.
  • The act of resting in The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion allows the player to skip any amount of hours in-game.
  • Fallout 3 and Fallout: New Vegas both have a "Wait" action.
  • Fable has the Golden Carrot and the Moonfish. Eating these will move the game time forward to morning and evening respectively.
  • In WolfQuest, you have the option to make your wolf sleep until a different time of day.
  • In the educational commercial transportation/geography PC game, Crosscountry USA, there was a feature that allowed you to "wait" any number of hours, automatically passing the in-universe clock to a later time.
  • In Skyrim, pressing select will put up a feature in which you decide how many hours you want to wait. The current time should be somewhere at the bottom-left corner of the box.
  • In the Endless Ocean games, a location is provided to allow the player to move rapidly to another time of day and forwards in time with regards to things like missions.
  • Xenoblade allows the player to skip to any time in-game by an option in the menu. This greatly helps to find the NPCs that show up at specific times for the loads and loads of sidequests.
  • In Chulip, sleeping would automatically put you at 8:00 in the morning the next day until you bought an alarm clock to awaken yourself at some other time.
  • Persona 3 and Persona 4 work like this, using time periods (i.e Evening, Afternoon) that can be skipped to.

Web Comics

Web Games
  • In The Last Stand 3: Union City, when your character finds a bed in a building you can sleep for a specific number of hours to increase your Sleep stat.
Community Feedback Replies: 58
  • March 2, 2011
    dotchan
    Majoras Mask - It's a game all about time manipulation, so there's not only a song to skip ahead (Song of Double Time), but slow it down (Inverted Time) and reset time (Song of Time).
  • March 2, 2011
    Stratadrake
    In Majoras Mask, given the entire game revolves around a Groundhog Day Loop, the Song of Time also doubles as the way to save your game.

    Sometimes RP Gs may offer your party a "rest" or "sleep" command which allows you to fast-forward the game clock (and regenerate some HP in the process).

    • Quest For Glory allowed you to rest your Hero in intervals from 10-60 game minutes, or "until morning" (in the first game, this could easily trigger Have A Nice Death on the assumption that some monster killed you while you slept).

    • In Seiken Densetsu 3, if you stop at a Trauma Inn during the day, you have the option to be awakened in the evening or next morning, though this is rarely a concern for progressing through the Story Arc.

    • In Dragon Quest VIII, you can stay at an inn until either sunset or sunrise, in case you wish to interact with NP Cs who only appear during the day or night.
  • March 2, 2011
    KTera
    • In Deadly Premonition, York can smoke cigarettes to make time pass more quickly. Also, any bed will allow him to sleep for three, six, nine, or twelve hours at a time.
  • March 2, 2011
    Beetman5
    Mine Craft recently added a new bed feature, which will skip the night-time portion of a day cycle.
  • March 2, 2011
    troacctid
    The page quote doesn't really make any sense.
  • March 3, 2011
    Arivne
    • Castlevania 64. The Sun and Moon cards can be used to advance the current time so you can (among other things) have certain timed encounters and battle vampires during the day when they're weaker.
  • March 3, 2011
    HieronymusII
    Compare Warp Whistle and Bunny Hood aka Sprint Shoes, also from Zelda, for passing over pointless space.
  • March 3, 2011
    deuxhero
    @troacctid

    Have you played The Wind Waker?
  • March 3, 2011
    troacctid
    ^ Yes, I played through the whole game twice, and I'm fully aware that it includes an example of this trope, but what does three triangles have to do with the trope?
  • March 3, 2011
    Stratadrake
    I second that. They're supposed to be directional arrows (in the same vein as the Konami Code), but it's not a good quote.
  • March 3, 2011
    PaulA
    Yes. A page quote is supposed to make the trope easier to understand for people who don't know it, whether or not they're familiar with the work the quote is from. This is like the quote equivalent of Just A Face And A Caption.
  • March 4, 2011
    SilentReverence
    Putting the actual musical notes might help with that, but I think it would be better to cite something from Oo T or WW where the Musician Support Character explicitly tells Link the purpose of the song.
  • March 4, 2011
    deuxhero
    Text dump on Gamefaqs has this on the Sun's Song (Wind Waker script doesn't say anything for "Song of Passing"

    Huh? Oh, it's you. Did you try to play the Sun's Song? Like I told you before, with that song, you can turn day to night or night to day whenever you want. When you're in darkness, that song should bring the sun's light to you. You should try it.

    Forget who says it though.
  • April 28, 2011
    deuxhero
    Ready to launch?
  • April 28, 2011
    Stratadrake
    Not with that obscure title, it's not.
  • April 29, 2011
    Flioro
    The act of resting in The Elder Scrolls IV Oblivion allows the player to skip any amount of hours in-game.
  • April 29, 2011
    zandor6017
    In Final Fantasy VII[[hottip:*: and probably all of them]], a song plays whenever you spend the night in an Inn.

    In the same game you actually have to play a song on a piano to get Tifa's ultimate limit break.
  • April 29, 2011
    Stratadrake
    ^ That's not even an example, read the trope description again. This is a mechanic for fast-forwarding the In Universe Game Clock to a convenient time.
  • April 29, 2011
    randomsurfer
    Related to the Time Passes Montage.
  • April 29, 2011
    Thebes
    There's the Wait action in Elder Scrolls IV Oblivion, Fallout 3, and Fallout New Vegas.

    This desperately needs a new name.
  • April 29, 2011
    whereismytea
  • April 29, 2011
    Thebes
    A lot of these aren't spells, though.
  • April 29, 2011
    deuxhero
    I'd say a "wait/rest" command is a separate trope.
  • April 29, 2011
    Thebes
    Why? They serve the same purpose.

    If you want one specifically that switches from day to night (and vise-versa), you'll need to tweak the description.
  • April 29, 2011
    Topazan
    Non videogame example at the end of http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0155.html

    Dragon Quest III had the 'lamp of darkness' that instantly turned day to night. One wonders what the npcs think of the unusually short days.
  • April 30, 2011
    MorganWick
    I'd just finished scrolling right above your entry, thought I was done for some reason, and was just about to add the OOTS example.
  • May 1, 2011
    dalek955
    • Fable has the Golden Carrot and the Moonfish. Eating these will move the game time forward to morning and evening respectively.
  • May 1, 2011
    SpellBlade
    Controllable Time Advancement or something similar?
  • February 18, 2012
    Catbert
    Can someone that knows what this is talking about take it over?
  • February 18, 2012
    whereismytea
    I could, but I'd want some more title votes before launching.
  • February 19, 2012
    Stratadrake
    I can see what it's about too (ways to fast-forward an In Universe Game Clock to a more plot-convenient gametime), but again, it seriously Needs A Better Title.
  • February 19, 2012
    Bisected8
  • February 21, 2012
    whereismytea
    Okay, I updated the description and all the examples so far, wait/rest commands included (if they are use for time skipping, they are the same thing. If they are only for HP restoring etc. please mention it, as those really do not count).

    If we can get a title consensus it will be launch worthy.
  • February 23, 2012
    Dawnwing
    Controllable Time Advancement is good. Perhaps Time Skip Mechanic?

    • In Wolf Quest, you have the option to make your wolf sleep until a different time of day.

    • In The Legend Of Zelda Skyward Sword, you can make Link sleep in a bed either until morning or night. Your hearts regenerate as you sleep.
  • February 23, 2012
    troacctid
    I kind of like Fast Forward Mechanic.
  • February 23, 2012
    TBeholder
    As it's phrased now, there are two different things:
    • Time skip mechanics. Evening. The party sets a tent, starts a campfire... Fade Out. Fade In. Good Morning!
    • Time scale mechanics. The way of X Com, Frontier's Elite and many other "real time" games.
  • February 24, 2012
    whereismytea
    @T Beholder: I'm not sure I understand the difference with number two? (Particularly as those games aren't listed as examples yet)
  • February 24, 2012
    Dawnwing
    ^ I think they mean, with the second one, that you don't actually skip time, but you can still control time by making it speed up - for example, with The Sims, you can make time tick by at double or triple speed.
  • February 24, 2012
    whereismytea
    Ah, I see. I don't think there is a difference in purpose here as long as skipping/scaling the time is added to make certain missions/interactions possible. The Sims wouldn't count because it tends to be used to make boring things like going to the bathroom or taking a shower go by quicker, which is different. Whereas if you had a mission that could only happen at night, it doesn't really matter whether you skipped to it or scaled to it, it's still the same function, and the same trope.
  • February 24, 2012
    benjamminsam
    In the educational commercial transportation / geography PC game, Crosscountry USA, there was a feature that allowed you to "wait" any number of hours, automatically passing the in-universe clock to a later time.
  • February 25, 2012
    randomsurfer
    Often accompanying (or accompanied by) Spinning Clock Hands.
  • March 5, 2012
    whereismytea
    Since title votes are pretty scattered I made a crowner in the hopes that we might see a lead. See the link at the top!
  • March 11, 2012
    Generality
    Being able to change the rate of time is almost universal in sim games, but it's not the same as skipping. I think it's a separate trope.
  • March 11, 2012
    ultralucario64
    In Skyrim, pressing select will put up a feature in which you decide how many hours you want to wait. The current time should be somewhere at the bottom-left corner of the box.
  • March 12, 2012
    arromdee
    Using a spell to go from day to night is also often a case of Gameplay And Story Segregation, since time usually doesn't pass in any other sense.
  • March 12, 2012
    Aielyn
    I just offered a new option: Game Time Warp. It plays at least three ways - it's a "Time Warp" (as in, the song) for a game, it warps in-game time, and games often refer to ways to trigger sudden movement from A to B as a "Warp"... this is like that, but for time rather than space.

    Also, another video game example is the Endless Ocean games, where a location is provided to allow the player to move rapidly to another time of day (and forwards in time with regards to things like missions, etc).
  • March 15, 2012
    whereismytea
    All examples updated, bumping for crowner votes.

    ^Building on that I added Time Warp A Game Just For Pun, but really, more than titles we just need people to vote at all right now. Unfortunately this has been stewing so long I think it's easily ignored. :/

  • March 15, 2012
    Aries
    WHOA WHOA WHOA! The Song Of Passing is an OBSCURE TITLE?! I beg to differ. Of course I'm honestly bias because I'm a Zelda fanboy, but I'm pretty sure it is common enough to be a trope title. If not, the Suns Song definantly is.

    Zelda is the Trope Codifier I believe, and by having a title that references the game, most people can look at the title and immediately guess what the trope is. Afterall, Zelda is one of THE most popular games out there. So I vote to keep the title. That or change it to Suns Song.
  • March 15, 2012
    abk0100
    I added Song Of Passing and Suns Song to the crowner.

    I also added a some options that use the word "wait," since that's what this trope is called in Text Adventures and some RPGs before Zelda games started using it.
  • March 15, 2012
    whereismytea
    ^^ I think the objection is that for many it's not a song, and given how literally titles can be interpreted it could attract misuse.
  • March 24, 2012
    Elbruno
    • Xenoblade allows the player to skip to any time in-game by an option in the menu. This greatly helps to find the NPCs that show up at specific times for the loads and loads of sidequests.
  • March 25, 2012
    EthanE
    Magic Fast Forward?
  • April 1, 2012
    SNDL
    Voted for Time Skip Spell.
  • April 4, 2012
    dotchan
    In Chulip, sleeping would automatically put you at 8:00 in the morning the next day until you bought an alarm clock to awaken yourself at some other time.
  • April 4, 2012
    dotchan
    In Chulip, sleeping would automatically put you at 8:00 in the morning the next day until you bought an alarm clock to awaken yourself at some other time.
  • April 4, 2012
    sigh824
    Persona 3 and Persona 4 work like this. Slightly subverted in that, in place of time, time periods (i.e Evening, Afternoon) are used.
  • April 5, 2012
    Arivne
    Web Games
    • The Last Stand 3: Union City. When your character finds a bed in a building you can sleep for a specific number of hours to increase your Sleep stat.
  • April 10, 2012
    whereismytea
    A two vote edge isn't much of a lead, but this has been stewing for too long. Lauching soon under the title Fast Forward Mechanic barring serious objection.
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