Created By: Unknown TroperJune 7, 2007
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I was thinking about The Monster Mash. The X Files is perhaps the best example for television where because one paranormal thing is true, all (or at least many) paranormal things are true even when they come from different origins. So not only are there really aliens, there are ghosts, vampires, werewolves, sea monsters, superhuman mutants of all sorts, unknown species of malignant creatures, magic, and so on. (As an aside, I always wanted to see the X-Files episode where the aliens do arrive for colonization only to get wailed on by the assorted other monsters of the week who get annoyed about the people coming into their turf.) Buffy The Vampire Slayer was another example, albeit not as bad, where in addition to the magical baddies she had to deal with science fictional intelligent androids. Compare this to, for instance, the various Star Trek series, Stargate or Babylon 5 where the "magical" aspects are Sufficiently Advanced tech or the Sufficiently Advanced Alien. They aren't "real" magic.

It's common enough in comics and the superhero genre with Thor, Doctor Strange and the X-Men going up against Count Dracula, Ultron and the Skrulls.
Community Feedback Replies: 15
  • June 7, 2007
    Earnest
    Or the "Magic" is described as hyper powerful Psychic powers. But yeah, this is definetly a setting backdrop on par with the Villain Bar. I'd go with plain old Monster Mash.
  • June 7, 2007
    Unknown Troper
    Colin: This sounds like Planet Eris, but Planet Eris only focuses on webcomics. Perhaps it should be expanded?
  • June 7, 2007
    Branfish
    Monster Mash works well, with or without the "the".
  • June 7, 2007
    YYZ1
  • June 7, 2007
    KeithM
    All Myths Are True isn't exactly the same thing. In the Stargate example, for instance, although there's a dragon it's not a magic dragon. Just as in Star Trek the Q and a host of other aliens are basically gods, they aren't gods in the sense that gods are gods in fantasy novels.

    What I'm thinking of is a two-level thing. Level One is something like Planet Eris, but to use The X Files example, there's no overlap between the different genre creatures. The alien bounty hunters do not run into the vampires, the werewolves, or the superhuman (non-alien involvement) mutants; only Mulder and Scully do. It's as if there are a bunch of secret worlds lurking under the surface of the real world and the heroes are the only ones who go between them. The Illuminati really are behind everything...but so are the vampires and the aliens, and they don't have any connection with each other.

    Level Two is where the writer throws in other things yet provides no rationale for why. For instance, a heroine is off on a mission from the gods, but because there's gods and magic...well of course there are dragons and werewolves and vampires and other gods and all the other residents of Fantasyland even if there's no reason for them to be there. Suppose the team includes a vampire and a werewolf. There's nothing that requires the characters to be a vampire and a werewolf. You could replace them (and make the appropriate substitutions of powers and their roles in combat) with a wizard and a centaur and not change the story in the slightest. The existence of vampires and werewolves has no other bearing on the plot, at all, other than as a handwave to explain why there's a vampire and a werewolf on the team.
  • June 8, 2007
    Branfish
    I thought that the original poster intended Star Trek and Stargate to be counter-examples, since the supernatural is explained in sciencey terms. I took this to mean when the writers don't bother to explain everything, like in the X-Files and the X-Men.
  • June 9, 2007
    Roland
  • June 9, 2007
    Ununnilium
    That is an awesome name. I support this trope if it's named Fantasy Kitchen Sink.
  • June 9, 2007
    Roland
    Thanks. I try. :-)
  • June 10, 2007
    Branfish
    I can see a "kitchen sink" reference working, but that one seems somehow unsatisfactory. I think it's because structurally it doesn't seem to describe the circumstances as much as it describes one of the monsters.
  • June 12, 2007
    Earnest
    I dunno, I like Fantasy Kitchen Sink too. It describes pretty well how everything was thrown in there, including monsters and genre's (mixing fantasy fairies and gothic vampires can't be that easy).

    But because I'm a compulsive namer: Fantasy By Appointment Only ^_^
  • June 12, 2007
    MisterSix
    Consciously subverted in the Felix Castor books, in which the ghosts, weremonsters, succubi and demons all have a common origin.
  • June 12, 2007
    Unknown Troper
    For that matter, do we have a trope where every monster or supernatural character all have a common origin, usually one that seems totally implausible for such a variety of lifeforms? The opposite of this trope?
  • June 12, 2007
    Ununnilium
  • June 12, 2007
    Semi-know Troper
    One possibel example-the early state of the Hellboy comics, which assume that just about every mythical creature exists, I remember enjoying the latest trade paperback because it provided a general origin story for everything not related to the main arc.

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