History YMMV / YesMinister

29th Apr '17 2:12:54 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* TearJerker: When Bernard makes a serious (if well-intentioned) mistake in 'The Moral Dimension', he seeks Sir Humphrey's advice and is told he must inform the minister. Bernard admits to Jim what he has done, and then they are informed that a journalist is outside, at which point Bernard gives a small cough that could easily be mistaken for a sob. He asks what Jim will do, and when he hears that Jim has no choice but to tell the truth, Bernard is visibly upset. He continues to protest, weakly, but nothing can be done. Fortunately for Bernard, this becomes {{Heartwarming}} when Sir Humphrey steps in and saves his skin.

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* TearJerker: When Bernard makes a serious (if well-intentioned) mistake in 'The Moral Dimension', he seeks Sir Humphrey's advice and is told he must inform the minister. Bernard admits to Jim what he has done, and then they are informed that a journalist is outside, at which point Bernard gives a small cough that could easily be mistaken for a sob. He asks what Jim will do, and when he hears that Jim has no choice but to tell the truth, Bernard is visibly upset. He continues to protest, weakly, but nothing can be done. Fortunately for Bernard, this becomes {{Heartwarming}} [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments heartwarming]] when Sir Humphrey steps in and saves his skin.
11th Jan '17 7:13:43 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical: The series has in fact been criticized as being [[http://reviewsindepth.com/2010/03/yes-prime-minister-the-most-cunning-political-propaganda-ever-conceived/ powerful propaganda for the Thatcher administration]], as it was written by one of her advisors, despite the show portraying civil servants ''and'' politicians as corrupt, the politicians caring only about votes, in spite of the left-leaning sympathies of the show's co-creator, Jonathan Lynn.
* ValuesResonance: it's surprising how relevant some of the political issues explored in the show (though by no means all) still hold true in later decades. For example, one episode deals with upgrading the British nuclear deterrent ''to'' Trident, in recent years the issue has been ''replacing'' Trident; despite being set in the Cold War, it's portrayed as just as ridiculously pointless as many think it to be now. Other issues including government waste, data-gathering and privacy concerns, Britain's place in Europe... And, whilst it was said to draw more by way of examples from the pre-Thatcher era than its own time (Thatcher taking a much harder line with the Civil Service than Jim Hacker ever dared), it remained a big hit with the then-PM and her cabinet.

to:

* WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical: The series has in fact been criticized as being [[http://reviewsindepth.com/2010/03/yes-prime-minister-the-most-cunning-political-propaganda-ever-conceived/ powerful propaganda for the Thatcher administration]], as it was written by one of her advisors, despite the show portraying civil servants ''and'' politicians as corrupt, the politicians caring only about votes, in spite of the left-leaning sympathies of the show's co-creator, Jonathan Lynn.
* ValuesResonance: it's surprising how relevant some of the political issues explored in the show (though by no means all) still hold true in later decades. For example, one episode deals with upgrading the British nuclear deterrent ''to'' Trident, in recent years the issue has been ''replacing'' Trident; despite being set in the Cold War, it's portrayed as just as ridiculously pointless as many think it to be now. Other issues including government waste, data-gathering and privacy concerns, Britain's place in Europe... And, whilst it was said to draw more by way of examples from the pre-Thatcher era than its own time (Thatcher taking a much harder line with the Civil Service than Jim Hacker ever dared), it remained a big hit with the then-PM and her cabinet.cabinet.
* WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical: The series has in fact been criticized as being [[http://reviewsindepth.com/2010/03/yes-prime-minister-the-most-cunning-political-propaganda-ever-conceived/ powerful propaganda for the Thatcher administration]], as it was written by one of her advisors, despite the show portraying civil servants ''and'' politicians as corrupt, the politicians caring only about votes, in spite of the left-leaning sympathies of the show's co-creator, Jonathan Lynn.
13th Dec '16 5:15:21 AM 06tele
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Added DiffLines:

* HarsherInHindsight: In "The Writing on the Wall", Humphrey explains to Hacker how the British policy has always been to set its European rivals against each other, but once they formed the EEC and Britain remained outside it, it was no longer possible to do that, so that's why Britain joined the EEC; to break it up from the inside. In the aftermath of Brexit, and the way far-right political parties have become increasingly popular (in the UK, in Europe and indeed the world over), now that the EU looks genuinely shaky, this is no longer quite as funny as Humphrey found it at the time.
4th Oct '16 4:32:57 AM NERigby96
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* TearJerker: When Bernard makes a serious (if well-intentioned) mistake in 'The Moral Dimension', he seeks Sir Humphrey's advice and is told he must inform the minister. Bernard admits what he has done to Jim, and then they are told that a journalist is outside, at which point Bernard gives a small cough that could easily be mistaken for a sob. He asks what Jim will do, and when he hears that Jim has no choice but to tell the truth, Bernard is visibly upset. He continues to protest, weakly, but nothing can be done. Fortunately for Bernard, this becomes {{Heartwarming}} when Sir Humphrey steps in and saves his skin.

to:

* TearJerker: When Bernard makes a serious (if well-intentioned) mistake in 'The Moral Dimension', he seeks Sir Humphrey's advice and is told he must inform the minister. Bernard admits to Jim what he has done to Jim, done, and then they are told informed that a journalist is outside, at which point Bernard gives a small cough that could easily be mistaken for a sob. He asks what Jim will do, and when he hears that Jim has no choice but to tell the truth, Bernard is visibly upset. He continues to protest, weakly, but nothing can be done. Fortunately for Bernard, this becomes {{Heartwarming}} when Sir Humphrey steps in and saves his skin.
4th Oct '16 2:49:10 AM NERigby96
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Added DiffLines:

* TearJerker: When Bernard makes a serious (if well-intentioned) mistake in 'The Moral Dimension', he seeks Sir Humphrey's advice and is told he must inform the minister. Bernard admits what he has done to Jim, and then they are told that a journalist is outside, at which point Bernard gives a small cough that could easily be mistaken for a sob. He asks what Jim will do, and when he hears that Jim has no choice but to tell the truth, Bernard is visibly upset. He continues to protest, weakly, but nothing can be done. Fortunately for Bernard, this becomes {{Heartwarming}} when Sir Humphrey steps in and saves his skin.
10th Aug '16 5:59:59 PM Anddrix
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* BaseBreaker:
** Dorothy Wainwright from ''Yes, Prime Minister''; fandom is split as to whether she was the strong, politically minded female character that ''Yes, Minister'' was sorely missing (Annie, while a fairly strong character overall, was more of an everywoman), or a CreatorsPet who is constantly shown to be right about ''everything'', and is able to quickly reduce senior civil servants to babbling idiots in a way that even the likes of Ludovic Kennedy couldn't manage.
** Notably Claire Sutton, Dorothy's spiritual successor in the play and 2013 series is considerably less moral and while still brainy makes one or two huge mistakes of her own.

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* BaseBreaker:
**
BaseBreakingCharacter: Dorothy Wainwright from ''Yes, Prime Minister''; fandom is split as to whether she was the strong, politically minded female character that ''Yes, Minister'' was sorely missing (Annie, while a fairly strong character overall, was more of an everywoman), or a CreatorsPet who is constantly shown to be right about ''everything'', and is able to quickly reduce senior civil servants to babbling idiots in a way that even the likes of Ludovic Kennedy couldn't manage.
**
manage. Notably Claire Sutton, Dorothy's spiritual successor in the play and 2013 series is considerably less moral and while still brainy makes one or two huge mistakes of her own.
28th Apr '16 2:32:06 PM ChaoticNovelist
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** {{Padding}}: The series started out as a stage play and retained broadly the same storyline, resulting in a lot of clumsy exposition dumps. In particular, the entirety of the third episode basically consists of just two scenes; firstly Sir Humphrey trying to manipulate Hacker for fraudulent expense claims, and then Hacker trying to do the same to Sir Humphrey for illegal usage of government credit cards.

to:

** {{Padding}}: **{{Padding}}: The series started out as a stage play and retained broadly the same storyline, resulting in a lot of clumsy exposition dumps. In particular, the entirety of the third episode basically consists of just two scenes; firstly Sir Humphrey trying to manipulate Hacker for fraudulent expense claims, and then Hacker trying to do the same to Sir Humphrey for illegal usage of government credit cards.


Added DiffLines:

*WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical: The series has in fact been criticized as being [[http://reviewsindepth.com/2010/03/yes-prime-minister-the-most-cunning-political-propaganda-ever-conceived/ powerful propaganda for the Thatcher administration]], as it was written by one of her advisors, despite the show portraying civil servants ''and'' politicians as corrupt, the politicians caring only about votes, in spite of the left-leaning sympathies of the show's co-creator, Jonathan Lynn.
20th Mar '16 3:06:18 PM OlfinBedwere
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* BaseBreaker: Dorothy Wainwright from ''Yes, Prime Minister''; fandom is split as to whether she was the strong, politically minded female character that ''Yes, Minister'' was sorely missing (Annie, while a fairly strong character overall, was more of an everywoman), or a CreatorsPet who is constantly shown to be right about ''everything'', and is able to quickly reduce senior civil servants to babbling idiots in a way that even the likes of Ludovic Kennedy couldn't manage.

to:

* BaseBreaker: BaseBreaker:
**
Dorothy Wainwright from ''Yes, Prime Minister''; fandom is split as to whether she was the strong, politically minded female character that ''Yes, Minister'' was sorely missing (Annie, while a fairly strong character overall, was more of an everywoman), or a CreatorsPet who is constantly shown to be right about ''everything'', and is able to quickly reduce senior civil servants to babbling idiots in a way that even the likes of Ludovic Kennedy couldn't manage.



* HilariousInHindsight: In "The Moral Dimension," Bernard tells Hacker that he's got a call from "Mr. Haig" in the communications room they set up in the Qumrani royal palace. While Bernard's message was actually to advise Hacker on the availability of Haig whiskey illicitly smuggled into the palace, it carries an extra layer of hilarity when you consider that the role of Hacker was taken over by David Haig for the stage play and 2013 series.
** In "The Smoke Screen", Dr. Thorne's proposals to attack smoking by banning all advertising (even at point of purchase), drastically increasing the tax on cigarettes and instituting a ban on smoking in public places is viewed by the other characters as impractically radical and impossible to implement. Pretty much all of his proposals have (in some way, shape or form) since become real-world government policy in Britain and many other places.

to:

* HilariousInHindsight: HilariousInHindsight:
**
In "The Moral Dimension," Bernard tells Hacker that he's got a call from "Mr. Haig" in the communications room they set up in the Qumrani royal palace. While Bernard's message was actually to advise Hacker on the availability of Haig whiskey illicitly smuggled into the palace, it carries an extra layer of hilarity when you consider that the role of Hacker was taken over by David Haig for the stage play and 2013 series.
** In "The Smoke Screen", Dr. Thorne's proposals to attack smoking by banning all advertising (even at point of purchase), drastically increasing the tax on cigarettes and instituting a ban on smoking in public places is viewed by the other characters as impractically radical and impossible to implement. Pretty much all of his proposals have (in some way, shape or form) since become real-world government policy in Britain and many other places.places, albeit they've generally been phased in gradually rather than in the large, sweeping manner that Thorne was proposing.
21st May '15 8:49:30 PM DoctorNemesis
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** In "The Smoke Screen", Dr. Thorne's proposals to attack smoking by banning all advertising (even at point of purchase), drastically increasing the tax on cigarettes and a ban on smoking in public places is viewed by the other characters as impractically radical and impossible to implement. Pretty much all of his proposals have (in some way, shape or form) since become real-world government policy in Britain and many other places.

to:

** In "The Smoke Screen", Dr. Thorne's proposals to attack smoking by banning all advertising (even at point of purchase), drastically increasing the tax on cigarettes and instituting a ban on smoking in public places is viewed by the other characters as impractically radical and impossible to implement. Pretty much all of his proposals have (in some way, shape or form) since become real-world government policy in Britain and many other places.
21st May '15 8:48:57 PM DoctorNemesis
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Added DiffLines:

** In "The Smoke Screen", Dr. Thorne's proposals to attack smoking by banning all advertising (even at point of purchase), drastically increasing the tax on cigarettes and a ban on smoking in public places is viewed by the other characters as impractically radical and impossible to implement. Pretty much all of his proposals have (in some way, shape or form) since become real-world government policy in Britain and many other places.
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