History YMMV / Sharpe

13th May '18 8:05:24 AM Divra
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** Alice Krige (best known as the Borg Queen from ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'') as La Marquesa.
14th Apr '18 5:21:25 PM SantosLHalper
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** Creator/PaulBettany is the Prince of Orange in ''Sharpe's Waterloo.''*** The novels set in India, especially the scenes of the [[BurnRapeAndPillage sacking]] of various cities, generally show that the British aren't much better.

to:

** Creator/PaulBettany is the Prince of Orange in ''Sharpe's Waterloo.''*** The novels set in India, especially the scenes of the [[BurnRapeAndPillage sacking]] of various cities, generally show that the British aren't much better.''
14th Apr '18 5:21:11 PM SantosLHalper
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** Creator/PaulBettany is the Prince of Orange in ''Sharpe's Waterloo.''
* RonTheDeathEater: While the French were infamous for their brutal treatment of civilians in RealLife, Cornwell often exaggerates their atrocities to the point of resembling. UsefulNotes/WorldWarI-era anti-German atrocity propaganda.
** However, it also has to be said that the books make it fairly clear that the British army isn't much, if any, better, with British soldiers being mentioned as perpetrating some pretty horrific war-crimes after capturing a town/city, and Wellington instituting - as he did in real life - extremely harsh punishments for soldiers caught mistreating the Spanish civilian population, if only because he was acutely aware that the numerically inferior British forces were heavily dependent on the goodwill of the Spanish populace, during an era where Britain and Spain really, ''really'' didn't get on. The main difference is that for the vast majority of the books, we see the action from Sharpe's point of view, and while Sharpe is a ruthless rough and ready soldier, he is also a decent and, in his own way, honourable man who won't let men under his command misbehave - he'll turn a blind eye to a dubiously acquired abandoned pork chop, but nothing more. The main message seems to be that WarIsHell.
*** The novels set in India, especially the scenes of the [[BurnRapeAndPillage sacking]] of various cities, generally show that the British aren't much better.
** Then we get things like Tippoo Sultan practicing HumanSacrifice— Tippoo Sultan ''[[CriticalResearchFailure the devout Muslim]]''. Um...
*** To be fair, it was an over-complicated execution rather than a HumanSacrifice.
*** Actually, while it probably wasn't HumanSacrifice, the British [[TruthInTelevision really did]] find 13 British prisoners who had been murdered in the exact ways described in the book.
** To a degree, William Dodd from ''Sharpe's Triumph''. While he did exist, and the whole part about him fleeing after Wellesley demanded he be discharged and tried for murder in a civilian court after he received an extremely lenient sentence for murder is entirely true, he did not take his entire unit of sepoys with him, and there never was massacre of Chasalgaon. Though it may not count, as Cornwell does mention that he made those parts up in his historical note at the end of the book.

to:

** Creator/PaulBettany is the Prince of Orange in ''Sharpe's Waterloo.''
* RonTheDeathEater: While the French were infamous for their brutal treatment of civilians in RealLife, Cornwell often exaggerates their atrocities to the point of resembling. UsefulNotes/WorldWarI-era anti-German atrocity propaganda.
** However, it also has to be said that the books make it fairly clear that the British army isn't much, if any, better, with British soldiers being mentioned as perpetrating some pretty horrific war-crimes after capturing a town/city, and Wellington instituting - as he did in real life - extremely harsh punishments for soldiers caught mistreating the Spanish civilian population, if only because he was acutely aware that the numerically inferior British forces were heavily dependent on the goodwill of the Spanish populace, during an era where Britain and Spain really, ''really'' didn't get on. The main difference is that for the vast majority of the books, we see the action from Sharpe's point of view, and while Sharpe is a ruthless rough and ready soldier, he is also a decent and, in his own way, honourable man who won't let men under his command misbehave - he'll turn a blind eye to a dubiously acquired abandoned pork chop, but nothing more. The main message seems to be that WarIsHell.
***
''*** The novels set in India, especially the scenes of the [[BurnRapeAndPillage sacking]] of various cities, generally show that the British aren't much better.
** Then we get things like Tippoo Sultan practicing HumanSacrifice— Tippoo Sultan ''[[CriticalResearchFailure the devout Muslim]]''. Um...
*** To be fair, it was an over-complicated execution rather than a HumanSacrifice.
*** Actually, while it probably wasn't HumanSacrifice, the British [[TruthInTelevision really did]] find 13 British prisoners who had been murdered in the exact ways described in the book.
** To a degree, William Dodd from ''Sharpe's Triumph''. While he did exist, and the whole part about him fleeing after Wellesley demanded he be discharged and tried for murder in a civilian court after he received an extremely lenient sentence for murder is entirely true, he did not take his entire unit of sepoys with him, and there never was massacre of Chasalgaon. Though it may not count, as Cornwell does mention that he made those parts up in his historical note at the end of the book.
better.
2nd Apr '18 11:40:42 AM AmuckCricetine
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* CantUnhearIt: It isn't possible to read any of the novels and not hear all Sharpe's dialogue in Creator/SeanBean's accent. Especially since Cornwell {{Ret Canon}}ed in that Sharpe grew up in Yorkshire.

to:

* CantUnhearIt: CantUnHearIt: It isn't possible to read any of the novels and not hear all Sharpe's dialogue in Creator/SeanBean's accent. Especially since Cornwell {{Ret Canon}}ed in that Sharpe grew up in Yorkshire.
31st Mar '18 10:51:31 PM nombretomado
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** Lord. Pumphrey. He's practically a one-man GovernmentConspiracy, and would probably rub along well with Varys of ''ASongOfIceAndFire'' fame. There is ''nothing'' he won't do to protect British interests, but he cements his status in ''Sharpe's Fury'': Not only does he fight alongside Sharpe and Harper (and quite well too), when Sharpe discovers Lord Pumphrey's killing of [[spoiler: Astrid]], Pumphrey mocks him to his face and saunters away scot-free.

to:

** Lord. Pumphrey. He's practically a one-man GovernmentConspiracy, and would probably rub along well with Varys of ''ASongOfIceAndFire'' ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' fame. There is ''nothing'' he won't do to protect British interests, but he cements his status in ''Sharpe's Fury'': Not only does he fight alongside Sharpe and Harper (and quite well too), when Sharpe discovers Lord Pumphrey's killing of [[spoiler: Astrid]], Pumphrey mocks him to his face and saunters away scot-free.
12th Jan '18 8:48:39 AM dracogeorge
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* GeniusBonus: When [=McCandless=] quotes part of Matthew 8:9 as an IronicEcho to Hakeswill, the full line fits the situation even better(and, ironically, may be a misquote)[[labelnote:The line...]]While the exact line is different depending on which version of Literature/TheBible you read, the closest is probably the King James Bible, which says "For I am a man under authority, having soldiers under me: and I say to this man, Go, and he goeth." He misquotes it by saying "I say to ''a'' man", rather than "I say to ''this'' man", though it could be that the version he was quoting from isn't online[[/labelnote]]



** Then we get things like Tippoo Sultan practicing HumanSacrifice— Tippoo Sultan ''[[CriticalResearchFailure the devout Muslim]]''. Um... *** To be fair, it was an over-complicated execution rather than a HumanSacrifice.

to:

*** The novels set in India, especially the scenes of the [[BurnRapeAndPillage sacking]] of various cities, generally show that the British aren't much better.
** Then we get things like Tippoo Sultan practicing HumanSacrifice— Tippoo Sultan ''[[CriticalResearchFailure the devout Muslim]]''. Um...
*** To be fair, it was an over-complicated execution rather than a HumanSacrifice. HumanSacrifice.
*** Actually, while it probably wasn't HumanSacrifice, the British [[TruthInTelevision really did]] find 13 British prisoners who had been murdered in the exact ways described in the book.
** To a degree, William Dodd from ''Sharpe's Triumph''. While he did exist, and the whole part about him fleeing after Wellesley demanded he be discharged and tried for murder in a civilian court after he received an extremely lenient sentence for murder is entirely true, he did not take his entire unit of sepoys with him, and there never was massacre of Chasalgaon. Though it may not count, as Cornwell does mention that he made those parts up in his historical note at the end of the book.
7th Jan '18 7:18:38 AM DarkPhoenix94
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* RonTheDeathEater: While the French were infamous for their brutal treatment of civilians in RealLife, Cornwell often exaggerates their atrocities to the point of nigh-identicality to UsefulNotes/WorldWarI-era anti-German atrocity propaganda.\\
\\
Then we get things like Tippoo Sultan practicing HumanSacrifice— Tippoo Sultan ''[[CriticalResearchFailure the devout Muslim]]''. Um...
** Fairs fair it was an over-complicated execution not a HumanSacrifice. Still fits the trope though.

to:

* RonTheDeathEater: While the French were infamous for their brutal treatment of civilians in RealLife, Cornwell often exaggerates their atrocities to the point of nigh-identicality to resembling. UsefulNotes/WorldWarI-era anti-German atrocity propaganda.\\
\\
propaganda.
** However, it also has to be said that the books make it fairly clear that the British army isn't much, if any, better, with British soldiers being mentioned as perpetrating some pretty horrific war-crimes after capturing a town/city, and Wellington instituting - as he did in real life - extremely harsh punishments for soldiers caught mistreating the Spanish civilian population, if only because he was acutely aware that the numerically inferior British forces were heavily dependent on the goodwill of the Spanish populace, during an era where Britain and Spain really, ''really'' didn't get on. The main difference is that for the vast majority of the books, we see the action from Sharpe's point of view, and while Sharpe is a ruthless rough and ready soldier, he is also a decent and, in his own way, honourable man who won't let men under his command misbehave - he'll turn a blind eye to a dubiously acquired abandoned pork chop, but nothing more. The main message seems to be that WarIsHell.
**
Then we get things like Tippoo Sultan practicing HumanSacrifice— Tippoo Sultan ''[[CriticalResearchFailure the devout Muslim]]''. Um...
** Fairs fair
Um... *** To be fair, it was an over-complicated execution not rather than a HumanSacrifice. Still fits the trope though.
7th Dec '17 3:56:25 AM GriffinPilgrim
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** Fairs fair it was an over-complicated execution not a HumanSacrifice. Still fits the trope though.
5th Dec '17 9:25:14 AM ClintEastwood
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** In the books, it's Major Hogan, Wellington's spymaster, who provided most of the Magnificent Bastardry. He appears in the first two episodes of the series, played near-perfectly by Brian Cox, before having to be replaced by a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute or two and leaving Wellington to pick up the MagnificentBastard role. Numerous exchanges in the books have Wellington as more the uptight one and Hogan as a sly, cunning SOB, only for the TV adaptations to swap the roles and have the spymaster-of-the-week be the stuffy one while Wellington acts like... well, like a MagnificentBastard.

to:

** In the books, it's Major Hogan, Wellington's spymaster, who provided most of the Magnificent Bastardry. He appears in the first two episodes of the series, played near-perfectly by Brian Cox, Creator/BrianCox, before having to be replaced by a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute or two and leaving Wellington to pick up the MagnificentBastard role. Numerous exchanges in the books have Wellington as more the uptight one and Hogan as a sly, cunning SOB, only for the TV adaptations to swap the roles and have the spymaster-of-the-week be the stuffy one while Wellington acts like... well, like a MagnificentBastard.
5th Dec '17 9:23:24 AM ClintEastwood
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* RealityIsUnrealistic: Major Blas Vivar carries a strange object which looks like a pistol without a barrel, and at one point uses it to set a piece of paper on fire. The object is in fact a flintlock lighter, of a type that was the height of fashion among tobacco smokers during UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.Sharpe