History YouNoTakeCandle / RealLife

22nd Jan '18 7:34:25 AM Racoon7
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** Recently, Twitter has brought back this mode of English-mangling. With only 140 characters, you either sacrifice grammar [[SelfDemonstratingArticle or risk running o]]

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** Recently, Twitter has brought back this mode of English-mangling. With only 140 characters, you either sacrifice grammar [[SelfDemonstratingArticle or risk running o]]out]]
5th Dec '17 7:15:47 PM thevideogameempire
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* Any Russian speaker who has ever tried their hand at classical Russian (i.e., Russian written before the revolution) has realized that the Russian language, not so much in grammar but in spelling, has been greatly simplified in the last century or so. The result is a sort of [[InvertedTrope inversion]] of this trope, temporally speaking: if a nineteenth century Russian speaker came over to take a look at some modern Russian literature, he would sit agape at the enormous impropriety of the modern Russian language; the equivalent, to an English speaker, would be going into the future and finding that everything is written "liek tis, wit hardli ani varyashun in speling rools end leters remoovd at evri oportoonty".

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* Any Russian speaker who has ever tried their hand at classical Russian (i.e., Russian written before the revolution) has realized that the Russian language, not so much in grammar but in spelling, has been greatly simplified in the last century or so. The result is a sort of [[InvertedTrope inversion]] of this trope, temporally speaking: if a nineteenth century Russian speaker came over to take a look at some modern Russian literature, he would sit agape at the enormous impropriety of the modern Russian language; the equivalent, to an English speaker, would be going into the future and finding that everything is written "liek tis, wit hardli ani varyashun in speling rools end leters remoovd at evri oportoonty".oportoonity".
26th Oct '17 5:04:59 AM gophergiggles
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Added DiffLines:

--> '''English Soldier:''' Do you have 404's?
--> '''French Soldier:''' Yes, no... le le le... toaster?
24th Oct '17 6:53:09 PM nombretomado
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* [[ChineseLanguage Chinese (even, and even especially, Classical Chinese)]] has a simple (or even simplistic compared to English) grammar with only a few exotic things, which can lead to the stereotype of Chinese people speaking with simplistic grammar. Masterpieces such as the ''Tao Te Ching'' or ''The Art of War'', when translated literally, would seem to fit this trope. Of course, it didn't prevent them from being such a prestigious civilisation.

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* [[ChineseLanguage [[UsefulNotes/ChineseLanguage Chinese (even, and even especially, Classical Chinese)]] has a simple (or even simplistic compared to English) grammar with only a few exotic things, which can lead to the stereotype of Chinese people speaking with simplistic grammar. Masterpieces such as the ''Tao Te Ching'' or ''The Art of War'', when translated literally, would seem to fit this trope. Of course, it didn't prevent them from being such a prestigious civilisation.
22nd Oct '17 4:30:05 PM spiritsunami
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* ''Very'' common in the Canadian Armed Forces, as their military is entirely bilingual but it's members on an individual level may not be, leading to such conversations between an entirely English and an entirely French soldier trying in vain to communicate to each other. The nickname for a soldier who can barely speak the language (for example, a Quebec man posted to British Columbia, the western-most and almost exclusively English province) is a "Yes-No-Toaster", as it's joked the only three English words they are guaranteed to know are yes, no, and toaster[[note]]While the French word for a toaster is "grille-pain", French Canadians still say "toaster" due to BrandNameTakeover[[/note]].

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* ''Very'' common in the Canadian Armed Forces, as their military is entirely bilingual but it's its members on an individual level may not be, leading to such conversations between an entirely English and an entirely French soldier trying in vain to communicate to each other. The nickname for a soldier who can barely speak the language (for example, a Quebec man posted to British Columbia, the western-most and almost exclusively English province) is a "Yes-No-Toaster", as it's joked the only three English words they are guaranteed to know are yes, no, and toaster[[note]]While the French word for a toaster is "grille-pain", French Canadians still say "toaster" due to BrandNameTakeover[[/note]].
8th Oct '17 5:34:42 AM gophergiggles
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Very'' common in the Canadian Armed Forces, as their military is entirely bilingual but it's members on an individual level may not be, leading to such conversations between an entirely English and an entirely French soldier trying in vain to communicate to each other. The nickname for a soldier who can barely speak the language (for example, a Quebec man posted to British Columbia, the western-most and almost exclusively English province) is a "Yes-No-Toaster", as it's joked the only three English words they are guaranteed to know are yes, no, and toaster[[note]]While the French word for a toaster is "grille-pain", French Canadians still say "toaster" due to BrandNameTakeover[[/note]].
4th Jul '17 6:58:00 PM samhuddy
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Added DiffLines:

** Adding to this perception is the fact that Hebrew omits the present-tense form of ''lihiot'' ("to be"), sometimes replacing it with a pronoun, resulting in constructions like "she doctor" "the boy he happy."
28th Dec '16 9:32:00 PM lvxferre
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* Most Latin/Romance languages like Portuguese, Spanish, Italian and Romanian (French being an exception) are null-subject languages, meaning the verb can indicate the person it applies to, e.g. "Eu estou" and "Estou" both mean "I am" in English, the first one using the pronoun and the last one not, and both are correct. An uneducated speaker of any of these languages can give such gems as "Am hungry".
** On the other hand, Portuguese and Spanish both have two different versions of "to be". One of them is "ser", being what you are and, supposedly, can't change out of, for example "Being human" or "Being gay". The other is "estar", being in a state out of which you can change, for instance "Being here" or "Being alive" (The exception being "Being dead" Wich translates to "Estar morto/muerto"). Hearing an Englishman say "Estou Inglês/Estoy Inglés" (I'm English) is very funny for someone fluent in any/both of these languages.

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* Most Latin/Romance Subject pronouns are optional in plenty Romance languages like Portuguese, Spanish, Italian and Romanian (French being an exception) are null-subject languages, meaning the verb can indicate the person it applies to, e.g. "Eu estou" and "Estou" Romanian. For example, both mean Italian "io sono" and "sono" are correct, and both are translated as "I am" in English, - with a small emphasis added with the first one using the pronoun and the last one not, and both are correct. An uneducated speaker pronoun. Thus it is common for native speakers of any of these those languages can give such gems say things as "Am hungry".
"am hungry" in English.
** On Among the other hand, Romance languages, French is an exception, making subject pronouns obligatory; and it looks like Portuguese and is following the same path.
** Native English speakers also do their fair share of broken grammar when trying to speak Romance languages. For example, since both
Spanish both have two different versions of verbs "estar" and "ser" are translated as "to be". One of them be", it's tempting for English speakers to say stuff like "estoy inglés" ("I'm English")... except estar/estoy is used for states and (mostly) changeable stuff, so the sentence above sounds like "currently, I'm English, but this might change". (The correct would be "soy inglés", using "ser", being what you are and, supposedly, can't change out of, as usual for example "Being human" or "Being gay". The other is "estar", being in a state out of which you can change, for instance "Being here" or "Being alive" (The exception being "Being dead" Wich translates to "Estar morto/muerto"). Hearing an Englishman say "Estou Inglês/Estoy Inglés" (I'm English) is very funny for someone fluent in any/both of these languages.intrinsic properties).
23rd Oct '16 1:50:13 PM 64SuperNintendo
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* [[https://web.archive.org/web/20110907171937/http://wiki.fandomwank.com/index.php/Now_he_dead_from_coke Now he dead from coke".]]

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* [[https://web.archive.org/web/20110907171937/http://wiki.fandomwank.com/index.php/Now_he_dead_from_coke Now "Now he dead from coke".]]
3rd Oct '16 12:43:58 AM Znex
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* Many Americans view [[JiveTurkey Ebonics]] this way, since it changes about half our grammatical rules. For instance, there's no word for the present tense of "be" (rendered in standard English as "am", "is", or "are") in Ebonics. It's just skipped over. As is the possessive -s. The result can sound like a very broken form of English, and has helped contribute to the "stupid black youth" stereotype. (As in the Nigerian example above, and indeed every dialect in existence, there are grammatical distinctions in Ebonics which are impossible in English; "He working" means "He's at work right now", "He be working" means "He has a regular job".)
** The irony of reliance upon the idea of Ebonics as an identifying language for a group as opposed to a descriptive language for a dialect is that a great many white people from Appalachia and the South speak a dialect nearly identical to Ebonics with the same rules. Those with very little black interaction assume there is more there than actually is.

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* Many Americans view [[JiveTurkey Ebonics]] African American English (or Ebonics)]] this way, since it changes about half our grammatical rules. For instance, there's no word for the present tense of "be" (rendered in standard English as "am", "is", or "are") in Ebonics.AAE. It's just skipped over. As is the possessive -s. The result can sound like a very broken form of English, and has helped contribute to the "stupid black youth" stereotype. (As in the Nigerian example above, and indeed every dialect in existence, there are grammatical distinctions in Ebonics AAE which are impossible in English; "He working" means "He's at work right now", "He be working" means "He has a regular job".)
** The irony of reliance upon the idea of Ebonics AAE as an identifying language for a group as opposed to a descriptive language for a dialect is that a great many white people from Appalachia and the South speak a dialect nearly identical to Ebonics AAE with the same rules. Those with very little black interaction assume there is more there than actually is.
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