Created By: TSims on September 13, 2017 Last Edited By: TSims on 17 hours ago

Sleek High-Rise Apartment

Sleek modern high rise apartment that overlooks the city.

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Related to Cool House, this trope is for characters who live in a sleek modern high rise apartment that overlooks the cityscape. Stainless Steel appliances, and fine arts are optional. Maybe it comes with a 360 view of the city, with a car elevator, indoor pool and a retractable skylight if applicable.. Could also over lap with a Cool Condo. And the height suggests power, (especially if they're a member of the Fiction 500): a mogul or baron likes to survey their domain. The setting conveys wealth, isolation, and influence, in the midst of teeming midtown. Said apartment is usually a indication of the character's chic style and taste. Inhabitants might be Wicked Cultured as well.

The Jeffersons could be a Trope Codifier: a married couple with a grown son (Lionel) that has moved out. George has his dry cleaning business keeping him nicely monied, and there are some wacky neighbors available for Comic Relief or for drama fodder. Much of the plot is confined to a limited space, which is ideal for television studio shooting.

See also: Big Fancy House

Examples

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    Comic Books 
  • Reed Richards and the rest of the Fantastic Four were able to secure the top five floors of the Baxter Building in Lower Manhattan. Only 1½ floors are living space, while the rest are dedicated to laboratories and a repository of items too dangerous to go uncontained. By the time that Marvel Comics put John Byrne on the title, Reed had purchased the entire building. Though Reed is definitely not ostentatious, his growing family and Gadgeteer Genius skills mean the Four rarely lack for appurtenances.

    Films — Live-Action 
  • The Comedian was murdered by being thrown out of his own New York high rise window in Watchmen. Putting in motion the entire plot of the film.
  • In the film Predator 2 The titular Predator murdered a bunch of folks inside of one, following a raid by Jamaican gangsters on a Colombian drug lord mid coitus. Said high rise also over looks downtown L.A..
  • This aesthetic is exploited in The Loft by a cabal of yuppies, who collectively lease a luxury apartment with a towering view of the city. They maintain this place as a "love den" for seducing cute babes, giving the illusion that they're wealthy moguls rather than the salarymen they are. The plot escalates when one partner discovers evidence of horrific carnage when it's his turn to use the loft.
  • The narrator in Film/Fight Club (and its source novel) describes his home as a "filing cabinet for young professionals", a high-rise apartment block. He's no longer able to live there after someone blows up his apartment.
  • Industrial magnate Eldon Tyrell from Blade Runner occupies a plush suite within the massive industrial Tyrell Pyramid. It's appointed with a subdued elegance: not quite Spartan, but clearly more functional than flashy. This man is effectively married to his work.

     Live Action TV  
  • The Jeffersons: This spinoff from "All in the Family" is about literal upward mobility of an African- American couple named George and Louise Jefferson who move into a swanky high-rise building. George and Louise started out as one dry cleaner in Astoria, Queens. Their series has George's dry cleaning expand to multiple facilities, enabling the couple to move into a luxury condo on the Upper East Side of Manhattan.
  • Jessica Jones: Killgrave invades several of these as is his penchant for hedonistically indulging in the finer things in life at a whim.
  • The Steve Harvey Show: Steve Hightower who was a 1970s funk legend (who is now a highschool music teacher/vice-principal) lives in one of these, overlooking Chicago. Probably a hold over from his more lucrative career as a musician.
  • Stringer Bell from The Wire who has a high rise apartment showing his sophistication. The police are genuinely surprised when they discover his refined and elegant penthouse, full of classical books and styled very differently from the archetypal mansion of a drug-lord. Also has a great view of the city.

    Western Animation 
  • Rick and Morty: In "Rest and Ricklaxation", Healthy Morty moves to New York and makes a lot of money as a stock broker with his new found Lack of Empathy. He is shown to have been living in an apartment with a wall of windows looking over NY.
  • David Xanatos is usually the arch-nemesis to the Gargoyles, and hatches his XanatosGambits from his penthouse suite, perched atop his corporate offices. Xanatos likes to survey Manhattan from his towering perch, since he intends to make it all his personal domain.

Community Feedback Replies: 27
  • September 13, 2017
    Madam-Shogun-Assassin
    • The Comedian was thrown out of his own high rise window in Watchmen
    • A Predator murdered a bunch of folks inside of one, in the film Predator2
  • September 14, 2017
    TSims
    Steve Harvey lived in one in The Steve Harvey Show
  • September 14, 2017
    Arivne

    Zero Context Examples have been marked as such. They need more information to show how they fit the trope. Please don't remove the marking unless you add enough context.

    Please don't give this proposal any hats until all of the Zero Context Examples have been corrected.
  • September 14, 2017
    TSims
    How about now? I didn't remove the ZCE marks until i was certain context was satisfactory. Also the page wasn't going to get launched anytime soon.
  • September 14, 2017
    Madam-Shogun-Assassin
    I personally think it's fine, but i was also thinking about The Jeffersons I mean they was moving on up :p
  • September 14, 2017
    arbiter099
    • Jessica Jones: Killgrave invades several of these as is his penchant for hedonistically indulging in the finer things in life at a whim.
  • September 15, 2017
    Madam-Shogun-Assassin
    Oh yeah, there's the high rise from the beginning of Cloverfield. And again during the rescue attempt for Rob's girlfriend Beth.
  • September 15, 2017
    WaterBlap
    Presently, this Needs A Better Description. The "trope" is just "there is a particular kind of apartment." What does this kind of apartment say about the character(s) in the work? What does it say about the setting (if anything at all)?

    Take the Cloverfield example mentioned in ^. The apartment is only there in the beginning, and it was probably chosen because the setting was basically New York (IIRC) and there was a party going on. But the apartment is soon forgotten as the characters move through the story, and they never return to it. It's just sort of there in the work, possibly for the sake of convenience. And Beth's apartment was somewhere the characters could get to while being difficult (since they have to climb the stairs to get there).

    I'm adding a bomb because this draft is not ready for launch but somehow has gotten two hats so far.
  • September 15, 2017
    Madam-Shogun-Assassin
    Two totally different locations bruh. The high rise in question is Beth's dad place IIRC. It's actually seen BEFORE the going away party, they go back to the same building to save Beth. Though this is not my post, i would argue what this type of place says about a character is status (obviously).
  • September 15, 2017
    oneuglybunny
    Film Live Action
    • This aesthetic is exploited in The Loft by a cabal of yuppies, who collectively lease a luxury apartment with a towering view of the city. They maintain this place as a "love den" for seducing cute babes, giving the illusion that they're wealthy moguls rather than the salarymen they are. The plot escalates when one partner discovers evidence of horrific carnage when it's his turn to use the loft.
  • September 15, 2017
    oneuglybunny
    Perhaps a little more context for The Jeffersons example: George and Louise started out as one dry cleaner in Astoria, Queens. Their series has George's dry cleaning expand to multiple facilities, enabling the couple to move into a luxury condo on the Upper East Side of Manhattan.
  • September 15, 2017
    WaterBlap
    ^^ "Bro," that's beside the point...

    You say "obviously" and all I can think of is "It was not in the description." It's been added to the description, but I still think this Needs A Better Description.
  • September 15, 2017
    Madam-Shogun-Assassin
    And yet, you haven't offered a better description either. Everyone else is helping, it would be kinda cool if you participated.
  • September 16, 2017
    oneuglybunny
    I get what this proposal is about: it's a setting trope meant to convey a Loner or a childless couple living quite comfortably in an urban setting. A house or mansion would be good for children that aren't grown yet. Apartment dwellers dislike the patter of little feet across the ceiling. And the height suggests power: a mogul or baron likes to survey their domain. The Jeffersons could be a Trope Codifier: a married couple with a grown son (Lionel) that has moved out. George has his dry cleaning business keeping him nicely monied, and there are some wacky neighbors available for Comic Relief or for drama fodder. Much of the plot is confined to a limited space, which is ideal for television studio shooting. So, it's Rich People Are Funny / Rich People Have Problems, Too meets Bottle Episode format. The setting conveys wealth, isolation, and power or influence, in the midst of teeming midtown.
  • September 16, 2017
    TSims
    It's definitely a setting trope, but i wouldn't necessarily say it's about childless couples though. Madam is correct that it's about status and affluence. Probably also signifying how trendy and chic said person is.
  • September 16, 2017
    PistolsAtDawn
    • Daredevil lives in a large, sleek apartment in the Netflix series. It's not in a great part of town, which might be how he affords it.
  • September 16, 2017
    Arcana4th
    • Rick And Morty: In "Rest and Ricklaxation", Healthy Morty moves to New York and makes a lot of money as a stock broker and his new found Lack Of Empathy. He is shown to have been living in an apartment with a wall of windows looking over NY.
  • September 16, 2017
    Madam-Shogun-Assassin
    I don't think Daredevil count, cause that was a dusty Loft which should be it's on setting trope now that i think about it. lol

    A better choice would be Stringer Bell from The Wire who has a high rise apartment showing his sophistication. The police are genuinely surprised when they discover his refined and elegant penthouse, full of classical books and styled very differently from the archetypal mansion of a drug-lord.
  • yesterday
    TSims
    Totally forgot about Stringer
  • One more. I haven't seen it in ages but i'm almost certain Poltergeist 3 takes place completely inside one of these.
  • yesterday
    oneuglybunny
    Just asking: does it count if the apartment dweller is also the landlord, occupying one suite of many and letting out the rest?
  • yesterday
    WaterBlap
    Somehow the bomb I added was literally removed. For no reason. Re-adding it because the issue I pointed out is still present.

    Madam-Shogun-Assassin, you can cut the attitude. This draft accrued 3 hats for literally no reason, so of course someone is going to point out the problems with the draft. It is helpful for someone to do that because otherwise the pre-maturely launched trope will just go to the TLP crash rescue thread. Nobody wants it to go to the crash rescue thread. Ignoring people's comments, like the one from oneuglybunny about a tighter description, will eventually lead to the trope needing much more help in the future.
  • There's no "attitude" on my part. And yes, it's a issue to you, but from my POV the issue is fixed. The description is MUCH better now. I just fail to see the problem. And it definitely wasn't me who removed the bomb.
  • 22 hours ago
    Folamh3
    • The narrator in Fight Club (and its source novel) describes his home as a "filing cabinet for young professionals", a high-rise apartment block. He's no longer able to live there after someone blows up his apartment.
  • 21 hours ago
    TSims
    For the record i didn't move the bomb either. I didn't even know you could lol
  • 21 hours ago
    TSims
    Also oneuglybunny suggestions was incorporated into the header. He made some great contributions IMO.
  • 19 hours ago
    oneuglybunny
    Well, thank you, Tropers.Tsims and Tropers.WaterBlap, for the pat on the back. :)

    Going forward with the idea that a swanky midtown apartment dweller can also be the building's landlord or property manager:

    Comic Books
    • Reed Richards and the rest of the Fantastic Four were able to secure the top five floors of the Baxter Building in Lower Manhattan. Only 1 floors are living space, while the rest are dedicated to laboratories and a repository of items too dangerous to go uncontained. By the time that Marvel Comics put John Byrne on the title, Reed had purchased the entire building. Though Reed is definitely not ostentatious, his growing family and Gadgeteer Genius skills mean the Four rarely lack for appurtenances.

    Film
    • Industrial magnate Eldon Tyrell from Blade Runner occupies a plush suite within the massive industrial Tyrell Pyramid. It's appointed with a subdued elegance: not quite Spartan, but clearly more functional than flashy. This man is effectively married to his work.

    Western Animation
    • David Xanatos is usually the arch-nemesis to the Gargoyles, and hatches his XanatosGambits from his penthouse suite, perched atop his corporate offices. Xanatos likes to survey Manhattan from his towering perch, since he intends to make it all his personal domain.

    Oh, and that part about childless: it kind of throws off the aesthetic if, say, Tony Stark has to tiptoe around a litter of LEGO bricks on the floor, and push aside MLP figures before sitting down. Also, small, sticky handprints tend to monkeywrench the decor. So, yeah, you might wanna de-children-ize your setting before trotting it out for display.
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