Created By: dalek955April 4, 2011 Last Edited By: dalek955August 22, 2014
Nuked

My Sword Is Thirsty

A nutcase thinks that his weapons need to be fed.

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Trope
Needs A Better Title, A Better Description, More Examples, and An Index. Seen It A Million Times. Do We Have This? Rolling Updates.
There are many ways to tell if an unknown warrior is bad news. He may have Spikes Of Villainy, evil-looking scars, or carry gruesome trophies around. But the absolute worst sign of them all, is when he declares that My Sword Is Thirsty.

This trope instantly identifies the character as being Ax Crazy, a Blood Knight, or otherwise dangerously crazy. He almost certainly kills just For The Evulz, and generally doesn't even try to channel it. He might even be an Omnicidal Maniac.

A form of I Call It Vera in that the wielder anthropomophizes the weapon, to the point of believing that it has desires of its own. Not to be confused with an actual Hungry Sword, although those are generally a bad sign too.

Examples:

Anime & Manga
  • Kisame from Naruto often shreds his victims some more, just because Samehada is still thirsty.

Video Games
Community Feedback Replies: 70
  • April 4, 2011
    TwoGunAngel
  • April 4, 2011
    dalek955
    Does someone describe Frostmourne as hungry? Whether or not it's actually an Evil Weapon doesn't matter here; the trope is when someone actually says the line.
  • April 4, 2011
    TwoGunAngel
    @dalek955 The quote I gave is spoken by none other than Frostmourne's wielder, Arthas Menethil, better known as the Lich King.
  • April 4, 2011
    Pirorin
    This might also be a case when the weapon possesses the wielder, in order to feed on blood/souls/etc.
  • April 5, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    • Skurai from the mahnwa Ragnarok very much. He might even say the exact words. Of course his sword is evil and half-possessing/Brainwashing him and literally needs to drink blood (aka butcher people), so...it's almost justified in a way. There is no reason why he has to be such a Big Ham about it, though. That's just tasty, gratuitous villainy.
  • April 5, 2011
    Lysythe
    Elric of Melnibone.
  • April 5, 2011
    Lavalyte
    Similarly there is the Samurai (?) notion that a sword, once out of the scabbard, must spill blood before it can be returned.
  • April 5, 2011
    Stratadrake
    See also I Call It Vera, for the naming of weapons. This obviously extends further, where the weapons are not just (or necessarily) named, but anthropomorphized, treating said weapons as if they have a will or desire of their own.
  • April 5, 2011
    Cidolfas
    The sword in Lloyd Alexander's The Remarkable Journey of Prince Jen. It literally asks for blood to drink, until at a crucial time it decides it's had enough, and jumps out of the hands of its wielder.
  • April 5, 2011
    deuxhero
    One dialog option early in Way Of The Samurai 2 is "once drawn my sword must taste blood" when given the option to spare the Goldfish Poop Gang. The local Blood Knight is gaga if you chose it.
  • April 10, 2011
    Umptyscope
    In the novel The Misenchanted Sword by Lawrence Watt-Evans, the hero (who is an old innkeeper at this point in the novel) is attacked by two thieves, who know that he has "a magic sword that can kill people." In truth, his sword is enchanted and undefeatable - but only for killing one person at a time. The innkeeper tries invoking this trope to bluff the second thief into running away.
  • April 10, 2011
    ccoa
    • From Fire Emblem (Gameboy Advance):
      Jerme: Hyaa ha ha ha haaa! That's Lord Nergal's doing! He knows how much I like to slice through people. He lets me do it as often as I want, which really is all the time. He's after something he calls 'quintessence'... I care nothing for it, but... as long as he keeps bringing me people to slash and cut! I am Jerme! The finest assasin the Black Fang has ever known! Now come! My blade hungers!!
  • April 10, 2011
    dryunya
    The savages in Fallout 2. Not sure about the exact words here, though.
  • April 13, 2011
    dalek955
  • April 20, 2011
    pureWasted
    StarCraft II. Dark Templar say "My blade thirsts for vengeance."
  • April 21, 2011
    elwoz
    I recommend we divide the examples into those where the blade really is thirsty (an Evil Weapon along the lines of Stormbringer, Morganti knives, etc) and those where it isn't (the Ax Crazy is all in the wielder's head -- can't think of an example, although it seems like something Logen Ninefingers or one of his, um, friends might have said).
  • April 21, 2011
    elwoz
    ... on further thought, Evil Weapon seems to have the "blade really is thirsty" trope covered already; maybe this one should be restricted to the case where it's not.
  • April 21, 2011
    Rolf
    I do know japanese mythos include requirement to have swords taste blood before being put back in, otherwise it will cause unrest in order to do so.

    There was same for bodyguard for one charactor in babylon 5, but I forgot details...
  • April 21, 2011
    Bushranger
    • Torg from Sluggy Freelance has a magic sword ("Chaz") that glows red, speaks, and becomes SUPER EFFECTIVE for a period after it's been bathed in the blood of an innocent.
  • April 21, 2011
    dalek955
    This trope is strictly of when the wielder is Ax Crazy enough to say the line. He could have an actual Evil Weapon, but for our purposes that doesn't matter.
  • April 22, 2011
    peccantis
    • The Kalevala: Kullervo speaks to his sword after a murderous revenge spree and contemplating suicide. The sword speaks its mind and replies that it wouldn't mind eating guilty flesh and flawed blood just as fine as innocent flesh and blood.
  • April 22, 2011
    captainbrass2
    • Pretty much exactly the same scenario plays out between Turin Turambar and his sword Gurthang in The Silmarillion. This is not entirely surprising, since The Kalevala, a Finnish epic, was an influence on J.R.R. Tolkien.
  • April 22, 2011
    terrafox
    Episode 04 of La Blue Girl featured a sword whose spirit actually did thrive on blood and sexual stimulation. It drove its wielder to carry out acts of mass slaughter, followed by immediate stimulation. Given this is La Blue Girl, the sexual part should be no surprise.
  • April 22, 2011
    dalek955
    I keep getting examples of Evil Weapons That Speak. I don't want that!! This is about the WIELDER!!! How is that not clear by now?!
  • April 22, 2011
    elwoz
    > I keep getting examples of Evil Weapons That Speak. I don't want that!! This is about the WIELDER!!!

    Probably means the description needs some work.
  • May 2, 2011
    dalek955
    A good test for examples here is "If I replaced the weapon with an ordinary hunk of steel, would the wielder still say this?"
  • May 10, 2011
    Hodou
  • May 10, 2011
    Chabal2
  • May 10, 2011
    Augustine
    Literally used in Ravenor with a vampire blade.
  • May 10, 2011
    TippyToeZombie
    Power Rangers Samurai has Deker constantly saying this about his sword Uramasa.
  • May 10, 2011
    ElaineRose
    A possible inversion/aversion in Babylon5. The Narn have a special warrior's sword (that is totally not a katana) which tradition mandates cannot be re-sheathed until it has tasted blood. In one episode this trope was lampshaded, and later the proud warrior from the agrarian culture drew the sword for effect. He discretely cut his palm before putting the sword away.
  • May 10, 2011
    PaleHorse87
    Real Life
    • The kukri used by Gurkhas are said to need to draw blood whenever they are drawn. This is probably because they get tired of people asking to see the kukri, probably.
  • May 10, 2011
    Rolf
    I talked about this but apparently OP didn't think it was viable example. With better formatting guy might accept it this time.

    Maybe remove the second probably word though. ;)
  • May 10, 2011
    Ryuuma

    • The Muramasa swords in legend drive the wielder mad and force him to spill blood, any blood when wielded.
    • During the CP 9 arc, Zoro says something of this effect to his opponent Kaku.
  • May 11, 2011
    Rolf
    Babylon 5 had an alien with similiar rule as kukri real life example above, but I can't recall charactor name.
  • May 11, 2011
    Shalriek
    The comments seem to be talking about two seperate tropes here, one where the wielder is a nutcase with a weapon and insists that it needs feeding, the other where a character has a weapon that cannot be sheathed without drawing blood. Incidentally the knives made from sandworm teeth in Dune follow the second trope.
  • May 11, 2011
    dalek955
    This trope is just the nutcase thing. The second kind would go under Evil Weapon. Thanks for spelling that out.
  • May 11, 2011
    Ryuuma
    Ok, pen out the Muramasa example. The other one, howeverm fits.
  • May 11, 2011
    elwoz
    The Dune crysknives and the real life kukri aren't EvilWeapons either, though; it's a cultural tradition. (I agree they don't go here.)
  • May 11, 2011
    billybobfred
    I made a joke on this trope in an MSPA forum adventure I ran.

    ... Though, this is gonna be the kind of trope that people have an instinctive revulsion to seeing a Troper Tales tab on, isn't it? Oh well, still useful for defining the trope.
  • May 12, 2011
    Shalriek
    So this is best described as 'Delusional Weapon Thirst'? If the weapon geniunely is bloodthirsty, or deludes its wielder into thinking that it is, it's an EvilWeapon.

    The other trope is something like 'Honourbound Bloodshed'/'Honourbound Bloodletting' but again, if it absolutely MUST have blood, it's another EvilWeapon.

    Just trying to get this straight in my head >_<
  • May 12, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    I don't see how it makes a difference whether the sword is an Evil Weapon or the character is crazy, personally. It usually amounts tot he same thing unless the sword is flat out telepathic and telling the wielder it's thirsty, either way the phrase is from the wielder's head.
  • May 14, 2011
    chronotwister
    lots of demonic swords actualy need souls for power and thus there wielders will often say justly say that there blade is thirsty
  • May 15, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    ^Yes but I'm saying they could just say "My sword is running out of energy, I need to kill something", but they personify it and say "It's Thirsty" because they are hammy. Unless we hear the sword actually say 'it's thirsty' to the person, it's just as likely that the person said it to be campy as it is the sword actually saying so in that way.
  • May 15, 2011
    Korodzik
    ^^^^^ billybobfred, why Troper Tale? It fits as an example.
  • May 15, 2011
    peccantis
    Created YKTTW for Hungry Sword, added qualifying examples from above comments there.

    Drawing the line according to how we learn of the weapon's hunger.

    • My Sword Is Thirsty = wielder claims weapon needs to be fed
    • Hungry Sword = weapon itself or the narrator says the weapon is thirsty (and the narrator is reliable enough)
  • May 15, 2011
    peccantis
    Btw, are you taking examples where the sword is evil and sentient, i.e. potentially actually hungry, but the narrator or the sword never address the matter, only the wielder?
  • May 15, 2011
    redpyro
    according to Zoro, the cursed sword he bought seems to like hurting his oponents a bit too much (I'm not sure if he actually uses the word "hungry" to describe it, but it gets near enough)
  • May 15, 2011
    peccantis
    ^ the "CP 9 arc" Zoro? Which series and media?
  • May 15, 2011
    billybobfred
    ^^^^^ Because it's a thing I did. I'm not sure where the line is between "otherwise ordinary example a troper was involved in" and "Troper Tales junk most people don't care about", but I figured fewer would complain about putting the first in the second's place than the reverse error.
  • May 16, 2011
    hevendor717
    Creeps who say this may also be seen Licking The Blade.
  • May 16, 2011
    Deboss
    Are you attached to the name? I was going to suggest My Weapon Hungers.
  • May 16, 2011
    Riddlewizard
    Flames of Recca does this with one of the two water-and-ice elemental blades, Ensui I believe.
  • May 17, 2011
    redpyro
    ^^^^^ Zoro is a character from the anime/manga One Piece, he fights with three swords but only one of them is cursed (which is the "hungry" one).
  • May 18, 2011
    aurora369
    In Children Of Hurin, Turin's life ends much like Cullervo's described above. Justified by Turin being an Expy of Cullervo.
  • May 18, 2011
    peccantis
    ^listed above
  • May 19, 2011
    Jackerel
    Team Fortress 2 has the Eyelander. Turns out, it does need souls, though.
  • May 19, 2011
    peccantis
    ^Thet's be Hungry Sword, listed at another YKTTW. Read the Laconic of this one. Swiping.

    As a suggestiong fot YKTTW sponsor of this one, maybe you whould put italics on "thinks" on the Laconic.
  • May 20, 2011
    Riddlewizard
    There's an old superstition that blades (not cooking knives, though, for some reason.....) that have "tasted" human blood due to a major cut (on purpose or by accident) will want more- to the effect of constantly hurting people in some way or another and/or bringing bad luck/death to their owner- old murder weapons especially. There are many so-called cursed blades and cursed swords in legend and mythology. A famous non-blade example of the superstition is the Hope Diamond, who's owners lives all reportedly ended badly (one was killed by a pack of dogs), until a museum got hold of it.
  • May 27, 2011
    dalek955
    the Hope Diamond would be an Artifact Of Death. Epileptic Tree: Being in the Smithsonian means that it's owned by the government...the same government that's now presiding over three disastrous wars and the second-worst financial crisis in American history...
  • May 27, 2011
    Hadashi
    There's the Morrowind Mod Lilicor, though since Lilicor is a crazy talking sword it's HIM who thinks he needs to be fed.
  • June 14, 2011
    Nocturna
    @dalek: Changing the first sentence of the last paragraph of the explanation to "A form of I Call It Vera in that the wielder anthropomophizes the weapon, to the point of believing that it has desires of its own, even though it actually does not." may help make the distinction between this trope and Hungry Sword clearer.
  • June 24, 2011
    billybobfred
    Team Fortress 2 also has the Half-Zatoichi, which, once drawn, can't be put away until it kills. The description plays it up as a matter of honor, but it's never made clear whether it's this trope (and the Demoman or Soldier is overriding the player) or a genuine Hungry Sword.
  • June 24, 2011
    alethiophile
    I don't know if Gaara pre-Heel Face Turn in Naruto counts as this; he says something similar about the sand that he uses to kill people, but the sand is controlled by a demon bound to him and he thinks the demon is his mother.
  • June 25, 2011
    peccantis
    ^^ I'll create a new YKTTW for that type of case. Look for Honorbound Sword.
  • July 11, 2011
    billybobfred
    -poke-
  • January 18, 2013
    elwoz
    I think this is done except that I really don't like the title: I think people will not understand that it's not a specific kind of Evil Weapon. Suggestions please?
  • August 15, 2014
    DAN004
    Bump

    May wanna grab this as well.
  • August 22, 2014
    DAN004
    Changed my mind; No New Stock Phrases.

    Discard plz.
  • August 22, 2014
    dalek955
    ^Sure.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable