Created By: WaxingName on December 2, 2012 Last Edited By: WaxingName on December 9, 2012
Troped

Disapproving Look

ಠ_ಠ

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NOTE: If you are going to tag this, PLEASE specify that you tagged it and put your reason in the comments below.

Sometimes, when you need to show your disapproval, you don't need to speak. All you need to display your disapproval is that look.

It's not quite an angry or tense look; it's more of a look that says "really?" Generally, the one giving the glance has his or her brow lowered a little bit, with either a flat face or very slight frown with pursed lips. Often, the glancer has arms folded for extra disapproval effect.

This expression is commonly found on two types of characters. One is priests, clerics, or other religious figures. The other is the housewife, generally the long-suffering variety, who tends to give this to both her bumbling husband and her misbehaving children.

In manga, this is accompanied with the Japanese onomatopoeia jii~ or jiro jiro.

Compare its "edgier" counterparts, Death Glare and Kubrick Stare. Facepalm has a nearly identical effect.

Examples:

Film

Literature
  • During the weighing of the wands in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Harry gets this from Fleur as he hastily tries to clean his wand, accidentally shooting some sparks in the process.

Live-Action TV
  • One Saturday Night Live sketch had its humor revolve around the shots of several coworkers giving disapproving glances to an employee who mistakenly submitted "You're the One that I Want" from Grease.
  • In Home Improvement, "The Look" is discussed by Tim and his coworkers after Tim gets basketball season tickets and Jill gives him "The Look". Later in the same scene, Harry's wife gives him The Look, and all of his coworkers react in horror.
  • In the Mama's Family show (and its predecessor sketches on The Carol Burnett Show), both Eunice (Carol Burnett) and Mama (Vicki Lawrence) often did this when they were angry with another character.
  • This was practically Shepherd Book's default expression whenever he was around Mal on Firefly.
  • In Lois and Clark, Superman frequently gave this look to lawbreakers, though usually minor ones. His glares were reserved for the likes of Lex Luthor and others like him.
  • On Dinosaurs Earl was on the receiving end of one more than once from his wife, Fran.
  • In The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Will often gave this to Carlton when he was acting particularly childish.

Video Games
  • In several games in the Rhythm Heaven series, some of the characters will give the player character a disapproving look if you mess up the rhythm.

Western Animation
  • In the SpongeBob SquarePants episode "MuscleBob BuffPants", Sandy gives Spongebob a well-deserved look of disapproval once it's exposed that he used fake rubber muscles.

Community Feedback Replies: 30
  • December 3, 2012
    Arivne
    Live Action TV
    • In the Mamas Family show (and its predecessor sketches on The Carol Burnett Show), both Eunice (Carol Burnett) and Mama (Vicki Lawrence) often did this when they were angry with another character.
  • December 3, 2012
    WaxingName
    Yes, I believe this is tropeworthy. I know it sounds a lot like a Death Glare, but it's really a softer version of it.
  • December 3, 2012
    ArkadyDarell
    ...can I just nominate this pic? (It's a crop from the Dungeons And Dragons splatbook Dungeonscape.)
  • December 3, 2012
    WaxingName
    ^I prefer something a little closer to the face so that the focal point is clearly the face.
  • December 3, 2012
    ArkadyDarell
    Assuming you didn't mean "let's use something else entirely", here's a large-res version of the whole pic in PNG format. I figure it'll be more efficient for you to crop and resize to what you had in mind than me trying to guess. >>
  • December 4, 2012
    WaxingName
    ^Good. I'll add it once this page gets approved.
  • December 4, 2012
    WaxingName
    Changed to Disapproving Look because I feel it's a better name.
  • December 4, 2012
    Tallens
    • This was practically Shepherd Book's default expression whenever he was around Mal on Firefly.
  • December 5, 2012
    ArkadyDarell
    ^ Probably the default expression of fictional clerics/priests/ministers/preachers/whatever in general, really. And parents and the long-suffering variety of housewife.
  • December 5, 2012
    Tallens
    • During the weighing of the wands in Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire, Harry gets this from Fleur as he hastily tries to clean his wand, accidentally shooting some sparks in the process.

    • In Lois And Clark, Superman frequently gave this look to lawbreakers, though usually minor ones. His glares were reserved for the likes of Lex Luthor and others like him.

    That may apply to more, or most, versions of him, but this is the one I'm most familiar with.
  • December 5, 2012
    DracMonster
    Just want to say the laconic wins at least half a dozen or so internets.
  • December 6, 2012
    Tallens
    • On Dinosaurs Earl was on the receiving end of one more than once from his wife, Fran.
  • December 6, 2012
    Tuckerscreator
  • December 6, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    I like the TLJ image better than the D&D one.
  • December 6, 2012
    WaxingName
    I do too. I just need a cropped version of that image.
  • December 6, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    [1] - edited to link _rA
  • December 7, 2012
    WaxingName
    ^Looks great! That will be our page image, though I'll still accept other suggestion.
  • December 7, 2012
    WaxingName
    Why are people tagging this as "Tropeworthy?" Can anyone give a reason as to why they're tagging it like that?
  • December 7, 2012
    DracMonster
    Two different people may have hit it at the same time.
  • December 7, 2012
    WaxingName
    ^I know that, but I want a reason as to why people don't think this is tropeworthy.
  • December 7, 2012
    Tallens
    Probably for the same reason I've been seeing People Sit On Chairs being thrown around a little to much. My guess is there's a lack of understanding of what exactly a Trope is and what PSOC refers to.
  • December 7, 2012
    WaxingName
    ^Well, I know this YKTTW is clearly not PSOC. If it was, Death Glare would be there, too.
  • December 7, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    It is not chairs -- it's clearly a meaning-shortcut -- but "by comparison" is not a good defense. "This other thing is also bad" is not a point in favor of the first thing. TVT isn't a courtroom: invoking precedent often results in the old being called into question, rather than supporting the new.
  • December 7, 2012
    Tallens
    I know you know. You were asking why people were putting the Tropeworthy tag on,and I was making a guess why.
  • December 7, 2012
    WaxingName
    ^^Honestly, there are times when I prefer that the old be called into question. Most of the tropes I have proposed and launched on YKTTW have been based around old tropes. If the old is called into question, at least I know that something I propose isn't a trope and that there's a TRS thread that I'm willing to support
  • December 9, 2012
    Mauri
    Example: Film:
    • Kronks New Groove: The whole reason Kronk does everything to avoid this. It is called "The Nostril Flare of Total Rejection".
  • December 9, 2012
    SeptimusHeap
    With no reason being given, I'd say this is a trope. These things don't just happen because they can happen, there is usually a point behind doing that.
  • December 9, 2012
    doorhandle
    I have two exsamples of this trope from Dr.mcninja, summarised here and here.
  • December 9, 2012
    justanid
    Anime & Manga
    • Often accompanied by jii~ or jiro jiro (onomatopoea for staring) in many an anime & manga.
  • December 9, 2012
    tuypo1
    i say its ready

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