Created By: JusticeMan on November 29, 2011 Last Edited By: JusticeMan on December 2, 2011

Pantheon Motiifs

Repeated Tropes Present within Pantheons

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Community Feedback Replies: 18
  • November 30, 2011
    jate88
    These seem like archetypes which I'm not sure if that's what they're looking for on this site.
  • November 30, 2011
    FrodoGoofballCoTV
    Sky Father, etc. could be legitimate tropes, and this could be the index... or this could also be a trope for a pantheon that follows a certain pattern, similar to Command Roster or Five Man Band. You may want to make sure we've already got at least several tropes for the deity roles.
  • November 30, 2011
    ChunkyDaddy

    • Door gods - Janus, Ganesha
    • Wisdom/Knowledge gods - Athena, Minerva, Saraswati
    • War gods - Odin, Indra
    • Water gods - Poseidon, Ganga
    • Fire Gods - Agni, Prometheus

  • November 30, 2011
    BooleanEarth
    I really feel like each of these need to be its own trope. That said, whichever we decide, I can think of assloads of examples.
  • November 30, 2011
    Maklodes
    Trickster Archetype: Loki, Hermes, Set, Hanuman?
  • November 30, 2011
    BooleanEarth
    ^Sun Wukong as well.
  • December 1, 2011
    jate88
  • December 1, 2011
    Irrisia
    There's both an overlap and a distinct separation of deities of love and sex and fertility. Up to you if you think they're the same or not.

    • Love deities - Aphrodite, Venus, Aine, Hathor, Shelyn
    • Sex deities - Frigg, Ishtar, Bes, Bastet, Astarte, Aphrodite. Callistrae

    • The Hunter - Woden, Cernunnos, Artemis, Diana, Erastil
  • December 1, 2011
    ChunkyDaddy
    Add Kama to love/sex dieties

    I am beggining to think that this trope doesn't really belong on this wiki. This should really go into some sort of religion wiki. Remember that "This wiki is a catalog of the tricks of the trade for writing fiction." I think religion tropes belong here if they are being referred to in popular art.
  • December 1, 2011
    Micah
    I disagree; not only is much of our conception of mythology codified by people who were perfectly aware they were writing fiction, modern creators constructing pantheons as part of World Building are also likely to work along these lines.

    This needs a lot of clarification, though.
  • December 1, 2011
    ChunkyDaddy
    ^ "modern creators constructing pantheons as part of World Building are also likely to work along these lines."

    Yes and when common story-telling devices used in popular arts mirror story-telling devices used in mythology, then they deserve being tropes. However, I don't see the point of troping something that is far beyond being a Forgotten Trope, For example, I don't see the point of documenting Vedic meter when it's practically not used by anyone.
  • December 1, 2011
    FrodoGoofballCoTV
    You might find some related tropes under Angelic Tropes, God Tropes, Religion Tropes, and Tropes Of The Divine. This should probably go in Tropes Of The Divine.
  • December 1, 2011
    Trotzky
    Gods sit on Chairs.
  • December 1, 2011
    BooleanEarth
    ^^^^^Mythology is a type of literature, and one that has specifically influence every part of modern culture. You can find these tropes everywhere, and they are tropes. Not to mention the fact that we do have plenty of religion and mythology tropes already. This site is about culture, of which these things are a part.

    ^^^These are still in use today in many modern Mythopoeias and in works based on or inspired by antiquated mythology.

    ^Hardly. It's an Omnipresent Trope in religion and mythology, for sure, but one that still has meaning.

    All that said, I still think each of these deserves its own trope. This page could be an index. And they're really more archetypes than motifs.
  • December 1, 2011
    JusticeMan
    Yeah I could go with an index, as Morrison's JLA and Transformers The Thirteen show, the motifs are repeated through fiction. Maybe some kind of Deity type Chart?
  • December 2, 2011
    jate88
    This has got me wondering. What is the difference between an archetype and a trope?
  • December 2, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    An archetype is a generic character on which later copies/variations are based (an Ur Example). The Hero is an archetype as well as a trope. A trope is not limited to characters (plots, settings, costumes, even lighting and camera effects are tropes). Both tropes and archetypes prompt recognition and create expectations in an audience; of course, those expectations may not be fulfilled, but they're still brought to mind.
  • December 2, 2011
    jate88
    I remember reading somewhere that archetypes can be events or artifacts as well. I thought it was on the Other Wiki but now I can't find it.

    Does The Wonka cover the artist-scientist archetype?

    There's also a Psychopomp page if you want to look for examples on it.
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