Created By: Leporidae on May 26, 2017 Last Edited By: Leporidae on June 26, 2017
Troped

Ripping Off The String Of Pearls

A woman wearing a prominent string of pearls is likely to get them yanked off her neck... or rip them off herself.

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trope
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/pearls_image_01.jpg
Above: a type one example of this trope. Below: a type two example.

When a lady in a visual medium is wearing a lovely string of pearls around her neck, the odds of a Dramatic Necklace Removal occurring skyrocket. Why? Because removing jewelry with such force that it breaks is great for drama, and the individual pearls look awesome in slow motion as they clatter to the ground. Similar to Priceless Ming Vase or Ashes to Crashes — when you see this item, you can expect it to be broken.

Whereas a Dramatic Necklace Removal is focused on the retrieval of a Plot Coupon in the form of a necklace, this trope relies on the symbolism of a pearl necklace coming undone by force. As such, the trope leans on the symbolic connotations that pearls have: pearls are considered a very feminine gem, and are often used to represent classic beauty and elegance in a character. note  Strings of pearls can also indicate that a character is wealthy (usually Old Money) or at least connected to the upper class. Any girl wearing a string of pearls is likely on her way to (or just returning from) a fancy event. If she's an Action Girl wearing them in a dangerous situation, it can be an indication that she's about to start Kicking Ass in All Her Finery.

This trope generally comes in two flavors:

  1. Pearls Ripped Off By an Assailant: If the pearls are ripped off by an assailant, it indicates that the wearer is dealing with a dangerous or cruel enemy. She's in a confrontation that's turning violent, she's likely not dressed for battle, and someone who is willing to damage an expensive piece of jewelry like that obviously has no qualms about damaging the person wearing the jewelry.
  2. Pearls Ripped Off By the Wearer: If the wearer rips off her own pearls, she's indicating a visceral rejection of everything the pearls represent to her; wealth, femininity, or even a suitor if those pearls were a gift. Or she might just be Genre Savvy enough to use the multitude of small, round pearls to create hazardous terrain around her.

This trope can also work with beaded necklaces, but the impact is diminished when the beads are made of less precious stones, glass, or macaroni.

Can be played for laughs if the characters break a necklace and then scramble to pick up the individual beads afterwards.


Examples of this trope include:

Advertising
  • A 1988 advert for the Volkswagen Golf features a woman who has obviously just been dumped (or caught her man cheating) divesting herself of his gifts. She slams the door behind her as she leaves his flat, then dumps her ring back through the mail slot. She starts off down the street and rips off her pearl necklace before chucking it in a bin. She also chucks an expensive looking brooch and dumps her fur coat, but she chooses to keep the VW Golf as it was more reliable than the man!
  • A 2014 television commercial for Dior's J'adore perfume features Charlize Theron climbing out of a gilded, baroque-style room on a length of champagne-colored silk. She stops to remove her shoes before climbing, but as she nears the top of her ascent she rips off a collar of golden pearls around her neck . The camera cuts away to show the pearls clattering to the ground around her discarded shoes, several stories below her, as she emerges from the sumptuously decorated rooms into a gleaming, futusitic cityscape. A voiceover stating that "the past can be beautiful, but it's no place to live" seemingly links the pearls to the idea of the past — just as she leaves "the past" by literally moving from the antique-styled interior to the more modern exterior, she cuts ties with "the past" metaphorically by removing the necklace.

Anime and Manga
  • In Rurouni Kenshin, Yumi's necklace is undone and the pearls fly everywhere as she's stabbed by Shishio, who's trying to stab Kenshin.

Comics

Film - Animated
  • In Cinderella, the sequence where the ugly stepsisters ruin Cinderella's first gown is kicked off when Drizella wrenches a string of blue beads off Cinderella's neck. Not quite pearls, but the the overall effect is similar — Anastasia and Drizella proceed to rip the terrified Cinderella's dress to shreds just as their coach is arriving. They exit, and a wide shot shows Cinderella in aftermath of their attack: clutching the remains of her ragged dress, staring in disbelief at the scraps of torn fabric and loose beads at her feet.

Film - Live Action
  • It's Jack Napier who murders Thomas and Martha Wayne in the 1989 Batman, but not before his partner tears the pearls from Martha's throat. Interestingly, the string of pearls comes off in one unbroken string when tugged, but the individual pearls only start to fall after Thomas and Martha are shot.
  • 2005's Batman Begins has Joe Chill yank Martha Wayne's pearls off her neck before shooting her.
  • Played with in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice when Martha Wayne is killed. She backs away when Joe Chill puts the gun in her face, causing her pearl necklace to snag on the gun. When Chill fires, the gun's recoil breaks the string, causing the pearls to scatter — in dramatic slow motion, of course.
  • Exploited by Amy Poehler's character Fairchild Van Waldenberg in Blades of Glory: after Fairchild and Stranz fail to detain Jimmy and Chaz (to stop them from making it to the ice in time to perform their final routine), Fairchild thinks they still have a chance to sabotage the two. She tears off the pearl necklace she's wearing as part of her Marilyn Monroe costume and flicks the pearls onto the ice, causing Chaz to break his ankle when he skates over one and loses his balance. The camera focuses on the single pearl that injures Chaz as it bounces across the ice and into his path.
  • Fred's promotion in The Flintstones leads to him turning into a Rich Jerk, and his behavior ultimately costs him his friendship with Barney. When Wilma confronts him over this, Fred haughtily claims that they don't need the Rubbles because they can buy whatever they want. Wilma says that the Rubbles are worth more than anything Fred could buy, and drives her point home by ripping off the pearl necklace he bought for her.
  • The 2013 adaptation of The Great Gatsby takes a few liberties with the scene right before Daisy's wedding to make it more dramatic (and visually appealing). In both versions, Jordan informs Nick that Tom gifted Daisy a pearl necklace "valued at three hundred and fifty thousand dollars" as an engagement/ wedding present. In the book, a languidly drunken Daisy deposits her pearls into a waste basket next to her bed and tells Jordan to return them. In the film version, Daisy rips the string of pearls off her throat, screaming and crying as she casts them down a long hallway. The magnitude of her action is emphasized by a low angle shot that shows the pearls rolling away from her. The film plays the symbolism of the moment for all it's worth — the shot where Tom draped the pearls around her neck ends when he draws her in for a kiss, cutting to a closeup of the necklace clenched in his hand like a leash. After Daisy's outburst, there's a quick cut showing her mother re-stringing the pearls (with Jordan's assistance) that serves to show how her own family wants her tied down to Tom and his fortune.
  • Invoked in Home Alone 2: Lost in New York — as Kevin is being chased through the streets of New York by crooks Harry and Marv, he stops to buy a bunch of cheap imitation pearl necklaces from a street vendor. Kevin breaks the strings and spills the plastic pearls all over the sidewalk, causing Harry and Marv to slip and fall on their behinds. This gives Kevin enough time to escape.

Literature
  • Invoked in The Wheel of Time by Queen Alliandre. In an audience with the mad self-styled Prophet whose army deposed three of her predecessors, he makes a disapproving remark about her obvious wealth, so she tears off her ornate pearl necklace as a donation to his cause. As a third party observes, the gesture costs her a piece of jewelry to appease the most dangerous man in the country.

Television - Live Action
  • On All My Children, after Gloria discovers her husband Adam's betrayal—he pretended to be stalked and kidnapped in order to test her fidelity, putting her through MONTHS of emotional trauma—she rips off the pearl necklace he gave her and lets the pearls fall to the ground.
  • Veronica of Riverdale owns a string of pearls that were a gift from her father — before he went to prison. In episode 9, when she learns that her parents' dirty dealings have driven Ethel Muggs' family into bankruptcy and caused Mr. Muggs to attempt suicide, she dashes to the locker room so she can cry in private and ends up tearing the pearls off her neck out of disgust with her family's actions. Extra points for doing it in front of a mirror and the Slow-Motion Drop as the pearls bounce off the floor next to her 3-inch heels.

Webcomic
  • Happens accidentally in Lackadaisy. Zib grabs Mitzi's pearl necklace, and when Mitzi pulls away, the necklace breaks and the pearls go everywhere. Afterwards Mitzi scrambles to pick up the pearls.

Western Animation


Community Feedback Replies: 20
  • May 26, 2017
    TyeDyeWildebeest
    • The Flintstones: Fred's job promotion leads to him turning into a Rich Jerk, and his behavior ultimately costs him his friendship with Barney. When Wilma confronts him over this, Fred haughtily claims that they don't need the Rubbles because they can buy whatever they want. Wilma says that the Rubbles are worth more than anything Fred could buy, and drives her point home by ripping off the pearl necklace he bought for her.
  • May 26, 2017
    Exxolon
    Advertisings - an The Eighties advert for a Volkswagen Golf features this - the woman has obviously just been dumped and dumps the ring back through the letterbox, rips off her pearl necklace and chucks it in the bin, chucks a brooch away and dumps a fur coat but chooses to keep the Golf as it was more reliable than the man! [1]
  • May 26, 2017
    Kartoonkid95
    • The Simpsons: Marge gets her pearls ripped off by a mugger in "Strong Arms of the Ma".
  • May 26, 2017
    Leporidae
    TyeDyeWildebeest, Exxolon, Kartoonkid95, those are all great examples, I will add them in.
  • May 26, 2017
    NateTheGreat
    Not pearls or beads, but a related example, you can decide:
    • In the third Anne Of Green Gables book, Anne Of The Island, Anne prepares for her graduation dance. Instead of the pearl necklace that she usually wore, she chooses to wear a pendant on a gold chain that Gilbert had given her the previous Christmas. Unfortunately she doesn't even get to the dance before being told that Gilbert is probably going to announce his engagement to Christine that night. Long story short: all of town thinks Gilbert is courting Christine, but he's just doing a friend a favor by being a guide and escort for his already-engaged sister, the rumor is false. Anne does not react well:
      Anne did not speak. In the darkness she felt her face burning. She slipped her hand inside her collar and caught at the gold chain. One energetic twist and it gave way. Anne thrust the broken trinket into her pocket. Her hands were trembling and her eyes were smarting.
  • May 26, 2017
    Leporidae
    ^ That example is already under Dramatic Necklace Removal (but I think the current entry could benefit from the second quote you included).
  • May 26, 2017
    NateTheGreat
    I was shortening my entry when you replied, sorry for the crossed wires.
  • May 26, 2017
    Getta
    Uh, this relied too much on the imagery of pearl necklace to try to be distinct from Dramatic Necklace Removal. It fails, to me.

    Please consider moving the examples here in there.
  • May 27, 2017
    eroock
    I think this could definitely work separately from Dramatic Necklace Removal. DNR is focused on the retrieval of the object around the victims neck. This trope here is about the symbolism around a pearl necklace coming undone by force, like when it's used as a Rape Discretion Shot.
  • May 27, 2017
    Getta
    ^ oh wait, maybe I found a better reason: it's like one of those tropes where, if it exists, it'll be broken, like Ashes To Crashes or Priceless Ming Vase. So here, whenever you see someone wearing pearl necklace, you can expect it'll be pulled away and broken in the process, right?
  • May 29, 2017
    Leporidae
    eroock, Thank you for phrasing that distinction so succinctly. (I haven't encountered this trope in the wild as a Rape Discretion Shot, so I'm reluctant to add that to the description. If you can think of an example that utilize this trope in that manner, I'd throw it in.

    Getta, thanks for bringing those tropes to my attention. "If it exists, it'll be broken" is a pretty much what I was going for, but I didn't remember that we had a page for Finagles Law.
  • June 8, 2017
    Arivne
  • June 8, 2017
    Leporidae
    Thank you Arivne.
  • June 8, 2017
    MazeMaker
    Adding to the Batman examples:

    This is played with in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice when Martha Wayne is killed. She backs away when Joe Chill puts the gun in her face, causing her pearl necklace to snag on the gun. When Chill fires, the gun's recoil breaks the string, causing the pearls to scatter — in dramatic slow motion, of course.
  • June 9, 2017
    Leporidae
    ^ I'll add that to the "Film - Live Action" section.
  • June 9, 2017
    DustSnitch
    What is the Trope here? Sure, pearl necklaces get broken a lot in fiction, but what does it convey? People also tend to end up laughing a lot in fiction, but it only leads to the trope Evil Laugh when used to convey evil. We don't have a "Laughter In Fiction" trope because that is not a trope.

    There's something here; the Batman, The Great Gatsby, and Riverdale examples (among others) seem to connect the pearls ripping with some sort of trauma, so that may be a trope. But as it is right now, I'm giving it a bomb.
  • June 9, 2017
    Getta
    ^ Check Ashes To Crashes, Rule Of Pool, Fruit Cart. Stuff that will get wrecked when they appear.
  • June 10, 2017
    Leporidae
    ^^ It's not just a trope about necklaces breaking — if it were, all the examples could simply be shuffled away under Dramatic Necklace Removal. This is a trope specifically about what pearls symbolize in fiction + the significance of violently disrupting/ removing such a symbol. Please refer to paragraph 2 of the description:
    "Whereas a Dramatic Necklace Removal is focused on the retrieval of a Plot Coupon in the form of a necklace, this trope relies on the symbolism of a pearl necklace coming undone by force."
    And yes, the pearls ripping is connected to trauma. It can be a visual echo for the emotional trauma a character is feeling (as per the Riverdale and The Great Gatsby examples you cited), or it can add a symbolic layer to an already violent event (as per the Batman examples). It seemed to me that distinction was spelled out clearly in the indented section of the description? If it isn't clear enough, please let me know which part you had trouble understanding so I can rewrite it.
  • June 13, 2017
    DustSnitch
    The problem is that while there are examples of pearls used for symbolism, some examples have no meaning or at least no meaning described in the example.

    The Home Alone 2 example has no significance or symbolism at all, it is only here because pearls are ripped. You could discourage examples like this by removing "Or she might just be Genre Savvy enough to use the multitude of small, round pearls to create hazardous terrain around her."

    The Lackadaisy and The Simpsons example also fail to describe any deeper meaning. stopping here cause i gtg
  • June 15, 2017
    Leporidae
    ^ Not every example has to be a sparkling essay that critically analyzes the trope's usage in a specific work. I would love to flesh out some of the more bare-bones examples, but I have neither the time nor the inclination to read through the entirety of the Lackadaisy archive to locate the one scene mentioned in the example, or to watch an episode of The Simpsons in order to write a better description of a nascent trope's usage in a show I don't exactly care about. If you want to expend that effort in order to expand on any of the examples, please feel free to do so. In fact I welcome the assistance, it's always lovely to have help on these sorts of projects.

    That being said, not every example needs to be played straight. Tropes Are Flexible, not every usage of this trope needs to have to have a deep emotional resonance, and having entries like the one in Home Alone 2 Lost In New York or Blades Of Glory explain how the trope can be invoked/ exploited/ discussed/ justified/ played with. Those are all valid uses of the trope, and the last thing I want to do is discourage the inclusion of those examples.
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